The talk series organized by the Visual Art area at the Alexander studios provides a productive place for artists to present their work and to talk about their methods and concepts. Also, to engage with visual culture in a broader way, the series features curators and other cultural producers to present their projects and ideas. With approximately four talks per term, the series provides the possibility for our students and the public to engage in discussions with the visitors and explore contemporary art and its contexts and theories.



2012

HyungMin Yoon

HyungMin Yoon

“Through my art practice, I seek to develop the potential for art to reveal the ambiguities and contradictions that lie hidden in what is taken for granted in the everyday experience.
Having recently immigrated to Vancouver, my focus has shifted to the specific challenges faced by global nomadic citizens who encounter new languages, customs and tacit social agreements. Translation Services was developed as a part of Curatorial Residencies program with 221A. The project presented three international artists’ practices, a workshop with ESL children and a publication in order to explore translation in a new way; rather than as the process of representing an essential origin, as a beguiling, contentious space for abstraction and emergent cultural production.”
HyungMin Yoon received her BFA from the Korean National University of Arts in Seoul and her MFA from Chelsea College, University of the Arts London. Her first work produced in Vancouver was Heaven and Earth, a floating public pond art project at Dr Sun-Yat Sen Chinese Garden in 2011. Yoon’s works have been exhibited internationally in Korea, Switzerland and the UK. Yoon was a 2011/12 curatorial resident at 221A in Vancouver.

Cathy Busby

Cathy Busby

About Face, Portraits of Benjamin Strong and Fisher Howe as found in storage room at Union Theological Seminary, 2012

“My installations and printed matter address both the physical and discursive space of a project. For example, I work with collections ranging from artworks to advertising slogans (Atrium, Halifax 2010; About Face, New York 2012; Totalled, Ottawa 2004; Inspiring, Halifax 2010). I commemorate little-remembered events (We Are Sorry, Melbourne 2009 / Winnipeg 2010; In Conversation with “They Chose China,” Beijing 2010; Harriet Nahanee, Vancouver 2010). I often use un- or underused spaces (24/7, Aberdeen 2008; Move In Now, Halifax 2010). I begin by re-framing, re-locating, re-organizing and re-purposing what is already there in order to heighten political awareness of taken-for-granted conditions.
One of my best-known works, We Are Sorry (Melbourne 2009 / Winnipeg 2010), commemorated public apologies by Canadian and Australian heads of state to the Indian Residential School survivors in Canada and the Stolen Generations in Australia. While these landmark apologies had been relatively fleeting media moments when they were first delivered, my work prolonged their public presence. In Melbourne, We Are Sorry took place outdoors as part of the Laneway Commissons and the following year it was presented in Eckhardt Hall at the Winnipeg Art Gallery in conjunction with the launch of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (2010).”

Cathy Busby is Canadian artist based in Halifax, Nova Scotia. She has a PhD in Communication (Concordia University, Montreal) and was a Fulbright Scholar at New York University. She has an MA in Media Studies (Concordia University) and a BFA from the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design. She has been exhibiting her work internationally over the past 20 years. Currently she is the artist in residence at Emily Carr University.

Manuel Piña

Manuel Piña

Manuel Pina, from the series CHRONOTYPES, Untiteled 1920 x 1080p

Earlier projects are mainly concerned with space. Current works incorporate time as a formal element in an attempt to articulate a discourse about contemporary human experience. My urban landscapes can be seen as a collection of signs and evidences gathered to create narratives about power, history and social relations.
Manuel Piña graduated as mechanical engineer in Vladimir, Russia in 1983. In the early 1990's, he started artistic practice. His photographs and video pieces often depict urban spaces as a departure point for narratives concerning social issues. He is interested in the relationships between power, utopias, history, and the city as both site and embodiment of these relationships. Manuel's work has been exhibited in the Americas and Europe including the Havana Biennale, the Istanbul Biennale, Kunsthalle Vienna, Grey Gallery, N.Y., LACMA, U.S.A., DAROS Museum, Zurich. He currently teaches in the Department of Fine Arts at UBC, Vancouver, and divides his time between Vancouver and Havana.

Aurélien Froment

Aurélien Froment

As a multidisciplinary visual artist, the works of Aurelien Froment take the form of video, performance, installation, photography, and publication. He has worked with mnemonics, puzzles, gesture, semantics, word play, and tricks to explore issues of memory, interpretation, perspective, and the relationship between images and words. In recent work, he has focused on the nature of presentation and audience expectation to create a new dialogue between people, places, and objects.
Aurélien Froment was born in Angers in 1976. Between 1995 and 2000,  he studied at ERBA in Nantes, while applying for a professional projectionist certificate. Training at both places gave him the chance to explore the components and peripheral elements of the cinematographic experience, and thus, to imagine a practice that follows its contours. His work has since developed through exhibitions, films, publications and performances. Solo presentations were realised with several organisations in recent years, including Les Laboratoires d'Aubervilliers, Project Arts Centre, FRAC Champagne-Ardenne, Palais de Tokyo, Centro Cultural Montehermoso, Gasworks, Wattis, Stuk, Centre Culturel Français de Milan, Le Credac, Musée d’art contemporain de Rochechouart and Pavilion. His work has been presented in group exhibitions including Tate Britain, Nam June Paik Centre, Basel Kunsthalle, Mudam, Centre Pompidou, Gwangju Biennale Sculpture Centre and Lyon Biennale.
This talk is realized with the support of the Contemporary Art Gallery and Consulate general of France in Vancouver.

Kota Ezawa

Kota Ezawa

Kota Ezawa, Hand Vote, 2008, wood and paint, Courtesy of the artist, photo: Ryan Thayer

Artist Kota Ezawa’s diverse projects take the form of digital animations, slide projections, lightboxes, paper cut-outs, intaglio etchings, ink drawings and wood sculptures. Using well-known images from the history of photography, film and the popular media, Ezawa’s pared down renderings speak to the iconic status of photography; despite the elimination of much information, the source is often still recognizable. Through this elaborate transformation of existing images, Ezawa’s work comments on the role of photography in shaping our perception of reality, the spectacular nature of the media and the limits of memory.
Kota Ezawa is a kind of video, film and photography archeologist,  making animations, still images and objects out of found archival footage. Ezawa’s projects have taken the form of digital animations, slide projections, lightboxes, paper cutouts, intaglio etchings, ink drawings and wood sculptures. His work has been shown in solo exhibitions at the Hayward Gallery in London; St. Louis Art Museum; Charles H. Scott Gallery, Vancouver; Artpace, San Antonio; and the Wadsworth Atheneum in Hartford. He has participated in group exhibitions at Museum of Modern Art, New York; Metropolitan Museum of Art; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh; Art Institute of Chicago; Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris; as well as the 5th Seoul International Biennale of Media Art and the 2004 Shanghai Biennale. Kota Ezawa lives in San Francisco and Berlin.