Spring 2021 - HIST 476 D100

History of Modern Greece (4)

Class Number: 5723

Delivery Method: Remote

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Tu 2:30 PM – 6:20 PM
    REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby

  • Prerequisites:

    45 units, including 6 units of lower division history or by permission of instructor.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Introduces students to the social and political history of modern Greece, with a focus on current developments through the examination of political, social, and economic transformations over the past two centuries, and help students situate modern Greek history within a European context. The course will examine the various political, social, and economic crises the modern Greek state has endured from its founding in 1830 to the present, using primary and secondary sources to understand the historical development of Greece. Students with credit for HS/HIST 307 under the topic "Glory to Debt" or HS 476 may not take this course for further credit.

COURSE DETAILS:

The primary focus of this course is the political, economic, and social history of modern Greece with a secondary focus on cultural aspects and transformations. We will examine the various crises the Modern Greek State has endured from its founding in 1830 to the present, from political crises (army coups, dictatorships, civil wars, national crises and wars), to social crises (resettlement of refugees, immigration and emigration), and economic crises. We will use the current economic and political circumstances as a springboard to examine Modern Greek history and the transformations (or reactions) that earlier policies and crises generated, and will place such developments within the context of European history. No prerequisites are necessary to take the course though a basic knowledge of modern European history will be useful. The course aims to introduce students to the social and political history of modern Greece, help them understand current developments through the examination of political, social, and economic transformations over the past two centuries, and help them situate modern Greek history within a European context. We will examine a variety of perspectives and arguments in historiography primarily through secondary sources, and students will learn how to use different arguments and positions in their own work.

Grading

  • Class attendance and participation 20%
  • Readings Analysis 25%
  • Academic Interview/Podcast 25%
  • Final Paper 30%

NOTES:

Teaching at SFU in the Spring of 2021 will be conducted primarily through remote methods.

The majority of the course will be synchronous but will not last the entire designated time slot (Tuesday 2:30-4:30). The time not used for discussion of the themes and readings for that week will be used for office hours and other course related needs. There will also be short presentations on the theme of the following week which students will be able to stream after the conclusion of the discussion or at their convenience prior to the next meeting.

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

Thomas W. Gallant Modern Greece: From the War of Independence to the Present.

All other required readings will be found on Canvas


Registrar Notes:

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

TEACHING AT SFU IN SPRING 2021

Teaching at SFU in spring 2021 will be conducted primarily through remote methods. There will be in-person course components in a few exceptional cases where this is fundamental to the educational goals of the course. Such course components will be clearly identified at registration, as will course components that will be “live” (synchronous) vs. at your own pace (asynchronous). Enrollment acknowledges that remote study may entail different modes of learning, interaction with your instructor, and ways of getting feedback on your work than may be the case for in-person classes. To ensure you can access all course materials, we recommend you have access to a computer with a microphone and camera, and the internet. In some cases your instructor may use Zoom or other means requiring a camera and microphone to invigilate exams. If proctoring software will be used, this will be confirmed in the first week of class.

Students with hidden or visible disabilities who believe they may need class or exam accommodations, including in the current context of remote learning, are encouraged to register with the SFU Centre for Accessible Learning (caladmin@sfu.ca or 778-782-3112).