The talk series organized by the Visual Art area at the Alexander studios provides a productive place for artists to present their work and to talk about their methods and concepts. Also, to engage with visual culture in a broader way, the series features curators and other cultural producers to present their projects and ideas. With approximately four talks per term, the series provides the possibility for our students and the public to engage in discussions with the visitors and explore contemporary art and its contexts and theories.



2010

Amie Siegel

Amie Siegel

Born 1974 in Chicago, Illinois, Amie Siegel lives and works in Berlin, New York and Cambridge, MA. She received her MFA from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago and BA from Bard College.
Amie Siegel works variously in 16mm and 35mm film, video, sound and writing. Siegel uses the cinematic image as material means to a conceptual end. Her work mines the voyeuristic gaze, direct address and interview to consider how these repetitions shape cultural memory. In multi-channel video and film installations, Siegel reformulates cinematic enterprises—including the establishing shot, the remake and the tracking shot—as uncanny reflections on absence, historical disorientation and nostalgia. Longer videos and feature films move between spontaneous and scripted spaces, truth and fiction, shifting performance from identification to parody and estrangement.
Exhibitions and screenings include The Russian Linesman, The Hayward, London; 2008 Whitney Biennial, Whitney Museum of American Art; Forum Expanded, KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Berlin; Austrian Film Museum, Berlin International Film Festival, Pacific Film Archive, Berkeley; Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Andy Warhol Museum, BFI Southbank, Frankfurt Film Museum and Film Forum in New York. Her first book of poetry, The Waking Life (North Atlantic Books, Berkeley, CA) was published in 1999. Siegel teaches in the Department of Visual and Environmental Studies at Harvard University. She has been a guest of the DAAD Berliner-Künstlerprogramm and is a recent recipient of the Guggenheim Fellowship. www.amiesiegel.net
DDR/DDR by Amie Siegel will be presented by DIM Cinema at the Pacific Cinémathèque on Monday November 15 at 7:30pm. $10 + $3 membership. 1131 Howe St. www.dimcinema.ca for details.  Thanks to Amy Lynn Kazymerchyk

Susanne Kriemann

Susanne Kriemann

Born 1972, in Erlangen, Germany, Susanne Kriemann explores the representation of historical events through photography, text, and installation.
Kriemann takes a research-oriented approach, often integrating her own photographs with archival materials and found digital images. Recognizing that much of 20th century history is understood through collections of images and documents she explores not only the narrative potential of photographs in human imagination and interpretation of the past, but their constructed nature. Kriemann is interested in changing perspectives on already established images through the juxtaposition fact and fiction. By combining images from various sources, seemingly neutral images reveal themselves as being charged with meaning.
Kriemann studied at the Kunstakademie in Stuttgart and at the Ecole Nationale Superieure des Beaux Arts in Paris, and currently resides in Rotterdam and Berlin.
Recently she has had solo exhibitions at the Stedelijk Museum Bureau Amsterdam, in the Galerie Wilfried Lentz, Rotterdam and at Uqbar Berlin (all 2009). Her work was also included in group exhibitions at the Ursula Blickle Stiftung in Kraichtal, “Berlin89/09? at the Berlinische Galerie, at the Fotomuseum Rotterdam, and she participated in the 5th Berlin Biennial. In 2009, a monograph “One Time One Million” was published by Roma Publications, Amsterdam. Kriemann is in Vancouver to participate in group show Following A Line at the Contemporary Art Gallery.

Marjetica Potrč

Marjetica Potrč

Marjetica Potrč is the first artist to be hosted by the Audain Visual Artists in Residence Program and will begin her residency in October 2010. The Audain Artist-in-Residence will work closely with visual-art students within the School for the Contemporary Arts at SFU Woodward’s and the community in Vancouver.
Marjetica Potrč's work has been featured in exhibitions throughout Europe and the Americas, including the São Paulo Biennial in Brazil (1996 and 2006) and the Venice Biennial (1993, 2003, and 2009); and she has had solo shows at the Guggenheim Museum in New York (2001); the Max Protetch Gallery in New York (2002, 2005, 2008 and 2010); the Nordenhake Gallery in Berlin/Stockholm (2003, 2007 and 2010). Potrč has taught at numerous institutions in Europe and North America, including MIT (2005). In 2000 she received the prestigious Hugo Boss prize, and was awarded a fellowship at the Vera List Center for Arts and Politics at The New School in New York (2007).

Ruben Ortiz-Torres

Ruben Ortiz-Torres

"Over the last few years, I have been working with hydraulic mechanics and different customizing techniques to alter objects and adapt them to particular and specific cultural, political and aesthetic needs. These objects and paintings refer to high modernism but also subvert it and play with it thereby establishing a dialogue with specific cultural and subcultural practices and social interaction. More recently, I have been exploring different materials that have the capacity to change, such as chromaluscent paints that change color when the angle of reflection of the light changes and heat sensitive paints that change color when touched. These materials when applied to paintings and objects result in artworks that mutate, transform and adapt their own identities. My “monochrome” paintings are a good example of this. I have been experimenting with chromaluscent painting that changes color as the spectator moves when its pigment refracts light from different angles. I experimented this time with chromaluscent chrome and flake called Prizmacoat. I have been working with a company in Los Angeles that develops these materials for car customizers.
The most ambitious piece of the series is a museum bench that is also a sculptural object. It is painted with thermosensitive painting that reacts to changes in temperature. Its color varies when touched from a purple to a brighter pink. Therefore its design varies and it is made when people use it, seat on it or touch it leaving their mark. It resembles formally a minimalist sculpture but it requires social participation and interaction to exist. Unlike some other purist modernist art it is playful and sensual. Now I am producing a couple of new benches for an exhibition of Los Angeles artists at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles.
These pieces are in constant flux changing in response to light, temperature and participation. These seductive materials relate to certain art practices common to California such as the “Fetish Finish” school of minimalism and are usually used in car customizing. I have used and learned about these materials working with low riders in Southern California. However the artwork also relates to another art tradition that I would like to emphasize. Latin America created its own modernisms, often addressing social, emotional or spiritual concerns.
My goal is not to create art for art sake or pure seductive spectacle. Abstraction in this case is not meant to be a homogenizing universalistic absence of language but on the contrary. I want to use color and surface as part of a liberating lexicon with a rich history and culture beyond the galleries and museums."
Ruben Ortiz-Torres was born in Mexico City in 1964. Educated within the utopian models of republican Spanish anarchism soon confronted the tragedies and cultural clashes of post colonial third world. Being the son of a couple of Latin American folklore musicians he soon identified more with the noises of urban punk music. After giving up the dream of playing baseball in the major leagues and some architecture training (Harvard Graduate School of Design) he decided to study art. He went first to the oldest and one of the most academic art schools of the Americas (the Academy of San Carlos in Mexico City) and later to one of the newest and more experimental (Calarts in Valencia CA). After enduring Mexico City's earthquake and pollution he moved to Los Angeles with a Fullbright grant to survive riots, fires, floods, more earthquakes, shootings and proposition 187. He still hangs around school but now as a Faculty member of the University of California in San Diego. During all this he has been able to produce artwork in the form of paintings, photographs, objects, sculptures, custom cars and machines, installations, videos, films, text and opera. He has participated in several international exhibitions and film festivals. His work is in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Museums of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles and San Diego, the California Museum of Photography in Riverside CA, the Museo Universitario de Arte Contemporaneo in Mexico City, the Jumex collection and the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía in Madrid Spain among others. He was a member of the Sistema Nacional de Creadores and has won international awards such as the Andrea Frank Foundation Award, the Foundation for Contemporary Performance Arts in New York, the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Award, the C.O.L.A. Individual Artist Fellowship, etc.
After showing his work around the world and be living abroad, he now finally realizes that his parents music was in fact better than most rock’n roll.

Kathy Slade

Kathy Slade

Kathy Slade is an artist who works with embroidery, sound,sculpture, books, film, and video. She has exhibited in Canada, the US,China, Europe, and the UK. In 2009 Slade received the Jack and Doris Shadbolt Foundation VIVA Award.
Slade is the Founding Editor of the Emily Carr University Press. In 1999 she developed READ Books at the Charles H. Scott Gallery. Slade collaborates with Brady Cranfield on their ongoing project The Music Appreciation Society and as Cranfield & Slade whose concept album titled 12 Sun Songs was Released in 2009 (Or Gallery, Vancouver and Christoph Keller Editions, Zurich).
In 2010 Slade's work will be included in Cue: Artists' Video at the Vancouver Art Gallery, Die Perfekte Ausstellung at the Heidelberger Kunstverein, and she will have a solo project at the Audain Gallery as part of Coming Soon. Cranfield & Slade will release 10 Riot Songs (Presentation House Gallery and Bywater Brothers Editions, Toronto) upcoming in the fall.

Rebecca Belmore

Rebecca Belmore

Rebecca Belmore was born in 1960 into a large Anishinabe family in Upsala, Ontario. She attended the Ontario College of Art and Design in Toronto; she currently lives and works in Vancouver, BC.
Belmore's work has been exhibited and performed internationally and across Canada since the late 80's, including solo exhibitions at the Vancouver Art Gallery: Rising to the Occasion (2008), The Named and Unnamed (2002) at Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, Vancouver and 33 Pieces (2001) at Blackwood Gallery University of Toronto at Mississauga. In 2005, she was chosen to be Canada's official representative at the 51st Venice Biennale, with Fountain; she was the first Aboriginal woman to represent Canada. In 2004, Rebecca Belmore was awarded the prestigous VIVA Award from the Jack and Doris Shadbolt Foundation, and in 2009 she received an award for outstanding achievement from the Hnatyshyn Foundation.
Rebecca Belmore's performances, sculptures, installations, and photographs address issues of identity as they relate to the politics of history, place, culture, and gender. Her work uses the body and the land as site of contestation, addressing a history of colonialization and the continued conflict and struggle of the first-nations people in Canada. Belmore's gestures and objects often speak on behalf of what is marginalized, absent, forgotten or untold. In her work Vigil, (2002) Belmore memorialized the lives of 50 women, most of whom were Aboriginal, who had gone missing in Vancouver's Downtown East Side. Belmore performed a violent and passionate tribute to the lost women, tearing thorns off of roses with her teeth and nailing her red dress to a telephone pole before ripping it piece by piece off of her body. It was a cleansing of negative connotations attached to identity, and of her personal grief bound to these missing Aboriginal women.
Recently, she exhibited a photo-based work, titled: Sister at the Simon Fraser University Audain Gallery in the group exhibition: First Nations/ Second Nature. On April 24th, Belmore's exhibition Friend or Foe, a collaboration with Terrance Houle, will be presented at the Or Gallery in Vancouver.

Arthur Renwick

Arthur Renwick

Arthur Renwick, a member of Gallery 44 and the Haisla First Nation, was born and raised in Kitimat, BC. He is a graduate of Emily Carr College of Art and Design, Vancouver (1989) and received and MFA from Concordia University, Montreal (1993). He has curated art exhibitions at The Power Plant in Toronto. In the Canadian Mountain Academy of the Arts in Elliot Lake, he assisted in developing the curriculum, designing the darkroom, and taught various art courses (1997-2000).
His artwork has exhibited nationally and internationally, and is represented in many private and public collections. His practice explores cultural identity and colonization. His early work explored the impact of industry on the landscape and society, most likely influenced by the presence of Alcan's aluminum smelter in his hometown of Kitimat. Despite the weighty politics, Renwick's work is never didactic or literal; the play of meaning is always rooted in the visual and poetic. Often his guides in this enterprise are the forms and ideas present in Northwest Coast totem poles, complex records of family history, status, and tradition.
Renwick was awarded the K.M. Hunter Artists Award in 2005. Recent solo exhibitions include Mask: Artists and Curators (2009), at the Leo Kamen Gallery in Toronto, Delegates: Chiefs of the Earth and Sky (2008-13) as part of ANECO Public Art Projects, Shaw Centre, Saskatoon, and BC CHURCHS: And the word was (2007) at the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto. He is in Vancouver to launch his exhibition, Mask, which will be displayed at the Richmond Art Gallery from January 29th to April 4th.