Summer 2019 - CRIM 135 D900

Introduction to Canadian Law and Legal Institutions: A Criminal Justice Perspective (3)

Class Number: 4750

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
    SUR 3090, Surrey

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Aug 8, 2019
    8:30 AM – 11:30 AM
    SUR 5280, Surrey

  • Instructor:

    Persia Sayyari

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

A general introduction to the fundamental and competing principles of jurisprudence and to the basic legal institutions of Canada. Prepares students for those law and law related courses offered within the School of Criminology and will consider the history of Canadian law, the development of the Canadian constitution, the system of Canadian courts and the roles and responsibilities of members of the legal profession. In addition, the course will consider the nature of legal reasoning, the doctrine of precedent, principles of statutory interpretation and will also introduce the fields of contract, torts, administrative law, and family law. Also examines the process of law reform in Canada. Breadth-Social Sciences.

COURSE DETAILS:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: (1) Understand the foundations of Canada’s legal system, the division of powers within the Canadian government and key constitutional principles; (2) think critically about the law as a process of authoritative and controlling decision-making and the role of the law within society; (3) demonstrate their knowledge of the broad social, historic, economic, and political contexts within which Canadian law and legal institutions have developed; and (4) understand how to interpret statutes and case law in order to apply  legal principles to realistic scenarios.  

Grading

  • Midterm Exam 25%
  • Tutorial Assignment 30%
  • Tutorial Participation 10%
  • Final Exam 35%

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

Boyd, Neil. Canadian Law: An Introduction, 7th Edition. Nelson Canada, 2018.

Department Undergraduate Notes:

If you have any Criminology course enrollment requests (course adds, course swaps), please contact a Criminology advisor. Please do not contact instructors for enrollment assistance as they will ultimately refer you to a Criminology advisor.

Criminology course enrollment requests should be sent to a Criminology advisor no later than the last day of the Second week of classes. Late enrollment requests are subject to approval and are not guaranteed. 

Enrollment requests for non-Crim courses should be directed to the advisor for the program offering the course. 



ATTENTION: STUDENTS WITH A DISABILITY: Please contact the Centre for Accessible Learning, (MBC 1250 or Phone 778-782-3112) if you need or require assistance, not your individual instructors.  
-N.B.:  Students are reminded that attendance in the first week of classes is important.  However, there are no tutorials in the first week. Ø  -Assignments not submitted to the Professor/T.A. during class/office hours must be placed in the assignment drop box in front of the General Office of the School of Criminology (SWH 10125).  The assignment drop box is emptied Monday to Friday at 8:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. only, with the contents date stamped accordingly.  No other department’s date stamp will be accepted (e.g. Library/Campus Security).  For the Surrey Campus, assignments must be hand delivered to the General Office of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, located at SUR 5180, on Monday through Friday, between 8:30 a.m. and 3:30p.m., or placed in the assignment drop box located at the southwest corner of Galleria 5.  The Surrey assignment drop box is emptied Monday through Friday at 8:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m., with the contents date stamped accordingly.  The School of Criminology is not responsible for assignments submitted in any other manner (e.g., slid under office doors).  The University does NOT accept assignments by fax or email.
-A student must complete ALL grading components of a course (including assignments, exams, class participation, presentations, chat room components of Distance Education courses, etc.).  Otherwise, a grade of N (incomplete) will be assigned for the entire course. 
-E-mail policy:  The School of Criminology discourages the use of e-mail as a substitute for office hour visits.  The School advises its instructional staff that students wishing to confer with them should do so in person during their office hours.
-The University has formal policies regarding academic dishonesty and grade appeals.  Students are strongly encouraged to familiarize themselves with policy S 10.01, the Code of Academic Integrity and Good Conduct, available on the University’s website.  Information about grade appeals may be obtained from the General Office of the School of Criminology. UNIVERSITY POLICY FORBIDS FINAL EXAMINATIONS WHILE CLASSES ARE STILL IN SESSION.

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS