Young salmon may leap to 'oust the louse'  (Diane Mar-Nicolle, Aug 9, 2018)  “Everyone who has gone fishing has wondered why fish jump,” says John Reynolds, SFU professor of marine ecology. “Now, thanks to research by SFU undergraduate student Emma Atkinson, we have experimental proof that at least one of the reasons may be to remove external parasites.” Read more…

New method for detecting doping in cyclists proposed  (Diane Mar-Nicolle, July 9, 2018)  Athletes hoping to stay a step ahead of anti-doping science may have a new reason to be concerned. Simon Fraser University researcher David Clarke and his colleagues have devised a theoretical framework that could be used to detect cheaters. Read more…

A new kind of DNA structure from a disease-linked gene  (Faculty of Science, June 22, 2018)  Research is full of surprises, this time it’s a new form of DNA discovered by the Sen group at Simon Fraser University. Read more…

Revealing the dynamics of nanoparticle formation  (Faculty of Science, June 20, 2018)  The Gates group at Simon Fraser University presents new insights into the fascinating dynamics of how nanoparticles grow during a solution-phase process. Read more…

Enabling clean energy solutions through materials science  (Faculty of Science, June 8, 2018)  Simon Fraser University researchers have improved the efficiency of nickel based materials used in electrochemical reactions that are critical to the generation of some alternative sources of fuels. Read more…

Shining a light on the existence pattern for Costas arrays  (Faculty of Science, May 26, 2018)  Drs. Jedwab and Yen have made a major discovery in the construction of Costas arrays, from the perspective of their newly proposed Costas cubes. Read more…

Prime growing areas for B.C. oysters contain alarmingly high concentrations of plastic microbeads (SFU News, May 23, 2018)  According to new research from Simon Fraser University's Ecotoxicology Research Group, BC’s premier shellfish farming region is heavily contaminated with microplastics. Read more…

A few lost souls may help salmon populations thrive  (Faculty of Science, May 22, 2018)  Jonathan Moore and collaborators investigate how the level of stray fish can impact salmon populations. Read more…

Tuning low energy absorption via excited state interactions (Faculty of Science, May 16, 2018)  Simon Fraser University researchers have developed materials that absorb near infrared radiation and discovered the mechanism involved.  Read more…

A key enzyme’s dance in silico provides clues to its normal regulation and its dysfunction in human disorders (Faculty of Science, May 5, 2018)  The regulation of enzyme activity is diverse; that of CCT is exquisite. Research on this enzyme by the Cornell lab at Simon Fraser University is making strides toward solving the puzzle of how single amino acid changes in the structure lead to several human disorders in the development of bone, eyesight and lipid deposition defects.   Read more…

Protecting ‘reefs of hope’ may offset climate-change damage to coral reefs  (Diane Mar-Nicolle, Apr 20, 2018)  Among the most damaging effects that climate change has wrought on the natural world are those sustained by coral reefs. Grim, yes, yet Simon Fraser University alumnus Emily Darling and marine biology professor Isabelle Côté are hopeful that all is not lost for coral reefs.  Read more…

Saving Sharks with Trees  (Faculty of Science, Apr 12, 2018)  Find out how shark conservation efforts can be supported by building a detailed family tree to understand and protect the diversity among shark species at risk.  Read more…

Single crystals as pistons (Faculty of Science, Mar 29, 2018)  The Leznoff Group has created new platinum-based coordination polymers that when heated, expand only in a single direction.   Read more…

Advancing research tools through student creativity and innovation (Faculty of Science, Mar 19, 2018)  Find out how a chemistry graduate student from Simon Fraser University developed data for 3D printing of molecular structures and prompted broad access for all.  Read more…

Insurance risk: when does ruin occur and how severe would it be? (Faculty of Science, Mar 15, 2018)  See how Dr. Yi Lu’s interest in risk/ruin theory in actuarial science and applied probability can help the insurance industry.  Read more…

Sharpening the tool of single-cell proteomics (Faculty of Science, Mar 15, 2018) Simon Fraser University researchers have developed highly sensitive mass spectrometry parameters for the single-cell proteomic analysis.  Read more…

How far-reaching are the effects of the 2011 Fukushima power plant accident? (Diane Mar-Nicolle, Mar 8, 2018) In the years since the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power accident, chemist Krzysztof Starosta and his team in SFU’s Nuclear Science lab have been using high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy to search West Coast soil and salmon for telltale signs of radioactivity.  Read more…

New type of superconductivity in topological materials (Faculty of Science, Mar 7, 2018) Researchers at Simon Fraser University reveal an unconventional superconductivity in Luttinger semimetals.  Read more…

Could epilepsy be caused by defective cellular antenna? (Faculty of Science, Mar 6, 2018) Simon Fraser University’s Michel Leroux and collaborators are studying a protein linked to epilepsy.  Read more…

Exercise may decrease heart drug’s effectiveness (Diane Mar-Nicolle, Mar 5, 2018) Health care experts are quick to remind us that a healthy lifestyle includes regular exercise. But what if certain, potentially life-saving medications don’t perform as well during exercise?  Read more…

50 years of SFU chemistry celebrated by scientific journal (Diane Mar-Nicolle, Mar 1, 2018) A half century of scientific discovery and research at Simon Fraser University was honoured recently with a special issue of the Canadian Journal of Chemistry.  Read more…

New high-throughput robotic facility opens at SFU (Diane Mar-Nicolle, Feb 27, 2018) Walk by the Faculty of Science’s newest facility and you will likely witness a dozen robotic instruments working in synchronicity within a sterile glass chamber. This is what the face of modern day chemical biology looks like.  Read more…

Highly sensitive non-coding RNA imaging  (Faculty of Science, Feb 20, 2018) Simon Fraser University researchers have developed a set of highly fluorescent tags for imaging RNAs in mammalian cells.  Read more…

Repurposing the application of laboratory filter paper: Beyond filtration (Faculty of Science, Feb 19, 2018) Dr. Hogan Yu and his Simon Fraser University research team have developed a more environmentally friendly treatment to make regular filter paper waterproof and a material to be used in microfluidic analytical devices.   Read more…

Study shows bowel care is the most pressing quality of life issue for those with spinal cord injury (Diane Mar-Nicholle, Feb 15, 2018) Cardiovascular physiology researcher Victoria Claydon’s latest study, published in the Journal of Neurotrauma, focuses on the results of her multi-national study, which surveyed almost 300 participants with spinal cord injuries at or above the mid-thoracic level (middle of the chest ).  Read more…

No plastics left behind: study confirms plastic beach debris a danger to ocean life (Diane Mar-Nicholle, Feb 14, 2018) Last summer, Bertrand Munier spent four weeks picking up plastic debris from nine beaches along Burrard Inlet in Vancouver, B.C..  He photographed and collected every piece of plastic debris within a 1-km X 10-meter strip of mid-tide beach and ended up with 150 items.  Read more…

SFU innovation revolutionizes the microscope, allows R&D to accelerate discovery (SFU Communications, Feb 8, 2018) A new microscope developed by SFU researchers Mike Kirkness and Nancy Forde spins thousands of times faster than a fairground swing ride, and subjects its contents to forces hundreds of times higher than in a NASCAR race or rocket liftoff.  Read more…

Endangered frogs: Getting the most bang for your conservation buck  (SFU Communications, Jan 24, 2018) Captive breeding may be a cost-effective strategy to reduce the extinction of critically-endangered amphibians when few other options exist. That’s according to a new study published in Ecological Economics by SFU ecologists Amanda Kisseland, Wendy Palen, and B.C. Ministry of Environment conservation specialist Purnima Govindarajulu.  Read more…

SFU researchers’ new database to help eradicate asthma in children  (Justin Wang, Jan 23, 2018) Imagine a world where allergies, asthma and related chronic diseases are rare. Better yet, imagine a world where these conditions can be prevented. A powerful new database being created by SFU genomics and bioinformatics researcher Fiona Brinkman and her team will help Canadian researchers make that world a reality.  Read more…

Saving sharks: SFU study identifies conservation priorities based on evolutionary history  (SFU News, Jan 18, 2018) To shine light on and conserve rare shark, ray, and chimaera species (chondrichthyans), SFU researchers have developed a fully resolved family tree and ranked every species according to their unique evolutionary history.  Read more…

It's the small things that matter - when insects shaped today's natural world  (Diane Mar-Nicolle, Jan 16, 2018) Research Associate Bruce Archibald in the Biological Sciences lab of Rolf Mathewes at Simon Fraser University led an international research team in a study that sheds new light on how the world became modern.  Read more…

Are bears picky eaters?  (Faculty of Science, Jan 10, 2018) Researchers at Simon Fraser University take a close look at predator-prey interactions between bears and salmon on the British Columbia coast.  Read more…

New findings on dark energy question Einstein’s cosmological constant (Justin Wong & Gabriel Colome, Jan 5, 2018) An international study co-led by SFU physicist Levon Pogosian has revealed that dark energy, widely thought to be the cosmological constant, may not be constant after all.  Read more…

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