Spring 2020 - MATH 320 D100

Introduction to Analysis II (3)

Class Number: 3731

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Mo, We, Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
    AQ 4120, Burnaby

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Apr 22, 2020
    3:30 PM – 6:30 PM
    AQ 5016, Burnaby

  • Prerequisites:

    MATH 242 and 251.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Sequences and series of functions, topology of sets in Euclidean space, introduction to metric spaces, functions of several variables. Quantitative.

COURSE DETAILS:

Who should take this course?
The course is aimed at students interested in rigor, mathematics and mathematical thinking. Along with analysis 1 and introductory algebra, this is a foundational course. That means the concepts and material in this course will be used in further mathematics courses. It also means that it will require practice and dedication.

What is the material we'll see in this class?
The breathtaking description in the calendar says: Sequences and series of functions, topology of sets in Euclidean space, introduction to metric spaces, functions of several variables.

You were introduced to many of these ideas in Math 242 (Intro to Analysis 1), and this course delves into these concepts in a deeper way. We'll revisit the notion of distances, and we'll see some generalizations of the notion of continuity, differentiation and integration. We'll examine again sequences and series of functions, and end the term by thinking about some familiar "special" functions: exponentials, logarithms, sines and cosines.

Since this is still a new and very careful way of thinking for most students, the key to success in this course is practice.

Grading

  • Homework 20%
  • Midterm I 20%
  • Midterm II 20%
  • Final Exam 40%

NOTES:

THE INSTRUCTOR RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CHANGE ANY OF THE ABOVE INFORMATION.
Students should be aware that they have certain rights to confidentiality concerning the return of course papers and the posting of marks.
Please pay careful attention to the options discussed in class at the beginning of the semester.

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

Principles of Mathematical Analysis
3/E
Walter Rudin
McGraw-Hill
ISBN: 9780070542358

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS