Fall 2021 - EDUC 423 D200

Helping Relationships (4)

Class Number: 7703

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Fr 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
    HCC 2540, Vancouver

  • Prerequisites:

    Or corequisite: EDUC 323.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Introduction to the rationale for and the practice of basic counselling skills. Emphasis on the development of counselling skills as a means of establishing effective helping relationships in educational settings.

COURSE DETAILS:

This course is designed to train students in a broad repertoire of counselling skills in order to increase their competence in fostering helping/therapeutic relationship and empathic listening and responding for facilitating (simulated) client self-awareness and self-exploration.

COURSE-LEVEL EDUCATIONAL GOALS:

This course is designed to train students in a broad repertoire of counselling skills in order to increase their competence in fostering helping/therapeutic relationship and empathic listening and responding for facilitating (simulated) client self-awareness and self-exploration.

Expected Outcomes

  1. To consistently demonstrate helpful qualities of respect, empathy, and genuineness while interacting with others.
  2. To demonstrate the ability to give undivided attention during an interview.
  3. To demonstrate the ability to observe others accurately without distorting the meaning of non-verbal cues.
  4. To demonstrate the ability to listen actively which includes checking with others to gain understanding of the content and intended meanings of their messages.
  5. To demonstrate the ability to use probing skills appropriately.
  6. To facilitate the interviewee's open and constructive exploration and understanding of self and personally relevant issues.
  7. To demonstrate the ability to temporarily suspend personal values, beliefs, judgments, emotions and premature advice when in the process of listening to, and showing understanding of, others.
  8. To acquire accurate empathic responding skills and communicate to the interviewee the helper's empathic understanding of the interviewee's feelings and intended meanings.
  9. To demonstrate the ability to be aware of self and others simultaneously, without losing track of the boundary between self and others.
  10. To increase your awareness of your own natural resources for helping others.
  11. To demonstrate knowledge of a philosophy of helping.
  12. To demonstrate the ability to give and receive feedback non-defensively.
  13. To learn and demonstrate professional and ethical conduct in class and during interviewing activities and feedback sessions with fellow students and the course instructor.

Grading

  • Session recording, analysis, and critique 1 (10 min) 10%
  • Reflection and self-evaluation paper 1 5%
  • Session recording, analysis, and critique 2 (10 min) 20%
  • Reflection and self-evaluation paper 2 5%
  • Session recording, analysis, and critique 3 (15min) 40%
  • Reflection and self-evaluation paper 3 10%
  • Class attendance, participation, and collaborative learning 10%

NOTES:

There is no final exam for this course.

REQUIREMENTS:

Students are encouraged to keep a reflection journal – The instructor does not read the journals, and therefore they are not graded. However, this ‘practice’ is intended to help you write your reflection and self-evaluation papers mentioned above.

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

Young, M. (2017). Learning the Art of Helping: Building blocks and techniques (6th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson/Merrill Prentice Hall.
ISBN: 9780134165783

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Supplementary readings will be provided in class.

Registrar Notes:

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

TEACHING AT SFU IN FALL 2021

Teaching at SFU in fall 2021 will involve primarily in-person instruction, with approximately 70 to 80 per cent of classes in person/on campus, with safety plans in place.  Whether your course will be in-person or through remote methods will be clearly identified in the schedule of classes.  You will also know at enrollment whether remote course components will be “live” (synchronous) or at your own pace (asynchronous).

Enrolling in a course acknowledges that you are able to attend in whatever format is required.  You should not enroll in a course that is in-person if you are not able to return to campus, and should be aware that remote study may entail different modes of learning, interaction with your instructor, and ways of getting feedback on your work than may be the case for in-person classes.

Students with hidden or visible disabilities who may need class or exam accommodations, including in the context of remote learning, are advised to register with the SFU Centre for Accessible Learning (caladmin@sfu.ca or 778-782-3112) as early as possible in order to prepare for the fall 2021 term.