Fall 2020 - HSCI 312 D100

Health Promotion: Individuals and Communities (3)

Class Number: 6251

Delivery Method: Remote

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Tu 8:30 AM – 11:20 AM
    REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby

  • Prerequisites:

    60 units, including either HSCI 130 or BPK 140.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Theoretical frameworks and their applications in health promotion and disease prevention. The development, implementation, and evaluation of programs aimed at individuals and communities in Canada and globally. Students with credit for HSCI 401 prior to fall 2010 may not take this course for further credit.

COURSE DETAILS:


The class will meet for lecture and course activities in live Zoom sessions on Tuesdays from 9:30-11:20 am. It is recommended for students to be present and treat this session as they would a regular lecture, but it will be recorded and uploaded to the course Canvas page for those who are not able to attend. During the first week of class, students will be surveyed to schedule a second weekly session that will mainly serve as group work and office hours time.

COURSE-LEVEL EDUCATIONAL GOALS:


OVERALL GOAL AND EXPECTED OUTCOMES:

Health education/promotion interventions and their evaluations are guided by theoretical frameworks. A key aim of this course is to provide the groundwork for understanding, assessing, and effectively applying theory.

The course is designed to: 

1) Provide an introduction to the role of social/behavioral theory in health education/promotion efforts. 
2) Introduce students to the relationship between behavior and a selection of major health issues. 
3) Provide an introductory background to the kinds of social and behavioral theories that guide our understanding of health-related behavior, and that form the background for health promotion and prevention efforts. 
4) Explore how these theories and approaches are used in applied health education/promotion efforts across a variety of settings.

Grading

  • TEST 1 15%
  • TEST 2 25%
  • Needs Assessment Paper (Individual ) 15%
  • Health Promotion Proposal (Group) 30%
  • Participation, discussion, reflection activities 15%

REQUIREMENTS:

Computer and Intenet access are required

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

The required readings and other learning materials will be available on the course Canvas page on a weekly bases. 

The following textbook is highly recommended: 
Edberg, M. Essentials of Health Behavior: Social and Behavioral Theory in Public Health. Boston, MA: Jones & Bartlett.  Third Edition, © 2019. 
https://www.jblearning.com/catalog/productdetails/9781284069341 
ISBN: 9781284069341

RECOMMENDED READING:

Weekly Readings will be provided on Canvas 

Registrar Notes:

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

TEACHING AT SFU IN FALL 2020

Teaching at SFU in fall 2020 will be conducted primarily through remote methods. There will be in-person course components in a few exceptional cases where this is fundamental to the educational goals of the course. Such course components will be clearly identified at registration, as will course components that will be “live” (synchronous) vs. at your own pace (asynchronous). Enrollment acknowledges that remote study may entail different modes of learning, interaction with your instructor, and ways of getting feedback on your work than may be the case for in-person classes. To ensure you can access all course materials, we recommend you have access to a computer with a microphone and camera, and the internet. In some cases your instructor may use Zoom or other means requiring a camera and microphone to invigilate exams. If proctoring software will be used, this will be confirmed in the first week of class.

Students with hidden or visible disabilities who believe they may need class or exam accommodations, including in the current context of remote learning, are encouraged to register with the SFU Centre for Accessible Learning (caladmin@sfu.ca or 778-782-3112).