Fall 2019 - HSCI 312 D100

Health Promotion: Individuals and Communities (3)

Class Number: 2617

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Th 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
    SSCC 9002, Burnaby

  • Prerequisites:

    60 units, including either HSCI 130 or BPK 140.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Theoretical frameworks and their applications in health promotion and disease prevention. The development, implementation, and evaluation of programs aimed at individuals and communities in Canada and globally. Students with credit for HSCI 401 prior to fall 2010 may not take this course for further credit.

COURSE DETAILS:

OVERALL GOAL AND EXPECTED OUTCOMES:
Health education/promotion interventions and their evaluations are guided by theoretical frameworks. A key aim of this course is to provide the groundwork for understanding, assessing, and effectively applying theory.

COURSE-LEVEL EDUCATIONAL GOALS:

The course is designed to: 
1) Provide an introduction to the role of social/behavioral theory in health education/promotion efforts. 
2) Introduce students to the relationship between behavior and a selection of major health issues. 
3) Provide an introductory background to the kinds of social and behavioral theories that guide our understanding of health related behavior, and that form the background for health promotion and prevention efforts. 
4) Explore some of the ways in which these theories and approaches are used in applied health education/promotion efforts across a variety of settings.

Grading

  • TEST 1 15%
  • TEST 2 30%
  • Individual Needs Assessment Paper 15%
  • Group Proposal Development Assignment 35%
  • Participation 5%

NOTES:

The course meets once a week for lecture and practical work sessions and group activities (discussions, videos, games, case studies, group project work, other in-class exercises). Students are expected to come prepared to contribute and participate in all in-class activities and group work.

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

REQUIRED READING:

1) The following reading will be provided on the course platform as a downloadable PDF document. It is also available online through free ebook websites. 

Glanz, K. and Rimer, B.K. (Second Edition, 2005) Theory at a Glance: A Guide for Health Promotion Practice. US Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health

2) The following is a required textbook that will be on reserve at the W.A.C. Bennett SFU Library (on reserve at desk and via e-book):
Edberg, M. 2015. Essentials of Health Behavior: Social and Behavioral Theory in Public Health. Boston, MA: Jones & Bartlett.  Second Edition
ISBN: 9781449698508

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS