Spring 2020 - CMPT 120 D200

Introduction to Computing Science and Programming I (3)

Class Number: 6627

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Mo, We, Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
    WMC 3520, Burnaby

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Apr 22, 2020
    3:30 PM – 6:30 PM
    SSCC 9001, Burnaby

  • Prerequisites:

    BC Math 12 or equivalent is recommended.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

An elementary introduction to computing science and computer programming, suitable for students with little or no programming background. Students will learn fundamental concepts and terminology of computing science, acquire elementary skills for programming in a high-level language and be exposed to diverse fields within, and applications of computing science. Topics will include: pseudocode, data types and control structures, fundamental algorithms, computability and complexity, computer architecture, and history of computing science. Treatment is informal and programming is presented as a problem-solving tool. Students with credit for CMPT 102, 128, 130 or 166 may not take this course for further credit. Students who have taken CMPT 125, 129, 130 or 135 first may not then take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

COURSE DETAILS:

An elementary introduction to computing science and computer programming, suitable for students with little or no programming background. Students will learn fundamental concepts and terminology of computing science, acquire elementary skills for programming in a high-level language and be exposed to diverse fields within, and applications of computing science. ------------------------- i-Clickers will be used regularly in class from the beginning of the semester as will be explained in class. The three i-Clicker 1 i-Clicker 2, and i-Clicker+ may be used. SFU Bookstore will be supplying i-Clickers - Each student needs to have his/her own i-Clicker, but they can be used for different courses. ------------------------- CMPT 120 PLACEMENT TEST – do you have enough computing knowledge to pass our placement test? Have you taken Computing Science courses in High School or elsewhere? Have you worked in a business or volunteered as a computer programmer? Have you written programs of 200-300 lines of code or more? IF YES you may NOT have to take CMPT 120 and could enroll directly into the next required courses – CMPT 125 and 127. Challenge yourself and take our placement test. https://courses.cs.sfu.ca/forms/cmpt-cmpt-120-placement-test/ IF NO – please go ahead and enroll in CMPT 120.

Topics

  • Algorithms, flowcharts, pseudocode
  • Procedural programming in Python
  • Data types and control structures
  • Fundamental algorithms, including searching, sorting, basics of recursion
  • Computability and complexity, introduction
  • Basics of binary encoding

Grading

NOTES:

To be discussed during the first week of classes

REQUIREMENTS:

Students must attain an overall passing grade on the weighted average of exams in the course in order to obtain a clear pass (C- or better).

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

  • Think Python - How to Think Like a Computer Scientist - Python 3, Allen Downey, Green Tea Press, Green Tea Press, 2015, 9781449330729, Free Download: http://www.greenteapress.com/thinkpython2/thinkpython2.pdf Also available in Kindle version and as paperback
  • CMPT 120 Study Guide (Python 2), Greg Baker, SFU, 2004, Free Download: http://www.cs.sfu.ca/CC/120/ggbaker/guide/
  • I-Clickers, , 9781429280471

RECOMMENDED READING:

  • Starting Out with Python, 4th Edition, Tony Gaddis, Pearson Education Inc., 2017, 9780134543666
  • Computer Science Illuminated, Edition 5, Nell Dale, John Lewis, Jones & Bartlett, 2012, 9781449672843, 6th Edition is also available-9781284055917
  • Starting out with Programming Logic and Design, Tony Gaddis, Pearson, 2015, 9780133985078

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS