Spring 2023 - CMNS 443 D100

Comparative Asian Media Systems (4)

Class Number: 1417

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Mo 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
    HCC 1325, Vancouver

  • Prerequisites:

    75 units. Recommended: CMNS 230 or CMNS 240; and one of CMNS 201W (201 or 260), or CMNS 202 (or 262).

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Offers a basis for understanding different Asian media systems in concrete historical, political and socio-economic contexts. Introduces students to a range of epistemological and theoretical issues in media systems in a vast and extremely diverse region that is undergoing a period of rapid political, economic, social and cultural transformation. Provides an overview of issues relating to different media systems and case studies of media and politics in specific countries in the region.

COURSE DETAILS:

This course offers a basis for understanding different Asian media systems in concrete historical, political, cultural and socio-economic contexts. It introduces students to a range of epistemological and theoretical issues in studying media systems in a vast and extremely diverse region that is undergoing a period of rapid political, economic, social, and cultural transformation. It will provide both an overview of issues relating to different media systems and case studies of media and politics in specific countries in the region. Students will learn to respond to real Asian problems, identify the forces shaping the Asian information and entertainment systems and master key conceptual frameworks drawn from the humanities and social sciences.

COURSE-LEVEL EDUCATIONAL GOALS:

By the end of the course, students will be able to:

  • Discuss the complexity and diversity of media systems in the region and describe the media systems in a number of Asian countries.
  • Acquire a greater appreciation of the range of media/state relationships in Asia and develop an initial understanding of the relationship between Asian media, society, and culture.
  • Understand the complicated ways in which the media intersect with processes of political democratization and commercialization in different countries.

Grading

  • Attendance/participation 10%
  • Leading a Seminar Discussion 20%
  • Mid-term 35%
  • Final Paper 35%

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

Jin, Dal Yong (2022). Global South Discourse in East Asian Media Studies. London: Routledge (online access available).

Materials will be placed on reserve and/or made available via the Internet.

REQUIRED READING NOTES:

Your personalized Course Material list, including digital and physical textbooks, are available through the SFU Bookstore website by simply entering your Computing ID at: shop.sfu.ca/course-materials/my-personalized-course-materials.

Registrar Notes:

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS

SFU’s Academic Integrity website http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating. Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the university community. Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the university. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the university. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html