Spring 2023 - BISC 424 D100

Applied Genomics (3)

Class Number: 1859

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Mo, We, Fr 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
    AQ 5016, Burnaby

  • Prerequisites:

    BISC 101, BISC 102, BISC 202, MBB 222, MBB 231, and either BISC 357 or MBB 331; all with a grade of C- or better.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

The course provides an overview of "omics" methods in large-scale identification of gene functions in various organisms, and demonstrates how this knowledge can be applied in genomics fields, including plant and animal breeding. Students who have taken Special Topics BISC 471 Applied Genomics may not take this course for further credit.

COURSE DETAILS:

Genetic methodology has evolved from studying single genes to sequencing all genes and identifying most genes involved in specific processes. These genomics methodologies are finding applications in research fields such as development, physiology, ecology, and anthropology, and also in applied research and development ranging from medicine to infectious disease and pest control, and breeding. Differently from common perception, these technologies are not necessarily more difficult than previous technologies and do offer jobs with specializations ranging from lab bench work to interpretation of data on computers, to applying findings, for example in counselling of genetic disease patients. 

Grading

  • • midterm 30%
  • • tutorials 40%
  • • final Project 30%

Materials

MATERIALS + SUPPLIES:

Lecture powerpoint presentations and recordings, pdf files.

REQUIRED READING:

The course will be based on primary research literature and reviews.


REQUIRED READING NOTES:

Your personalized Course Material list, including digital and physical textbooks, are available through the SFU Bookstore website by simply entering your Computing ID at: shop.sfu.ca/course-materials/my-personalized-course-materials.

Registrar Notes:

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS

SFU’s Academic Integrity website http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating. Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the university community. Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the university. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the university. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html