Spring 2020 - PSYC 381 D100

Behavioral Endocrinology (3)

Class Number: 7574

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Th 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
    AQ 3003, Burnaby

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Apr 21, 2020
    12:00 PM – 3:00 PM
    EDB 7618, Burnaby

  • Prerequisites:

    PSYC 201 and 280.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Examines the ways in which hormones influence the nervous system, regulating essential behaviors such as eating, drinking, sex, parenting, sleep, emotional behavior and cognitive processes.

COURSE DETAILS:

Many fundamental behaviours are controlled by the body's hormonal systems. This course will provide a survey of behavioural endocrinology, touching on topics including sexual differentiation, male and female sexual behaviour, parental behaviour, eating and drinking, aggression, learning, mood, and other topics.

COURSE-LEVEL EDUCATIONAL GOALS:

By the end of the course, students should have a sound understanding of the roles of ways in which the hormonal systems of the body influence the nervous system to direct and coordinate behaviour in adaptive ways, including the cellular actions of hormones in the brain, the permanent developmental roles of steroid hormones during critical periods of neural organization, and the transient effects of fluctations in varying peptides and steroids on diverse behaviors in adulthood.

Grading

  • Mid-Term Exam: 40%
  • Term Paper/Project: 15%
  • Final Exam: 45%

NOTES:

The criteria for the determination of letter grades in this course will be presented during the first week of lectures.

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

Nelson, R.J., and Kriegsfeld, L.J. (2018). An Introduction to Behavioral Endocrinology (5th Ed.). New York: Sinauer / Oxford University Press.

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS