Spring 2020 - HUM 309 D100

Literatures and the Arts Across Cultures (4)

Class Number: 5415

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Th 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
    WMC 3255, Burnaby

  • Instructor:

    Edward Surman
  • Prerequisites:

    45 units.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

An interdisciplinary study of literary texts in translation and/or art forms across cultures and periods. Students with credit for HUM 381 or 382 under this topic may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities.

COURSE DETAILS:

Making Monotheism: The Role of Literary, Performing, and Visual Arts in the Development, Spread, and Perception of Monotheism across Cultures.

This course considers the role of Literature and the Arts in the generation, spread, and social construction of the category of religions called Monotheism across cultures and time. We will use digital qualitative data analysis approaches to examine the ways in which literary, performing, and visual art has been deployed to define the concept of Monotheism. By close- reading texts, recordings, and images, we will produce quantitative data to support our analyses of these artifacts. Class meetings will include lectures, skills-based workshops, and reading discussions.

Grading

  • Attendance 10%
  • In Class Writing Assignments (10) 20%
  • Reading Question Assignments (5) 25%
  • Qualitative Digital Text Analysis Question Assignments (5) 25%
  • Digital Essay Final Project 20%

Materials

MATERIALS + SUPPLIES:

Access to Atlas.ti qualitative data analysis software
(single semester and two-year student licenses available at https://atlasti.com/students/)

REQUIRED READING:

All readings will be provided by instructor

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS