Fall 2021 - HUM 231 D100

Daily Life in Ancient Greece and Rome (3)

Class Number: 4447

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Mo, We 3:30 PM – 4:50 PM
    AQ 4125, Burnaby

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Examines the social history of ancient Greece and Rome, particularly through the study of relevant artifacts, art, architecture, and ancient texts (in translation). Considers topics such as the lives of men, women, children and slaves; the home; dining; government; the economy; the army; death and burial; and entertainment. Students with credit for HS 231 or HUM 216 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities.

COURSE DETAILS:

When we study the ancient Greek and Roman civilizations, we often focus on major historical events, large scale buildings and the incredible works of art that have survived. Rarely, however, do we talk about the everyday lives of the individuals living within these societies. What did they eat? How did they bathe? What kind of activities did they enjoy?

This course presents a unique opportunity to examine the social history of ancient Greece and Rome, particularly through the study of relevant artifacts, art, architecture, and ancient texts (in translation). The course will consider how text and material culture can shed light on such topics as the lives of men, women, children and slaves; the home; dining; government; the economy; the army; death and burial; and entertainment. The course will draw parallels between Greek and Roman society, as well between the ancient and modern world.

The course is organized both chronologically and thematically, forming two overarching units:

  1. Daily life in Greece
  2. Daily life in Rome

Breadth-Humanities.

Grading

  • Assignments 30%
  • Midterm 30%
  • Final Project (Podcast & Working Notes) 40%

NOTES:

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community. Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

Students with hidden or visible disabilities who believe they may need classroom or exam accommodations are encouraged to register with the SFU Centre for Students with Disabilities (1250 Maggie Benston Centre) as soon as possible to ensure that they are eligible and that approved accommodations and services are implemented in a timely fashion.

Deferred grades will be given only on the basis of authenticated medical disability.

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

Garland, R. Daily Life of the Ancient Greeks (Indianapolis: Hackett, 2014)

Aldrete, G. Daily Life in the Roman City: Rome, Pompeii, and Ostia, Revised Edition (University of Oklahoma Press, 2008)


Registrar Notes:

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

TEACHING AT SFU IN FALL 2021

Teaching at SFU in fall 2021 will involve primarily in-person instruction, with approximately 70 to 80 per cent of classes in person/on campus, with safety plans in place.  Whether your course will be in-person or through remote methods will be clearly identified in the schedule of classes.  You will also know at enrollment whether remote course components will be “live” (synchronous) or at your own pace (asynchronous).

Enrolling in a course acknowledges that you are able to attend in whatever format is required.  You should not enroll in a course that is in-person if you are not able to return to campus, and should be aware that remote study may entail different modes of learning, interaction with your instructor, and ways of getting feedback on your work than may be the case for in-person classes.

Students with hidden or visible disabilities who may need class or exam accommodations, including in the context of remote learning, are advised to register with the SFU Centre for Accessible Learning (caladmin@sfu.ca or 778-782-3112) as early as possible in order to prepare for the fall 2021 term.