Summer 2019 - CMPT 310 D100

Artificial Intelligence Survey (3)

Class Number: 4797

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Mo, We, Fr 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
    AQ 3181, Burnaby

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Aug 9, 2019
    8:30 AM – 11:30 AM
    Location: TBA

  • Instructor:

    Toby Donaldson
    tjd@sfu.ca
    1 778 782-7433
  • Prerequisites:

    CMPT 225 and (MACM 101 or ENSC 251 and ENSC 252)).

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Provides a unified discussion of the fundamental approaches to the problems in artificial intelligence. The topics considered are: representational typology and search methods; game playing, heuristic programming; pattern recognition and classification; theorem-proving; question-answering systems; natural language understanding; computer vision. Students with credit for CMPT 410 may not take this course for further credit.

COURSE DETAILS:

This course is a broad introduction to the techniques, methodology, and theory of Artificial Intelligence. Depending on time and class interest, the following topics will be discussed.

Topics

  • Meaning, goals, methods and languages of Artificial Intelligence.
  • Knowledge representation.
  • Inference in first order logic; logic programming.
  • Intelligent searching and planning.
  • Natural Language Understanding.
  • Robotics.
  • Machine learning (e.g. neural networks, decision trees).
  • Decision making under uncertainty.
  • Philosophical foundations, ethical Issues, and future expectations.

Grading

NOTES:

Grading will be announced the first week of class.

Students must attain an overall passing grade on the weighted average of exams in the course in order to obtain a clear pass (C- or better).

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

  • Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach (3rd Edition)
  • Stuart Russell, Peter NorviG
  • Prentice HalL
  • 2009

ISBN: 9780136042594

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS