Fall 2021 - SA 887 G100

Special Topics in Sociology/Anthropology (5)

Indigenous-SettlerRelations

Class Number: 6673

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Tu 4:30 PM – 8:20 PM
    WMC 3210, Burnaby

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

An advanced seminar devoted to an in-depth examination of a topic not regularly offered by the department.

COURSE DETAILS:

Indigenous-settler relations is a broad area of study that entails the structured inequalities that been built in the colonial past and present, but also the analysis and hope for resurgence and decolonization. This course is concerned with providing an understanding of the contemporary state of Indigenous relations with settlers by examining the different spaces, knowledges, and relationalities produced in this in this relationship. The course is interdisciplinary and builds on a number of broad themes found in sociology of Indigenous people, Indigenous studies, Indigenous political theory, settler-colonial studies, and critical legal theory. The course begins by posing the question of the problem of Indigenous-settler relations informed by Indigenous thinkers, and framed by concerns, knowledges, and theories from Indigenous scholars and allies. Some of the specific questions we will grapple with in this course include racism, whiteness, property, and possession; conflicts over land, borders, and mapping; the science, spatiality, and biopolitics of Indigenous identity; and the role of numbers, budgets and taxes in relation to Indigenous-Canada relations. The course ends with discussion of the future of reconciliation, decolonization, allyship and future of Indigenous sovereignty in the context of Indigenous-settler relationship building.

Grading

  • Reflection paper 15%
  • Participation 25%
  • Document analysis 25%
  • Final paper 35%

NOTES:

Academic Dishonesty and Misconduct Policy: The Department of Sociology & Anthropology follows SFU policy in relation to grading practices, grade appeals (Policy T 20.01) and academic dishonesty and misconduct procedures (S10.01‐S10.04). Unless otherwise informed by your instructor in writing, in graded written assignments you must cite the sources you rely on and include a bibliography/list of references, following an instructor-approved citation style.  It is the responsibility of students to inform themselves of the content of SFU policies available on the SFU website.

Centre for Accessible Learning: Students with hidden or visible disabilities who believe they may need classroom or exam accommodations are encouraged to register with the SFU Centre for Accessible Learning (1250 Maggie Benston Centre) as soon as possible to ensure that they are eligible and that approved accommodations and services are implemented in a timely fashion.

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

All readings will be available through Canvas, the SFU Library, or online as noted.

Graduate Studies Notes:

Important dates and deadlines for graduate students are found here: http://www.sfu.ca/dean-gradstudies/current/important_dates/guidelines.html. The deadline to drop a course with a 100% refund is the end of week 2. The deadline to drop with no notation on your transcript is the end of week 3.

Registrar Notes:

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

TEACHING AT SFU IN FALL 2021

Teaching at SFU in fall 2021 will involve primarily in-person instruction, with approximately 70 to 80 per cent of classes in person/on campus, with safety plans in place.  Whether your course will be in-person or through remote methods will be clearly identified in the schedule of classes.  You will also know at enrollment whether remote course components will be “live” (synchronous) or at your own pace (asynchronous).

Enrolling in a course acknowledges that you are able to attend in whatever format is required.  You should not enroll in a course that is in-person if you are not able to return to campus, and should be aware that remote study may entail different modes of learning, interaction with your instructor, and ways of getting feedback on your work than may be the case for in-person classes.

Students with hidden or visible disabilities who may need class or exam accommodations, including in the context of remote learning, are advised to register with the SFU Centre for Accessible Learning (caladmin@sfu.ca or 778-782-3112) as early as possible in order to prepare for the fall 2021 term.