Spring 2020 - PSYC 391 D500

Selected Topics in Psychology (3)

Stalking and Intimate Partner Violence

Class Number: 8295

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Th 8:30 AM – 11:20 AM
    BLU 9660, Burnaby

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Apr 17, 2020
    8:30 AM – 11:30 AM
    SSCB 9200, Burnaby

  • Prerequisites:

    PSYC 201. Other prerequisites vary by topic offering.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Course can be repeated for credit. Students may not take this course for further credit if similar topics are covered. See Psychology department website for course description.

COURSE DETAILS:

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of issues relating to intimate partner viol
ence (IPV) and stalking. The course assumes that students have taken introductory classes in abnor
mal psychology and/or classes in forensic psychology/criminology.

COURSE-LEVEL EDUCATIONAL GOALS:

The primary objectives of this course include providing a foundational knowledge in the area of intima
te partner violence and stalking (including defining these types of violence, theories, and etiologies), r
elevant scientific research, and clinical issues pertaining to risk assessment and management of thes
e particular types of violence.

Grading

  • Mid-Term Exam: 30%
  • Writing Assignments: 40%
  • Final Exam: 30%

NOTES:

Lectures:
Theories & Etiologies of Intimate Partner Violence, Risk Assessment, Management Issues, & Treatm
ent in IPV, Victim Safety Planning & Intimate Partner Homicide, Issues in Policing, Special Considerat
ions in IPV, Nature, Prevalence, & Victim Impact of Stalking, Etiologies & Typologies of Stalking, Risk
Assessment and Management Issues, Treatment of Stalking Offenders

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

There is no required text. Copies of weekly readings will be provided through the course Canvas website.

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS