Fall 2020 - SA 255 J100

Introduction to Social Research (SA) (4)

Class Number: 2555

Delivery Method: Remote

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Fr 5:30 PM – 9:20 PM
    REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Dec 14, 2020
    7:00 PM – 10:00 PM
    REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby

  • Instructor:

    Jelena Golubovic
    jga22@sfu.ca
    Office Hours: Fr 11:00-12:00 pm via BB Collaborate Ultra
  • Prerequisites:

    SA 101 or 150.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Explores how sociologists and anthropologists investigate social relations and contexts. Students learn to develop research questions and turn them into research projects. Introduces data collection techniques and related ethical issues, the relationship between theory and research, and other fundamental concepts and issues involved in conducting qualitative and quantitative research. Quantitative.

COURSE DETAILS:

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of social research, from design to practice. Focusing on research methods and strategies common in anthropology and sociology, this course will highlight both qualitative and quantitative research approaches, and will emphasize the benefits of methodologically diverse research design. Students will have the opportunity to explore their own research interests as they investigate what kinds of questions they could ask, and what kind of findings they could uncover, through employing different research approaches.

COURSE-LEVEL EDUCATIONAL GOALS:

By the end of the course, students will understand how to formulate researchable research questions, how to select among various research methods and strategies, how to engage social theory within research design, how to analyze and interpret different kinds of data, and how to critically assess and evaluate scientific knowledge.

Grading

  • Assignments (3 x 10%) 30%
  • Midterm exam 20%
  • Research proposal 20%
  • Final exam 30%

NOTES:

Grading: Where a final exam is scheduled and the student does not write the exam or withdraw from the course before the deadline date, an N grade will be assigned. Unless otherwise specified on the course syllabus, all graded assignments for this course must be completed for a final grade other than N to be assigned. An N is considered as an F for the purposes of scholastic standing.

Grading System: The Undergraduate Course Grading System is as follows:

A+ (95-100) | A (90-94) | A- (85-89) | B+ (80-84) | B (75-79) | B- (70-74) | C+ (65-69) | C (60-64) | C- (55-59) | D (50-54) | F (0-49) | N*
*N standing to indicate the student did not complete course requirements

Academic Dishonesty and Misconduct Policy: The Department of Sociology & Anthropology follows SFU policy in relation to grading practices, grade appeals (Policy T 20.01) and academic dishonesty and misconduct procedures (S10.01‐S10.04). Unless otherwise informed by your instructor in writing, in graded written assignments you must cite the sources you rely on and include a bibliography/list of references, following an instructor-approved citation style.  It is the responsibility of students to inform themselves of the content of SFU policies available on the SFU website.

Centre for Accessible Learning: Students with hidden or visible disabilities who believe they may need classroom or exam accommodations are encouraged to register with the SFU Centre for Accessible Learning (1250 Maggie Benston Centre) as soon as possible to ensure that they are eligible and that approved accommodations and services are implemented in a timely fashion.

Materials

MATERIALS + SUPPLIES:

Please see SFU Bookstore website for information on textbook purchase options.

REQUIRED READING:

Bryman, A., & Bell, E. (2019). Social Research Methods, Fifth Canadian Edition. Oxford University Press.


ISBN: 978-0-199029440

Registrar Notes:

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

TEACHING AT SFU IN FALL 2020

Teaching at SFU in fall 2020 will be conducted primarily through remote methods. There will be in-person course components in a few exceptional cases where this is fundamental to the educational goals of the course. Such course components will be clearly identified at registration, as will course components that will be “live” (synchronous) vs. at your own pace (asynchronous). Enrollment acknowledges that remote study may entail different modes of learning, interaction with your instructor, and ways of getting feedback on your work than may be the case for in-person classes. To ensure you can access all course materials, we recommend you have access to a computer with a microphone and camera, and the internet. In some cases your instructor may use Zoom or other means requiring a camera and microphone to invigilate exams. If proctoring software will be used, this will be confirmed in the first week of class.

Students with hidden or visible disabilities who believe they may need class or exam accommodations, including in the current context of remote learning, are encouraged to register with the SFU Centre for Accessible Learning (caladmin@sfu.ca or 778-782-3112).