The talk series organized by the Visual Art area at the Alexander studios provides a productive place for artists to present their work and to talk about their methods and concepts. Also, to engage with visual culture in a broader way, the series features curators and other cultural producers to present their projects and ideas. With approximately four talks per term, the series provides the possibility for our students and the public to engage in discussions with the visitors and explore contemporary art and its contexts and theories.



2011

Gareth James

Gareth James

James’s work is constituted through his abiding interest in histories of iconoclasm in which the social divisions and inequities that mark and delimit artistic practice are registered most emphatically. In James’ practice as an artist and as a writer, conventional aesthetic discourse is lost and rediscovered in neighboring fields such as topology or psychoanalysis; capitalist property relations are seen to exert as much determinative force on the visual field as phenomenological bodies; and theoretical materials are indistinct from physical ones in an incipient philosophy of materials. In his teaching, James incorporates a wide base of theoretical paradigms and experimental methodologies in order to examine the fullest extension of the field of art.
James was a founding member of Orchard, a cooperatively organized gallery in New York's Lower East side from 2005-2008, and is a founding editor, along with fellow artists Sam Lewitt and Cheyney Thompson, of Scorched Earth, a forthcoming journal devoted to questions concerning drawing. His work has been exhibited widely in the United States and Europe, including Portikus (Frankfurt), Kunstwerke (Berlin), The Institute of Contemporary Art (London), PS1 Center for Contemporary Art and the Museum of Modern Art (New York). He has had recent solo exhibitions at Galerie Christian Nagel, Köln; Franco Soffiantino Arte Contemporanea, Torino; and Elizabeth Dee Gallery, New York.
His writing has been published in journals such as Artforum, Texte zur Kunst, Afterall, and Made in USA, and he has curated several exhibitions, including a traveling retrospective of the television and video works of Jean-Luc Godard. James' publications include "I said I love. That is the promise." (published by b-books (Berlin) and Oejiblikket (Copenhagen) 2003; and "... Ical Krbbr Prodly Prsnts Gart Jas, Jon Klsy, Josf Stra," published by Walther König (Köln) 2006.

Mungo Thomson

Mungo Thomson

Mungo Thomson’s work pairs a West Coast conceptual sensibility with an interest in culture, cosmology and reception. In Thomson’s diverse art—films, sound work, sculpture, installation, drawing, photography and publications—simple processes of inversion and transformation are joined with an expansive sense of space and context.
Thomson attended the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program and the UCLA MFA program. He has had solo exhibitions at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2008); the Kadist Art Foundation, Paris (2007); and Galleria d’Arte Moderna e Contemporanea (GAMeC), Bergamo, Italy (2006). He participated in the Istanbul Biennial (2011), the Whitney Biennial (2008), and the Performa Biennial of Visual Art Performance (2005).
His book Font Study (TIME) was published by Los Angeles County Museum of Art (2011) and Negative Space was published by Christoph Keller Editions and JRP|Ringier (2006).

Janice Kerbel

Janice Kerbel

Kerbel’s work is often produced in relation to existing logic systems, re-con_guring organising structures to better de_ne the relationship between reality, imagination
and illusion. Her works range from installations to book projects, prints and audio works. In 2006, Kerbel wrote Nick Silver Can’t Sleep, a radio play for insomniacs
produced by Artangel and broadcast on Radio 3. Most recently, Kerbel completed Kill the Workers (2011), which takes its cue from dramatic narrative but is executed
solely by theatrical lighting.
Janice Kerbel is a Canadian artist who has been living and working in London since 1995. Recent solo exhibitions include Chisenhale Gallery, London; Badischer Kunstverein, Karlsrhue Germany; Art Now, Tate Britain;  Greengrassi, London; and Moderna Museet, Stockholm.
She has taught at the Slade School of Fine Art, London, California Institute of the Arts, Los Angeles and Goldsmiths College. She is currently artist in residence at Emily Carr, and working toward a solo exhibition at Presentation House later this year.

Renato Rodrigues da Silva

Renato Rodrigues da Silva

The title of Renato Rodrigues da Silva's talk is: "Hélio Oiticica's Parangolé or the Art of Transgression", and is based on an article published in Third Text. Please notice that it is very important that the students read the text beforehand, since the talk will introduce the parameters of analysis.
This article focuses on Hélio Oiticica's most important proposal, the Parangolés, which were realized from 1964/5 until the end of his life, in 1980. It shows that this proposal was presented in various forms and objects, and that it multiplied its meanings according to the context, being understood through Jacques Lacan's theory of the gaze and psychological individuality. In a series of analyses of Oiticica's performances at Favela da Mangueira, which is a slum in Rio de Janeiro, and at the Museum of Modern Art of Rio de Janeiro, the
article demonstrates that the artist has developed an early form of institutional critique.
Renato Rodrigues da Silva is Adjunct Faculty a the Latin American Studies Program, Simon Fraser University, holding a Ph.D. in Art History from the University of Texas at Austin.
He published the book Modern Photography in Brazil (which is now in its second edition), besides articles in Leonardo Journal, Third Text, Fillip and BorderCrossings, among other magazines. His current research focuses on Brazilian Neoconcretism, and he is writing a book on its interdisciplinary proposals.

Neil Campbell

Neil Campbell

Painting directly on to the wall, Neil Campbell transforms the gallery's interior with his geometric shapes and patterning. The artist intervenes in the architecture, toying with the experience of the space and addressing questions of viewer perception. Letting intuition guide the process, the artist divines 'sweet spots' within the exhibition space, scaling his shapes and situating them in the locales he deems most harmonic. A massive inverted triangle dominates the main gallery, while fields of small circles pulsate in the front gallery.
Despite the flatness of the painted form, the scale of the triangle coupled with its impenetrable blackness produces an overwhelming, almost vertiginous effect. The matte planes seem only to highlight and heighten the vibration felt from the looming shape. Campbell's varying circles oscillate between evoking a sensation of drawing energy away from the viewer and projecting a kinetic force outward. The negative space between the dots in turn retains its own knot of energy. Inspired initially by how various cultures privileged a specific center along the vertical axis of the human figure, the artist explains that his work addresses "the electric field of the body."
Neil Campbell was born in Saskatchewan and currently lives and works in Vancouver.
His work has appeared in galleries and institutions in Canada, the United States and abroad, including the Vancouver Art Gallery (for which, in 2005/2006, he produced the remarkable BASE/MACHINE, a light installation in the gallery façade); Centre d'art Contemporain, Montreal; The Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver; Andrea Rosen Gallery, New York, and Art and Public, Geneva. He recently had a solo exhibition at Galeria Franco Noero in Turin, Italy.

Holly Ward

Holly Ward

The Pavilion was a year-long project completed as the Langara College 2009-2010 Artist In residence. During this time, Ward constructed a 22’ diameter geodesic dome intended to serve as a catalyst for speculative thinking and artistic experimentation. Once the construction of The Pavilion was complete, Ward curated a series of exhibitions, readings and performances in order to generate contemporary engagements with utopian thinking, experimentation and dialogue.
Holly Ward is a Vancouver-based interdisciplinary artist working with sculpture, multimedia installation, architecture and drawing as a means to examine representations of social progress and the utopian imaginary. She received her BFA (interdisciplinary) from the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design in 1999 and her MFA (studio) from the University of Guelph in 2006.
Ward has exhibited in solo shows across Canada at the Morris and Helen Belkin Gallery, the Or Gallery in Vancouver, and YYZ Gallery, Toronto amongst others. She has participated in group exhibitions in Canada, England, Mexico, the US, Norway and South Korea. She is currently represented by Republic Gallery, Vancouver where she had a solo exhibition in 2009. For her 2009-2010 Langara College Artist in Residence project in Vancouver, Ward constructed a 22’ diameter geodesic dome to act as host to a series of exhibitions, readings, workshops and experimental performances.

Terence Gower

Terence Gower

Terence Gower’s Ciudad Moderna (2004) explores the city as a built environment by using clips from the source film Despedida de Casada (Dir. Juan de Orduna): through a process of re-editing, Gower isolates the architecture by transforming scenes into perspective renderings that highlight the modernist architecture of Mexico, such as the Museum of Anthropology and the Hotel Presidente in Acapulco.
Ciudad Moderna is part of the exhibition The Long Take: Videos on Architecture and Social Space at the Audain Gallery. The group exhibition gathers national and international artists whose work seek to represent the scales, angles and details of architecture and the urban territory as well as the more hidden relations of the city, such as gender and space and the effects of socio economic processes. The large-scale projections of these works will transform the space of the Audain Gallery and the show opens up a discussion of urban imagibility and artistic strategies of representation.
Terence Gower is a Canadian artist based in New York City. He has exhibited his work in galleries and museums in the US (Storefront for Art and Architecture, New York; PS1 Contemporary Art Center, New York; ICA, Boston; UCLA Hammer Museum, LA; Queens Museum, New York ), Mexico City (La Colección Jumex; Museo de Arte Carrillo Gil; Museo del Chopo; Galería Arte Mexicano; Laboratorio Arte Alameda), Canada (The Power Plant, Toronto; Gallery 101, Ottawa; Artspeak, Vancouver), Germany (Galerie für Zeitgenössische Kunst, Leipzig; Galerie M+R Fricke, Berlin; Kunsthistorisches Institut, Bonn, Kunstverein, Göttingen), France (Galerie Yvon Lambert, and Centre Culturel du Mexique, Paris), and Latin America (XIII Bienal de la Habana, Cuba; XI Mostra da Gravura, Curitiba, Brazil; and Centro Recoleta, Buenos Aires).  His videos have been screened at Yvon Lambert, Paris; Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid; iMage Architecture and Media Festival, Florence, Italy; Instituto Cervantes, New York; Espai d'Art Contemporani de Castelló, Spain, and LOOP Video Fair, Barcelona.
Gower has curated exhibitions for several museums and art centres such as Museo de Arte Carrillo Gil (Prácticas públicas/Vidas privadas), El Museo del Barrio, New York (The Conceptual Trend), Museo de la Ciudad de México (Pasaje Iturbide), Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art (The Counterfeit Subject), and the San Francisco Art Institute (Tendencies). He has published seven editions and multiples (most recently, Kitchen I&II) and has created public projects for Cologne, Germany, Mexico City, and New York City.
Terence Gower is represented by Galerie M+R Fricke, Berlin and Düsseldorf: http://www.galeriefricke.de/