Design for better data from computer experiments  (Faculty of Science, Dec 6, 2017) SFU researcher Boxin Tang and his collaborator have devised a new method for constructing space-filling designs that is simple, and suitable for a wide range of computer modeling applications.  Read more…

Sociodiversity in honeybees and humans  (Faculty of Science, Dec 4, 2017) Simon Fraser University’s Dr. Bernie Crespi provides commentary on a recent research paper that provides evidence of overlap between humans and honeybees in genes underlying social behaviour.  Read more…

SFU-Brazilian researchers connect to tackle insect transmitted diseases (SFU News, Oct 26, 2017) Research collaborators from SFU and Federal University of Rio de Janeiro in Brazil are studying why certain insects transmit diseases. Their collaboration began nearly a decade ago after discovering they shared a research interest in insects that transmit harmful and deadly diseases, including Dengue virus, Zika virus, and Chagas disease.  Read more…

Conservation actually works (Wan Yee Lok, Oct 25, 2017) Do countries that invest more on conservation actually achieve better results? SFU biological sciences Arne Mooers is a member of an international research team that released a study today in Nature confirming that countries that spend more money on conservation had less of their biodiversity subsequently threatened with extinction.  Read more…

New genetic research sheds light on sudden unexplained death in the young (Diane Luckow, Oct 20, 2017) Informing a grieving family that their child has suddenly died of unexplainable causes is a painful task for all coroners. Yet that’s the sad reality in an estimated 700 pediatric deaths each year in Canada.  Read more…

Intellectual disability and epilepsy in children (Faculty of Science, Oct 5, 2017) Simon Fraser University’s Tom Claydon is part of a research team studying genetic mutations that cause intellectual disability and epilepsy in children. These mutations reveal a novel potential target for therapeutics.  Read more…

Robust synthetic methods and molecular modifications are paving the way to high-performance, greener fuel cells.  (Faculty of Science, Aug 27, 2017) Researchers at Simon Fraser University have discovered modifications that yield high-performance proton exchange membranes.  Read more…

Subduction zone earthquakes off BC’s South Coast: were they all giants?  (Faculty of Science, Aug 18, 2017) Researchers take a closer look at the giant earthquakes in the Cascadia subduction zone, which often involve rupture of the full 1100-km long fault rather than just sections of it, causing earthquakes of magnitude 9 or larger.  Read more…

New complex materials with enhanced ability to convert mechanical stress into electrical energy and vice versa  (Faculty of Science, Aug 11, 2017) Researchers have synthesized new piezoelectric materials with significantly enhanced properties. This new family of materials has excellent potential for applications in electromechanical sensors and actuators, high energy density capacitors, and other devices.  Read more…

Study finds greater risk of extinction among high diversity amphibian groups  (Diane Mar-Nicolle, May 30, 2017)  A new study by Simon Fraser University biologists Dan Greenberg and Arne Mooers offers clues to why more than 30 per cent of amphibians, including frogs, newts, toads and salamanders, are at risk of extinction. Read more…

Black swans and the detection of ecological collapse  (Faculty of Science, May 26, 2017) We are all familiar with 'black swan' events – unpredictable and typically devastating events like stock market crashes and extreme weather – but occurrences such as population crashes among animals can have profound effects on society as well.  Researchers at Simon Fraser University and the University of Washington are looking at what drives population crashes and how they might be forecasted. Read more…

Natural Products: Are we close to the end?  (Faculty of Science, May 1, 2017) The search for novel molecular structures in Nature and the need for new antibiotics have prompted Simon Fraser University researchers to tackle important questions that will focus our efforts toward maximizing medically relevant discoveries from natural products research. Key questions include: what novel natural product structures remain undiscovered? where will we find them? are we going about this in the right way? Read more…

Preventing falls: A balancing act between posture and blood pressure control   (Faculty of Science, May 1, 2017) A large number of falls among elderly individuals remain unpredictable. Researchers at Simon Fraser University have completed a 10-year study of posture and blood pressure control that shows that these factors are linked. Their findings have the potential to help improve rehabilitative treatment and prevention of fall related injuries.  Read more…

River piracy caused by climate change  (Faculty of Science, Apr 21, 2017) The Yukon has a long history of geological wonders, great discoveries, and mysterious events. However, the latest ‘rush’ was not for gold; rather, it was a rush of cold water that rapidly changed directions. A team of researchers including SFU’s John Clague reveals that the cause is no mystery, this radical shift was indeed caused by climate change. Read more…

Enabling clean energy solutions through materials science  (Faculty of Science, Apr 21, 2017) Simon Fraser University researchers have improved the efficiency of nickel based materials used in electrochemical reactions that are critical to the generation of some alternative sources of fuels.  Read more…

Could a sugar molecule be key to fine-tuning how the genome responds to changes in an animal’s environment?  (Faculty of Science, Apr 19, 2017) Researchers at SFU think so. Their research suggests that proteins modified by a specialized sugar help fine-tune the expression of a large number of genes.  Read more…

Winners and losers among fish when watersheds change (Faculty of Science, Apr 19, 2017) A highly publicized study by researchers from SFU and University of Washington finds that there are winners and losers among fish as humans build roads and buildings in watersheds. This diversity of land-use sensitivities and ecological functions can provide ecosystems with a buffer from increased human development.  Read more…

A low-cost way to amplify DNA for genetic tests  (Faculty of Science, Apr 12, 2017) Researchers at SFU have developed a new method of DNA amplification that uses gold nanoparticles to help denature DNA strands. Conducted at a single temperature, this new method is a game changer for low-cost genetic testing.  Read more…

SFU's new supercomputer "Cedar" and its significance for Canadian researchers (Tia O'Grady, Apr 11, 2017) Compute Canada is renewing Canada’s advanced research computing platform and SFU is the home site for one of the four new supercomputing systems. Boiinformatics expert Dr. Brinkman discusses why the SFU supercomputer "Cedar" is so important for her research and the research of others in Canada.  Read more…

A new chemical reaction enables synthesis of unique cancer imaging agents (Faculty of Science, Apr 4, 2017) SFU Researchers discovered a unique chemical reaction that enables the incorporation of a fluorine radioisotope into various drugs used for cancer imaging. Through this reaction, they created a new tumor imaging agent that accumulates in cancer cells.  Read more…

Bright spots of hope for sharks and rays (Faculty of Science, Apr 3, 2017) Contrary to the conventional wisdom, sharks and rays can be fished sustainably. SFU researchers are investigating how sustainable shark management works and how it provides hope for sharks and rays facing extinction.  Read more…

Super-Seniors may reveal the secrets to healthy aging  (Faculty of Science, Mar 29, 2017) Super-Seniors live to old age without any major age-related disease.  Such health and longevity is attributed to both lifestyle and genetic factors. SFU researchers are studying the genetic makeup of Super-Seniors to understand what makes them so fortunate.  Read more…

 A ‘basic’ approach to water splitting as a promising way to store solar energy for on-demand use (Faculty of Science, Mar 29, 2017) SFU researchers have synthesized an efficient copper catalyst for carrying out water oxidation that will allow them to use water splitting to capture and store solar energy Read more…

Do female guppies prefer colourful males with bigger Y chromosomes? (Faculty of Science, Mar 28, 2017) Published in Nature Communications, SFU researchers are part of a team that confirmed how and when guppy sex chromosomes evolved, and what females are looking for in a male.  The implications include understanding gender determination and diseases caused by mutations in sex chromosomes.  Read more…

A new mathematical approach to mapping surfaces (Faculty of Science, Mar 27, 2017) SFU researchers have discovered a computer algorithm for solving mathematical equations that describe how to map locations from one surface to another.  Read more…

Adjusting for scorekeeper bias in NBA box scores (Faculty of Science, Mar 22, 2017) Researchers at SFU have discovered a systematic bias among scorekeepers in the National Basketball Association.  Read more…

Despite its name, the "minor” pilin plays a major role in Vibrio cholerae pathogenesis.   (Faculty of Science, Mar 22, 2017) The bacterial pathogen Vibrio cholerae uses specialized filaments called Type IV pili to form bacterial aggregates that allow it to colonize its human host. While protected in these aggregates, V. cholerae secretes a toxin, which causes the severe and potentially fatal diarrhea symptomatic of the disease cholera.  Read more…

Could ammonia be developed as a hydrogen storage medium to support a hydrogen-based energy economy?   (Faculty of Science, Mar 15, 2017) SFU researchers are using switchable chemistry to release dinitrogen (N2) from a previously unreactive product of ammonia activation. With further research this work may provide an opportunity for the development of ammonia as a hydrogen storage medium. Read more…

How can theory and simulation drive fuel cell electrocatalysis? (Faculty of Science, Mar 14, 2017) Increasing energy demand, dwindling conventional resources of fossil fuels, and adverse impacts on climate and environment of the current energy use drive the transformation of the global energy infrastructure. Electrochemical technologies like batteries, fuel cells or electrolyzers, will play a crucial role to help fill the gap between future energy demand and supply. SFU researchers develop theoretical methodologies for computer-based electrocatalysis simulations that allow the key reactions at play to be examined from first principles of physics. Read more…

SFU at the forefront of solid state functional materials science (Faculty of Science, Mar 13, 2017) SFU researchers have contributed significantly to the development of high-performance piezoelectric materials of complex oxide perovskite single crystals. Now, they have revealed the secret behind those properties and are ready to design the next generation of superior piezoelectrics. Read more…

Rational design of inhibitors for sugar processing enzymes (Faculty of Science, Mar 12, 2017) Applying their knowledge of enzyme catalysis, SFU researchers designed and then synthesized a novel sugar-like molecule that inhibits a sugar-processing enzyme. They used this inhibitor to uncover key missing details of the enzyme-catalyzed reaction. Their successful strategy provides a basis for designing mechanism-based inhibitors of other enzymes. Read more…

Research breaks new ground on tracking brain changes in autism (SFU News, Mar 10, 2017) Simon Fraser University researchers Sam Doesburg and Vasily Vakorin have discovered that the way in which different regions of the brain communicate with each other develops atypically in autism.  Read more…

Water: the gatekeeper for oxygen transport through anion exchange membranes used in fuel cells (Faculty of Science, Mar 9, 2017) Researchers at SFU used analytical electrochemistry coupled with numerical modeling and materials chemistry to investigate the transport of oxygen in their novel alkali-based, ion transporting membrane in order to maximize the power of alkaline polymer fuel cells. Read more…

Is there mounting water stress on small islands? (Faculty of Science, Mar 8, 2017) To help answer this question, SFU researchers evaluated 43 small islands worldwide. Their findings, published in Nature Climate Change, demonstrate that nearly half of these islands are experiencing a significant reduction in freshwater availability. Read more...

How and why are humans like social insects? (Faculty of Science, Mar 7, 2017)  Understanding the origins, evolution and forms of human social cooperation represents one of the outstanding unresolved questions in the sciences and humanities. A Simon Fraser University researcher is tackling this question using a method pioneered by Darwin himself to investigate social convergences of humans and social insects. Read more…

New evidence that tropical ice caps existed in the Andes will help researchers understand near-future climate change says SFU study (Justin Wong - Mar 2, 2017) A study by SFU earth scientists Nicholas Roberts and John Clague as well as René Barendregt from the University of Lethbridge reveals the first geologic evidence of recurrent ice caps in the tropical Andes over 2.7 million years ago—including during Earth’s last long globally warm period. Read more...

New tools to advance particle physics, SAR technology (SFU News - Feb 28, 2017) A new particle physics detector lab—where SFU researchers involved in ATLAS, the world’s largest physics experiment, can carry out research—and a specialized sensor to improve airborne monitoring for security, wildfires and other disasters, are among new tools that will help grow world-class research at SFU. Read more...

Winners, losers among fish when landscape undergoes change (Michelle Ma, University of Washington - Feb 21, 2017) As humans build roads, construct buildings and develop land for agriculture, freshwater ecosystems respond - but not always in the ways one might expect. Read more...

Cracking Darwinism: natural perfumes mediate mate choice and speciation in stick insects says SFU study (Justin Wong, SFU News - Feb 21, 2017) A collaborative study involving SFU biological sciences researchers Bernard Crespi, Gerhard Gries, and Regine Gries reveals that natural selection can drive speciation through cryptic colouration and mate choice in stick insects. Read more...

Flirting on the fly: humans can learn a thing or two from blow flies about attraction on dating apps (Justin Wong, SFU News - Feb 14, 2017) If your current relationship status this Valentine’s Day is “made dinner for two and ate both,” you may want to start taking notes. Read more...

SFU researchers shine light on antimatter (Wan Yee Lok, SFU News - Jan 30, 2017) Simon Fraser University physics professor Mike Hayden and PhD student Justine Munich are part of the ALPHA Collaboration, an international team that has recently shone light on antimatter—literally. Read more...

Helping save the critically endangered Angelshark living in the waters of the Canary Islands (Justin Wong, SFU News - Dec 19, 2016) The majestic Angelshark is one of the world’s most threatened shark species and SFU marine biology professor Nicholas Dulvy has a plan to protect the shark. Read more...

SFU researchers work to fine-tune collagen growth (Diane Mar-Nicolle & Marianne Meadahl - Dec 7, 2016) SFU researchers have identified the crucial first stage of how collagen self-assembles into fibrils. Read more...

High-resolution brain scans could improve concussion detection (SFU News - Dec 7, 2016) Simon Fraser University researchers have found that high-resolution brain scans, coupled with computational analysis, could play a critical role in helping to detect concussions that conventional scans might miss. Read more...

Evergreen Line 'cores' provide earth scientists with wealth of historical data (SFU News - Dec 1, 2016) As the long-awaited Evergreen SkyTrain Line opens this week, two SFU earth scientists are uncovering a wealth of history about the region from drill cores associated with the line’s tunnel excavation. Read more...

Scientists work to map human epigenome (SFU News - Nov 17, 2016) B.C. scientists, including Steven Jones, a professor in SFU’s Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, are playing a major role in an international effort to map the entire human epigenome—an initiative that may prove bigger than the Human Genome Project. Read more...

Understanding how the "blood-brain barrier" is breached in bacterial meningitis (SFU News - Oct 4, 2016) Simon Fraser University researcher Lisa Craig is part of an international team that has uncovered new details about a microbe that invades the brain, sometimes with fatal results. Read more...

Why Jim Woodgett wrote an open letter blasting CIHR reforms – and what comes next (Becky Rynor, University Affairs - Sep 26, 2016) Researchers at universities across the country are struggling, says Dr. Woodgett... with the next round of research applications looming, the CIHR grant system "is still a mess." Read more...

The delicate power of soft materials (Office of the Vice-President, Research - Sep 16, 2016) When Burnaby-based Nanotech Security Corp. was chosen to produce a ticket that incorporated their anti-counterfeiting technology for the 2016 Euro Cup, they turned to SFU’s Centre for Soft Materials to help them execute the task. Read more...

SFU researchers develop new tools to combat infectious diseases (SFU News - Sep 16, 2016) New funding from Genome Canada will help SFU scientists specializing in health informatics develop ways to more effectively analyse, interpret and apply big data to improve key health-related issues, from infectious disease outbreaks to managing the world’s food crops. Read more...

U.S. military takes SFU power-generating project for a test walk (Mark Hume, The Globe and Mail - July 13, 2016) An idea germinated in a biomedical lab at Simon Fraser University is being tested by the U.S. military in a research project meant to turn foot soldiers into their own power-generating stations. Read more...

Sea star death triggers ecological domino effect (Wan Yee Lok, SFU News - June 22, 2016) A new study by SFU marine ecologists Jessica Schultz, Ryan Cloutier and Isabelle Côté reveals that the mass mortality of sea stars has resulted in a domino effect on Howe Sound marine ecology. Read more...

Economics drive the extinction of large marine animals (Diane Mar-Nicolle - June 10, 2016) Research conducted by Simon Fraser University (SFU) and Colby College in Maine, finds that large marine animals are at a greater risk of extinction as a result of their large body size and their value to luxury markets, including game hunters. Read more...  

SFU spin-off tackles Progressive Supranuclear Palsy and Alzheimer’s Disease (SFU News - April 25, 2016) Almost 10 years ago, long-time friends David Vocadlo and Ernest McEachern met over coffee at Simon Fraser University’s Burnaby campus to discuss some intriguing basic research on sugar-processing enzymes. An unlikely hypothesis was beginning to emerge, that coating proteins with a bit of sugar would actually make them less sticky and block them from forming toxic clumps. Read more...

BC-led salmon genome collaboration published in Nature
(SFU News - April 18, 2016)
 SFU professor Willie Davidson is part of an international research team shedding new light on genome evolution. The researchers have established a “human” quality sequence of the Atlantic salmon genome that is now available online. Their work has been published in the prestigious journal Nature. Read more...

New way to smell a rat means end for rodents
(SFU News - April 11, 2016) The world’s burgeoning brown rat population may soon wane now that SFU scientists have identified and synthetically replicated the male brown rat’s sex pheromone. They find it is a powerful attractant for luring female brown rats into traps. Read more...

Digging for antibiotics just got easier
(Diane Mar-Nicolle - March 16, 2016) Finding molecules with antibiotic or anti-cancer properties is a labour intensive task for scientists. Yet, with a new state-of-the-art lab and equipment at hand, Roger Linington, a Department of Chemistry professor, hopes his work leads to a breakthrough in drug discovery. Read more...

SFU kinesiologist helps astronauts land safely on their feet
(Ian Bryce - March 9, 2016) 
Simon Fraser University kinesiology professor Andrew Blaber wants astronauts to see fewer stars—when they arrive back on Earth, that is. Read more...

Bed bug control closer with Scotts Canada sponsorship
(Diane Luckow - February 24, 2016) 
SFU communication ecologist Gerhard Gries says his new technology for detecting and controlling bed bugs is closer to commercialization now that Scotts Canada has become the industrial sponsor of his research chair. Read more...

Digging for antibiotics
(Diane Mar-Nicolle - February 12, 2016)
Roger Linington knows firsthand how important antibiotics are to health. They have helped him successfully recover from at least one critical infection. As the Canada Research Chair in Chemical Biology (High-Throughput Screening) Linington is on the hunt for a new class of antibiotics and he has some of the most powerful equipment in the world to help him. Read more...

Scratch these off of your Christmas shopping list
(Diane Mar-Nicolle - December 10, 2015) Last minute Christmas shoppers are a boon to the lottery business—who can resist buying a $1 stocking stuffer that could result in millions for the recipient? Tom Loughin can. Loughin, chair of the SFU Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science says, “While the draws are as random as they can be, the whole game is rigged against the player. The odds and payoffs are such that, on average, a person who plays consistently is merely piling up bigger and bigger losses.” Read more...

Genes responsible for the three kinds of male ruffs identified
(Diane Mar-Nicolle - November 16, 2015)
SFU biologist Dov Lank and a team of researchers have identified the genes responsible for three different kinds of male ruff (Philomachus pugnax)—a species of wading bird. The ruff is the only bird species in which three kinds of males exist, each having its own approach to courtship and mating and with distinct physical characteristics. One is a fighter, the second is a “wingman” and the third is a cross-dresser. Read more...

Scientists take aim at disease-carrying “kissing bug”
(Marianne Meadahl, SFU News - November 16, 2015)
 An international research team, including scientists from Simon Fraser University, hopes its study of the vector Rhodnius prolixus—also known as the “kissing bug” and a major contributor to Chagas disease—will further the development of innovative insect control methods to curb its impact on humans. Read more...

New research opens door to understanding tonsil cancer


(SFU News - October 30, 2015)
 Researchers at Simon Fraser University and the BC Cancer Agency have developed a groundbreaking method to identify and separate stem cells that reside in the tonsils. Their research, which sheds new light on the fight against oral cancer, is published today in the journal Stem Cell Reports. Read more...

SFU co-leads national project to revive Coho salmon
(Diane Mar-Nicolle - October 29, 2015)
 Simon Fraser University scientist Willie Davidson will co-lead a four-year project that holds the promise of reviving British Columbia’s commercial Coho salmon fishery. The project will develop the genomics resources and tools required for better stock identification, improved fisheries management, a more effective hatchery system, and growth of the land-based Coho salmon aquaculture industry. Read more...

New professorship focuses on new treatments for autism
(Marianne Meadahl, SFU News - October 22, 2015)
Sam Doesburg, a neuroscientist and an expert in magnetoencephalographic (MEG) brain imaging, is the inaugural holder of the Callum Frost Professorship in Translational Research in Autism at Simon Fraser University. Read more...

Mammoths in Haida Gwaii?
(Diane Mar-Nicolle - October 19, 2015) Rolf Mathewes is senior author of a new research paper that focuses on the past environment during the second-to-last glacial event on Haida Gwaii, about 57,000 years ago. Read more...

SFU Mathematicians solve maple tree sap mystery
(Diane Mar-Nicolle - September 25, 2015)
Applied mathematics professor John Stockie is the lead author of a study released in the journal Royal Society Interface. The team includes fellow SFU post-doctoral mathematicians Maurizio Ceseri and Isabell Graf. The trio set out to develop a mathematical model that captures the phenomenon of sap exudation; Read more...  

Wired for laziness
(Diane Mar-Nicolle - September 10, 2015) Do you feel lazy? Most of us do when we choose to drive somewhere when we could have walked, or skip daily exercise to binge watch “Game of Thrones.” New research from Simon Fraser University professor Max Donelan and his team demonstrates that this inherent laziness extends to our subconscious nervous system. Read more...

New cancer-fighting funds to help patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma
(Carol Thorbes, SFU News - August 27, 2015)
Half a million dollars in new funding is helping Simon Fraser University researcher Ryan Morin advance his efforts to help patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma live longer with less pain, and potentially even be cured. Read more...

Petronas LNG terminal set in salmon's 'Grand Central Station'
(CBC News - August 7, 2015) A new study appears to support arguments by B.C. First Nations that the Petronas LNG project on the Skeena River could hurt salmon stocks. Simon Fraser University Professor Jonathan Moore's study looked at the genetics of juvenile salmon from Flora Bank, the area where the new LNG terminal is planned along the Skeena River. Read more...

SFU study finds fat accumulation in human skeletal muscles concerning
(Carol Thorbes, SFU News - July 28, 2015) 
Our efforts to battle the bulge and stay youthful aren’t futile but they are certainly compromised by a physiological process that undermines our mobility, according to a Simon Fraser University scientist. Read more...

The first "deep" image taken from SFU's new Trottier Observatory: the Pinwheel Galaxy
(Howard Trottier - July 24, 2015) An image of the Pinwheel Galaxy, also known as Messier 101, was shot over the course of three nights at the end of May 2015. This first "deep" image taken at the new Trottier Observatory was captured and processed by Professor Howard Trottier of the Department of Physics. Read more...

Earth to Oceans (E2O) Research Group creates a splash
Founding members (l to r): John Reynolds, Isabelle Côté, Jonathan Moore, Nick Dulvy; not shown, Wendy Palen

(Diane Mar-Nicolle - July 17, 2015) In the five years that the Earth to Oceans (E2O) collaboration has existed, it has arguably become one of the most dynamic and fruitful research groups within SFU’s Faculty of Science.  The passion of faculty members chosen for their outstanding reputation in research and teaching drives the E2O group in tackling pressing issues in conservation and ecology of aquatic ecosystems. Read more...

Temperature change can trigger Sudden Cardiac Death
(Diane Mar-Nicolle - July 7, 2015) Sudden death caused by cardiac arrhythmia can be triggered by changes in body temperature. This is the finding of SFU professor Peter Ruben and his collaborators, Mena Abdelsayed and Colin Peters, published today in the Journal of Physiology. The soccer player who drops dead in the middle of a game, or the infant who dies during sleep is often a victim of arrhythmia. Read more...

SFU natural hazards researcher among Canada’s top "explorers”
(SFU News - May 25, 2015
) Astronaut Chris Hadfield, environmentalist David Suzuki and John Clague, Simon Fraser University earth sciences professor: what do they have in common? Read more...

Dating techniques: Illuminating the past
(April 23, 2015) David Huntley (Emeritus Professor of Physics) and his SFU colleagues introduced a new method of optical dating in 1985. This groundbreaking discovery is highlighted in a recent Nature News & Views nod to the International Year of Light and Light-based Technologies as a technique that "revolutionized studies of events that occurred during the past 500,000 years."

Sugar key to cellular proteins’ protection and viability
(SFU News - March 16, 2015) A Simon Fraser University laboratory’s breakthrough in understanding how a specialized sugar regulates protein levels in our cells could generate new targets for therapies to treat diseases caused by improper protein regulation. Cancer and various neurodegenerative diseases are among these diseases. In the case of Alzheimer’s disease, the toxic forms of two proteins accumulate in our brains. Read more...

Canadian scientists have developed a technology to address isotope shortages
(NSERC News Release - February 19, 2015
) Canada’s hospitals are on the verge of having a local supply of isotopes for medical imaging thanks to a new development by an innovative team of researchers focused on preventing future isotope shortages. Read more...

SFU plays key role in new national hub for glycomics research
(SFU News - February 17, 2015) 
Simon Fraser University is playing a key role in the new Canadian Glycomics Network (GlycoNet) announced this month by Minister of Health Rona Ambrose with a commitment of $27.3 million in federal funding over five years. Glycomics, the study of the structure and function of carbohydrates (sugars) in biological systems, promises to deliver far-reaching solutions to human health problems such as influenza, genetic diseases and diabetes. Read more...

Canada would benefit if high seas fishing closed
(Vancouver Sun - February 12, 2015) Canada is one of the countries that stands to benefit if the high seas were closed to fishing. “We have large EEZ (exclusive economic zones) around both coasts,” SFU biologist Isabelle Côté said. “Given various assumptions, we would stand to gain in the ballpark of $100 million to $125 million.” In fact, most countries would benefit, while only a few would suffer, if the high seas were closed to fishing, according to a study co-authored by Côté. Read more...

Heart cells throb in SFU lab
(Diane Luckow, SFU News - February 12, 2015)
In the molecular cardiac physiology lab at Simon Fraser University are dozens of Petrie dishes filled with human heart cells, or cardiomyocytes, all beating in unison. Graduate students Elham Afshinmanesh and Sanam Shaffaattalab have created the cardiomyocytes from the skin of patients suffering from inherited heart arrhythmias—genetic mutations that cause irregular heartbeats that can be lethal. Read more...

SFU scientists help put bedbugs to bed forever
(SFU Media Release - December 22, 2014)
One hundred eighty thousand bedbug bites later, SFU scientists have discovered chemical attractants for creating the world’s first effective and affordable bedbug bait and trap. Read more...

Genetic study sheds light on how mosquitoes transmit malaria
(Diane Mar-Nicolle - December 19, 2014)
  An international research team, including researchers from Simon Fraser University, has determined the genetic sequencing of 16 mosquitoes (Anopheles genus)—the sole carriers of human malaria—providing new insight into how they adapt to humans as primary hosts of the disease. Read more...

David Vocadlo named to College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists
(Diane Luckow, SFU News - September 17, 2014
) SFU professor David Vocadlo, Tier I Canada Research Chair in Chemical Glycobiology, is one of 91 inaugural members named to the Royal Society of Canada’s College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists. Read more...

Estrogen exposure: Timing is everything
(Faculty of Science - July 20, 2014
) Many pollutants found in the aquatic environment mimic or block the effects of estrogen in animals. Researchers are investigating the role of estrogen during development in salmonids to understand how environmental pollution affects fish growth and development.  Read more...

SFU trio among world’s most influential scientific minds
Professors Fiona Brinkman, Steven Jones & Marco Marra
(SFU News - July 17, 2014
) Three SFU scientists are among 90 Canadians on the Thomson Reuters list of “The World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds: 2014,” spanning 21 fields in the physical and social sciences.  Read more...

SFU V-P Research B. Mario Pinto named NSERC president
(SFU News - June 17, 2014
) B. Mario Pinto, SFU's vice-president, research will become the next president of the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC). Pinto, former chair of the chemistry department and well known as a pioneer in the field of chemical biology, has served as vp research for the past decade. He takes on the new role as head of NSERC effective this fall. Read more...