Summer 2020 - HIST 330W D100

Controversies in Canadian History (4)

Displacements & Resettlements

Class Number: 3274

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Th 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
    REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Aug 13, 2020
    8:30 AM – 11:30 AM
    Location: TBA

  • Prerequisites:

    45 units, including six units of lower division history.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

An examination of selected topics in Canadian history. The content will vary from offering to offering. See department for further information. HIST 330W may be repeated for credit only when a different topic is taught. Students may not take selected topics within HIST 330W for further credit if duplicating content of another history course and vice versa. Writing.

COURSE DETAILS:

Canada, often seen as a land of wilderness, mobility, and “wide open spaces,” was and continues to be a site of forced displacements, resettlements, and relocations of peoples. From the deportation of the Acadians in the 18th century up to present-day gentrification, people in Canada—as one historian recently noted—have been “on the move.” This is putting it mildly: more often than we care to admit, displacements of peoples in the Canadian past were born out of immense colonial, genocidal, and wartime violence.  

What accounts for these controversial moments in Canada’s past? In this course, we will trace the histories of displacements and resettlements. We will engage with theory, scholarly accounts, original source material such as oral histories and documents, public history (including several visits to museums, archives, and walking tours) and material culture to help us better understand why displacements happened. We will also consider how ordinary people experienced and responded to them, and, with an eye to the future, what lessons might be drawn from these histories for how we might respond to displacements today. Examples of topics:  the Indian Act and the creation/formalization of reserves; internment policies during World War Two; racialized resettlements in Africville (NS), and Hogan’s Alley; the displacement of sex-workers in the West End; and rural resettlements, suburbanization, and deindustrialization during the Cold War and beyond. For much of the course, you can choose the topic(s). Canada, often seen as a land of wilderness, mobility, and “wide open spaces,” was and continues to be a site of forced displacements, resettlements, and relocations of peoples. From the deportation of the Acadians in the 18th century up to present-day gentrification, people in Canada—as one historian recently noted—have been “on the move.” This is putting it mildly: more often than we care to admit, displacements of peoples in the Canadian past were born out of immense colonial, genocidal, and wartime violence.   What accounts for these controversial moments in Canada’s past? In this course, we will trace the histories of displacements and resettlements. We will engage with theory, scholarly accounts, original source material such as oral histories and documents, public history (including several visits to museums, archives, and walking tours) and material culture to help us better understand why displacements happened. We will also consider how ordinary people experienced and responded to them, and, with an eye to the future, what lessons might be drawn from these histories for how we might respond to displacements today. Examples of topics:  the Indian Act and the creation/formalization of reserves; internment policies during World War Two; racialized resettlements in Africville (NS), and Hogan’s Alley; the displacement of sex-workers in the West End; and rural resettlements, suburbanization, and deindustrialization during the Cold War and beyond. For much of the course, you can choose the topic(s). 

Grading

  • Participation (ongoing) 20%
  • “Course Diary” (first half of course) – 20%; Reflection Paper on Course Diary (10%) 30%
  • End-of-course mini-conference (a final project) in Weeks 12 and 13. Your first draft of your own paper (10%); Your final draft of your paper (20%); Your presentation based on your paper (10%) 50%

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

Tina Loo, Moved by the State: Forced Relocation and Making a Good Life in Postwar Canada. Vancouver: UBC Press, 2019.

Adele Perry, Aqueduct: Colonialism, Resources, and the Histories We Remember. Winnipeg: ARP Books, 2016.

Registrar Notes:

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

TEACHING AT SFU IN SUMMER 2020

Please note that all teaching at SFU in summer term 2020 will be conducted through remote methods. Enrollment in this course acknowledges that remote study may entail different modes of learning, interaction with your instructor, and ways of getting feedback on your work than may be the case for in-person classes.

Students with hidden or visible disabilities who believe they may need class or exam accommodations, including in the current context of remote learning, are encouraged to register with the SFU Centre for Accessible Learning (caladmin@sfu.ca or 778-782-3112) as soon as possible to ensure that they are eligible and that approved accommodations and services are implemented in a timely fashion.