Spring 2023 - PLAN 100 D100

Introduction to Planning (3)

Class Number: 2795

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
    AQ 3005, Burnaby

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Students will be exposed to a broad overview of the field of planning. The course will introduce students to the role of a planner while exploring the practice of planning (human settlements and community planning) in varying contexts within Canada and internationally. Students with credit for PLAN 200 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

COURSE-LEVEL EDUCATIONAL GOALS:

After completing PLAN 100, students will be able to:

  • Broadly define what planning is;
  • Identify the multifaceted roles and ethical responsibilities of a planner;
  • Describe the role of planning in various contexts;
  • Identify and describe core planning theories and tools;
  • Describe the environmental and social impact of various planning interventions; and
  • Identify and describe some significant urban and environmental design theories and tools.

Grading

  • Assignments 90%
  • Participation and attendance 10%

Materials

MATERIALS + SUPPLIES:

Students will need a computer and access to the internet.

REQUIRED READING:

There are several core resources to support your learning in this course:
 - Course Required Readings
 - Course Required Videos
All the required and recommended readings and videos are listed within their respective study modules in Canvas.

REQUIRED READING NOTES:

Your personalized Course Material list, including digital and physical textbooks, are available through the SFU Bookstore website by simply entering your Computing ID at: shop.sfu.ca/course-materials/my-personalized-course-materials.

Registrar Notes:

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS

SFU’s Academic Integrity website http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating. Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the university community. Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the university. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the university. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html