Spring 2020 - MACM 101 D100

Discrete Mathematics I (3)

Class Number: 6624

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Mo, We, Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
    WMC 3520, Burnaby

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Apr 21, 2020
    3:30 PM – 6:30 PM
    RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby

  • Instructor:

    Ryan McBride
  • Prerequisites:

    BC Math 12 (or equivalent), or any of MATH 100, 150, 151, 154, 157.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Introduction to counting, induction, automata theory, formal reasoning, modular arithmetic. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

COURSE DETAILS:

Instructor's Objectives

This course is an introduction to mathematical reasoning underlying much of computer science: discrete mathematics. We will cover mathematical logic (both propositional and predicate) and proof techniques (including induction), counting principles, and a variety of discrete structures, with Computer Science applications.

Topics

  • Propositional logic
  • Predicate logic
  • Basic proof techniques
  • Sets, functions and relations, including growth of functions
  • Mathematical induction and its variants
  • Recursive definitions and structural induction
  • Counting principles
  • Basic probability

 

Grading

NOTES:

A combination of assignments, midterms, tutorial quizzes and a final exam. Details to be discussed at the start of the semester.

Students must attain an overall passing grade on the weighted average of exams in the course in order to obtain a clear pass (C- or better).

Materials

RECOMMENDED READING:

  • Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications
  • 8th Edition,
  • Kenneth H. Rosen,
  • McGraw Hill,
  • 2018,
  • 7th or 8th Edition is acceptable

ISBN: 9781260091991

  • Mathematics for Computer Science
  • Albert R. Meyer, Eric Lehman, and Frank Thomson Leighton,
  • online,
  • 2018
  • https://courses.csail.mit.edu/6.042/spring18/mcs.pdf

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS