Spring 2020 - IS 230 J100

Beyond the Nation-State: Identity and Belonging in a Globalized World (3)

Class Number: 7499

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Tu 5:30 PM – 8:20 PM
    HCC 1425, Vancouver

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Apr 14, 2020
    11:31 PM – 11:59 PM
    TAKE HOME-EXAM, Burnaby

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

This course surveys the diverse ways people have fashioned identities and social relations that do not easily conform to the boundaries of nation-states. Explores how, in the context of transnational movements of people and ideas, individuals and communities construct and contest new identities, aspirations, and forms of belonging. Breadth-Humanities/Social Sciences.

COURSE DETAILS:

From identity to development, governance, and social networks, the impact of global realities is today pervasive. At the very least, these realities are not contained within the boundaries of nation-states. We will explore how, in the context of transnational movements of people and ideas, individuals and communities construct and contest new identities, aspirations, and forms of belonging. In particular, this course surveys the many ways in which migration illuminates the interplay of global and local—and informs our understanding of the political, legal, economic and social factors that shape the modern landscape. For the sociologist Stuart Hall, the result is a vital “imaginary coherence” to human bonds beyond borders. Critical thinking with regard to foundational ideas and their application is encouraged.   

The course will draw on a range of resources across the social sciences & humanities, including digital and artistic media.                 

Grading

  • Class Presentation & Contribution 30%
  • Midterm 30%
  • Final Take-Home Exam 40%

NOTES:

Note:  Students who have taken IS 230 Transnationalism & Society cannot take this course for further credit.

Students will be required to submit their written assignments to Turnitin.com in order to receive credit for the assignments and for the course.

The School for International Studies strictly enforces the University's policies regarding plagiarism and other forms of academic dishonesty. Information about these policies can be found at: http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/teaching.html.

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

Howard, Michael.  Transnationalism and Society: An Introduction.  McFarland, 2011.
ISBN: 9780786464548

Additional readings provided on Canvas.

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS