Fall 2020 - REM 454 D100

Water Security (4)

Class Number: 5845

Delivery Method: Remote

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Mo, We 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
    REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby

  • Prerequisites:

    75 units and REM 100 or EVSC 100 or GEOG 100.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Students investigate dimensions of the global environmental crisis related to water security, including: human rights, political science, development economics, gender policies, geopolitics, regional integration and security, international law, national legislation, public health, trade, agriculture, energy generation, and water resources management.

COURSE DETAILS:

Students investigate broad dimensions of water security, including: human rights, political science, development economics, gender policies, geopolitics, regional integration and security, international law, national legislation, public health, trade, agriculture, energy generation, and water resources management. The primary delivery mode of the course is problem-based learning in a synchronous virtual environment, using current, real-world problems.

Two 2-hour virtual lecture sessions each week include a one-hour lecture and a one-hour interactive discovery session. The classroom sessions introduce basic and applied concepts related to various dimensions of water security, reinforced by background reading from the textbook and other sources. Three class assignments require students to apply concepts investigated in class and through their prior learnings to develop out-of-the-box solutions to water security problems around the world.

Students team up to undertake a practicum assignment, to be submitted in writing and presented virtually to the class at the end of the course; there is no final exam. Each team investigates a specific water security problem – often picked up from the news headlines – and prepares the evidence-base used to develop a policy-relevant written piece.

Synchronous Delivery.

COURSE-LEVEL EDUCATIONAL GOALS:

Students gain insights into how achieving water security constitutes the keystone for eradicating poverty, achieving human wellbeing, and assuring sustainable economic growth. The students are able to achieve the following learning outcomes:

  • Define core concepts of water security, including morality, ethics, economics, and politics
  • Articulate broad principles of water governance
  • Analyze roles & perspectives of different stakeholders
  • Recognize & articulate contemporary water challenges in different contexts
  • Integrate diverse, interlinked water security concepts to solve a real-world water problem
  • Communicate solutions in a policy-relevant, compelling, evidence-based manner

Grading

  • Mid-Term Exam 20%
  • Class Assignments (3) 30%
  • Practicum 30%
  • In-class Participation 15%
  • Background Reading 5%

Materials

MATERIALS + SUPPLIES:

Lecture PowerPoint presentations and any additional reading and supplementary materials are made available through SFU Canvas (sfu.ca/canvas).

REQUIRED READING:

Textbook: The Human Face of Water Security, David Devlaeminck, Zafar Adeel, and Robert Sandford (2017, Springer).

Additional readings, including book chapters, policy reports, and research papers, are assigned to supplement the text book.

Registrar Notes:

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

TEACHING AT SFU IN FALL 2020

Teaching at SFU in fall 2020 will be conducted primarily through remote methods. There will be in-person course components in a few exceptional cases where this is fundamental to the educational goals of the course. Such course components will be clearly identified at registration, as will course components that will be “live” (synchronous) vs. at your own pace (asynchronous). Enrollment acknowledges that remote study may entail different modes of learning, interaction with your instructor, and ways of getting feedback on your work than may be the case for in-person classes. To ensure you can access all course materials, we recommend you have access to a computer with a microphone and camera, and the internet. In some cases your instructor may use Zoom or other means requiring a camera and microphone to invigilate exams. If proctoring software will be used, this will be confirmed in the first week of class.

Students with hidden or visible disabilities who believe they may need class or exam accommodations, including in the current context of remote learning, are encouraged to register with the SFU Centre for Accessible Learning (caladmin@sfu.ca or 778-782-3112).