Spring 2020 - IS 309 D200

Special Topics in International Security and Conflict (4)

Human Security

Class Number: 6552

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Mo 9:30 AM – 1:20 PM
    WMC 2503, Burnaby

  • Prerequisites:

    45 units.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Specific details of courses to be offered will be published prior to enrollment each term.

COURSE DETAILS:

This course examines the relationship between conflicts and development, and an exploration of the concept of human security as an approach to both development and peace-building. Students will become familiar with key theories of conflict, with particular attention to recent theories of “new wars” in the context of globalized economies and transnational networks. There will be exploration of the relationship between conflict and development outcomes using case studies. The bulk of the emphasis will be placed on the processes through which a diverse set of actors develop global public policy responses by articulating new policy agendas, defining policy recommendations, building governmental and non-governmental coalitions, negotiating international agreements, and monitoring and evaluating policy implementation. Attention will be given to assessing policy development strategies appropriate to the various stages of the public policy cycle, and to results-based approaches to effectively utilizing scarce resources.

COURSE-LEVEL EDUCATIONAL GOALS:

This course will explore a series of human security issues drawing on the perspectives of key governmental, international and non-governmental actors. It will examine substantive policy agendas designed to increase the safety of individuals from physical violence and armed conflict including: cluster munitions and small arms; the protection of civilians and the responsibility to protect; women, peace and security; international criminal justice and war economies. The bulk of the emphasis will be placed on the processes through which a diverse set of actors develop global public policy responses by articulating new policy agendas, defining policy recommendations, building governmental and non-governmental coalitions, negotiating international agreements, and monitoring and evaluating policy

Grading

  • Midterm (in-class) 20%
  • Policy Paper 30%
  • Final Exam (take-home) 30%
  • Participation/Presentation 20%

NOTES:

Students who have completed POL 373, POL 349 Special Topics or IS 409 Special Topics for credit under this title may not take this course for further credit.

Students will be required to submit their written assignments to Turnitin.com in order to receive credit for the assignments and for the course.

The School for International Studies strictly enforces the University's policies regarding plagiarism and other forms of academic dishonesty. Information about these policies can be found at: http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/teaching.html.

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

Fen Osler Hampson, Madness in the Multitude: Human Security and World Disorder, Oxford University Press, 2002

RECOMMENDED READING:

Alan Collins, Contemporary Security Studies, Oxford University Press, 2010.

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS