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Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 West Hastings Street

talks

Shaping Vancouver 2019: What's the Use of Heritage?

7 p.m. | May 21, 2019
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Admission

FREE, registration is required. Donations to Heritage Vancouver are much appreciated.

Details

When: Tue, May 21, 2019. 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Where: Djavad Mowafaghian World Art Centre (GCA 2555), Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 W. Hastings St.

**Please note that at this time, the building is only accessible via the Cordova Street courtyard entrance. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact us at 778-782-9223 or via email at cecmns@sfu.ca.

Additional Info: Co-presented by SFU's Vancity Office of Community Engagement and Heritage Vancouver

Conversation #1: Reshaping Local Places

Under many different names, including “revitalization”and “regeneration”, heritage is and can be used to craft a positive place image, develop local economic sectors, create a neighbourhood centre for culture, and improve upon the animation of local areas. This change can be compelling, but also has its challenges.

This process is especially relevant and timely in the False Creek Flats, Chinatown, and Punjabi Market areas of Vancouver. Under the False Creek Flats Plan approved in 2017, the approach is to make the area a thriving and innovative economic zone which “builds off of existing character… by leveraging key character assets, histories and economic anchors”. Chinatown is looking towards a process (including application for World Heritage) where a heritage informed by experiential authenticity, culture and ordinary daily life forms the basis for social and economic revitalization. Punjabi Market, while not having undergone extensive planning exercises, desires a future where the three block district is a place filled with Punjabi experiences for people to enjoy.

In this first talk, we look at how heritage can be used to reshape these places in the city. In particular, we examine:

  • What roles do these areas play in the broader narrative of the city, and how do we plan for them?
  • What is the difference between taking a “landscape” view of heritage vs a “site” view of heritage?
  • How can heritage be used as a lens through which to view issues around the integration of large developments, such as St. Paul’s Hospital, with neighbouring landscapes and the established ways of existing that are unique to people, organizations and businesses in these areas.
  • What conflicts emerge between the various meanings and values given to places?
  • How can culture-led plans fulfill economic, social and cultural objectives set for areas such as Chinatown and Punjabi Market?

Moderator

Bill Yuen – Executive Director of Heritage Vancouver Society

Bill is particularly interested in cultural landscape theory and practice as well as the role that normative economics, and behaviour play in heritage, heritage policy, and social outcomes. Recent work includes being part of the team researching San Francisco’s Legacy Business program and creating a Vancouver definition that is based off of a multitude of stakeholder values. In recent years, he has presented on creative interventions in heritage policy and managing change in cultural landscapes. Bill is involved in all aspects of the society from planning, program development and delivery, to administration and research.

Panelists

Ajay Puri – Community organizer

Ajay is a movement builder, strategist, and public speaker/facilitator. He has 20 years of experience in empowering communities and creating social change in the non-profit, academic, government and social innovation sectors. Mr. Puri has spoken to over 200 audiences nationally and internationally on topics dealing with social movements, social innovation, leadership, digital engagement, and healthcare transformation. He has co-founded many movements including: LeadNow, #EastVanLove, BeeVancity, RangiChangi Roots, and Changemakers Vancouver. He currently sits on the Leadership Council of the David Suzuki Foundation and the Advisory Boards of 312 Main, Inner Activist, Urban Workers Project, Kwi Awt Stelmexw, Vancouver Indigenous Fashion Week, and Social Change Institute at the Hollyhock Leadership Institute. He teaches social movement thinking at SFU RADIUS Ventures, Groundswell Social Ventures, Pearson and Bodwell Colleges.

Alisha Masongsong – Project Manager, Exchange Inner City

Alisha Masongsong has worked extensively with Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside population for the past 9 years, previously working as a frontline social service worker in the mental health and housing sectors. Through Alisha’s frontline work, she has gained a deeper understanding of the complexities of Vancouver’s DTES, as well as the systems and policies that benefit and or negatively affect people in poverty. Since then she has taken on the role as Project Manager of Exchange Inner City. Exchange Inner City is a community backbone organization for community economic development work in Vancouver's Inner City. Alisha has dedicated her career to work collaboratively with the community to collectively foster a vibrant and inclusive local economy where all residents can live full and rewarding lives.

Belle Cheung – Social and Cultural Planner, City of Vancouver Chinatown Transformation Team

Belle Cheung 張芷彤 is a 1.5-generation settler from Hong Kong and a guest on the unceded territories and traditional homelands of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh peoples. Belle’s work sits at the intersection of arts and culture, and advocates for race, cultural histories, and representation as important factors in arts and culture policies to more accurately represent Canada’s population, and to make diversity part of the “mainstream.” She is currently a Cultural Planner with the City of Vancouver’s Chinatown Transformation Team, part of a specialized team working on a long-term plan for Vancouver's historic Chinatown, including a possible application for UNESCO World Heritage Status designation for the neighbourhood.

Elia Kirby 
– President of the Arts Factory Society at 281 Industrial Avenue

Elia Kirby is a professional Technical Director and Production Manager for Theatre, Public Art, and Live Events. In 2003, Elia founded and continues to manage the Great Northern Way Scene Shop, where he has been involved in over 300 art projects, theatre and film sets, and performance events. Elia has taught Production Management and Technical Direction at Capilano University, UBC and SFU; and Human Geography at UBC. Elia is currently the President of the Arts Factory Society at 281 Industrial Avenue; a professional artist studio facility. His significant recent projects include: scenery for Times of India Film Awards (May 2013, BC Place), CODE Live (VanOc 2010), Calm, Plaza, and Horizon Sky for Vancouver Art Gallery Off Site, West Side Story set construction for Vancouver Opera, and the international tours of Dress Me Up In Your Love, (Theatre Replacement) and Winners and Losers (Theatre Replacement and Neworld Theatre).


About the series

Shaping Vancouver 2019: What's the Use of Heritage?

Vancouver’s heritage can play an important role towards creating a healthy, liveable city that protects our cultural and social resources. In a city facing immense development pressure, heritage is a valuable tool in the planning process. It is an active part of shaping the city, rather than the common assumption that it is an instrument for preventing change.

Beyond its preservationist roots, heritage is actually a method of place management with the intention of guiding change. Shaping Vancouver 2019: “What’s the Use of Heritage?” discusses how heritage fits in to planning Vancouver’s near future, what some of its uses are, and how it contributes to the city in more ways than aesthetics and historic commemoration.

Major change will be taking place across Vancouver: last November, Vancouver City Council approved a city-wide plan to outline how future development will unfold across the city. Additionally, large scale planning programs such as the Broadway Corridor, Chinatown Cultural Heritage Assets Management Plan, and Making Room are underway. What is heritage’s role in all of this? Where does heritage fit in and what are its uses?

Throughout this year’s series, we will explore how heritage can be used to make Vancouver a better place overall through the lens of various planning processes happening in the City. Heritage is a continuous thread that runs through the wider city, and we will end this year's series by tying heritage to the city-wide plan.

Questions? Contact info@heritagevancouver.org.


Find out more about the work of our partners & join the online discussion in SFU's Vancity Office of Community Engagement Facebook group!


Admission

FREE, registration is required. Donations to Heritage Vancouver are much appreciated.

Details

When: Tue, May 21, 2019. 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Where: Djavad Mowafaghian World Art Centre (GCA 2555), Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, 149 W. Hastings St.

**Please note that at this time, the building is only accessible via the Cordova Street courtyard entrance. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact us at 778-782-9223 or via email at cecmns@sfu.ca.

Additional Info: Co-presented by SFU's Vancity Office of Community Engagement and Heritage Vancouver

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