Spring 2020 - PSYC 362 D100

Close Relationships (3)

Class Number: 8284

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Mo 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
    SWH 10081, Burnaby

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Apr 24, 2020
    8:30 AM – 11:30 AM
    RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby

  • Prerequisites:

    PSYC 201 and 260.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Reviews theory and research on the psychology of romantic relationships. Topics may include relationship theories, communication, social cognitive processes, intimate partner violence, and relationship interventions.

COURSE DETAILS:

In this course, you will learn about the science of close relationships with a specific focus on romantic relationships. The course will explore the different phases of relationships: what attracts people to partners, how and why people maintain their relationships, relationship difficulties and dissolution, and single life after relationships end. We will draw on important theories of close relationships to guide our understanding of these individual and dyadic processes (e.g., attachment theory, interdependence theory, investment model).

COURSE-LEVEL EDUCATIONAL GOALS:

Course Objectives:
Although we will focus on specific topics throughout the course, the major objectives of this class are to critically evaluate claims about relationships using relationship research, and to apply your understanding of relationship theories and research about dyadic processes to explain different relationship processes.

Topics:
Attachment Theory: Normative and Individual Differences, Initial Attraction & Self-Expansion Theory, Interdependence Theory & The Investment Model, Social Cognitive Processes, Relationship Conflict, Support in Close Relationships, Capitalization, Sacrifice, & Forgiveness, Sex, Passion, and Intimacy, Jealousy and Infidelity, Couples Therapy, Suffocation Model of Marriage and Divorce, Singlehood Experiences.

Lectures:
Lectures are designed to be highly interactive and include videos, iclicker opinion polls, and class and small-group discussions. Attendance and participation are STRONGLY encouraged. No lecture recordings are available.

Grading

  • Mid-Term Exam: 20%
  • Participation: 10%
  • Term Paper/Project: 25%
  • Final Exam: 40%
  • Class Project Results: 5%

NOTES:

THERE WILL BE NO PREREQUISITE WAIVERS GIVEN FOR THIS CLASS.

Materials

MATERIALS + SUPPLIES:

This course requires the use of iclickers to collect in-class responses from students. You may use the iclicker1 or 2 for all iclicker assignments in class.

REQUIRED READING:

There is no textbook for this course. Readings will be available via the SFU library.

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS