GRK 110-3: Modern Greek for Beginners I

Eirini Kotsovili
Online

An introduction to the Greek language that helps beginners to help develop survival skills in the most frequently encountered communicative situations. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Students with credit for LANG 110 when offered with the same title may not take this course for further credit.

GRK 160-3: Modern Greek for Beginners II

Eirini Kotsovili
Online

The aim of the course is to give those who have acquired the basic language skills a better understanding of the basic grammar of the Greek, and to develop their speaking and comprehension skills so that they are able to carry out small conversations. Reading comprehension, and the ability to write small paragraphs will also be emphasized. Prerequisite: GRK 110 or permission of the instructor. Students with credit for LANG 160 when offered with the same title may not take this course for further credit.

GRK 210-3: Modern Greek Intermediate I

Eirini Kotsovili
Online

The aim of the course is to continue developing students' Greek language skills so that they communicate in situations that extend beyond the basic level. The mediopassive voice for verbs, irregular classes of nouns, and the structure of subordinate sentences are some of the grammatical topics covered. Students will also receive extensive training in speaking, reading and writing at the level of a simple newspaper article. Prerequisite: GRK 160 or permission of the instructor. Students with credit for LANG 210 when offered with the same title may not take this course for further credit.

GRK 260-3: Modern Greek Intermediate II

Eirini Kotsovili
Online

Continues the work developed in GRK 210 including further training in speaking, reading and writing at an intermediate level. Prerequisite: GRK 210 or permission from the instructor. Students with credit for LANG 260 when offered with the same title may not take this course for further credit.

HS 100-4: The Greek World (B-HUM)

Dimitris Krallis, Eirini Kotsovili, James Horncastle
Lecture: Tu and Th 1230-1420

An interdisciplinary introduction to the Greek culture in different periods. Using various sources and materials the course explores continuities and ruptures, evolutions and revolutions, and the impact such issues have on the imagination of people today. Breadth-Humanities.

HS 231-3: Daily Life in Greece and Rome

Sabrina Higgins
Lecture: We 1430-1720

Examines the social history of ancient Greece and Rome, particularly through the study of relevant artifacts, art, architecture, and ancient texts (in translation). Considers topics such as the lives of men, women, children and slaves; the home; dining; government; the economy; the army; death and burial; and entertainment.

HS / HIST 275-4: From Alexander to the Caesars: The Hellenic and Roman Worlds to the end of Antiquity (B-HUM)

Dimitris Krallis
Lecture: Tu 0830-1020
Tutorials: Th 0830-0920 / 0930-1020

This is an overview of Near Eastern and Mediterranean history from Alexander the Great and the Roman Empire to early Byzantium and the side of Islam that covers the Hellenistic, Roman, and early Byzantine Worlds with emphasis on the place of Hellenism in social, political, religious, and cultural life at the time. Students with credit for HIST 308, HS 308, or HIST 275 may not take this course for further credit.

HS / HIST 277-3: History of Greek Civilization (B-HUM)

André Gerolymatos
Online

Surveys the history of Greek civilization from Mycenaean Greece to the twentieth century. Students who have taken HIST 307 under this topic or HIST 277 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities.

HS / IS 280-3: War in the Balkans and the Making of the 21st Century

James Horncastle
Lecture: Mo 1030-1220
Tutorials: We 0930-1020 / 1130-1220

This course provides an overview of military developments in the 20th century Balkan history as a backdrop to the dramatic changes in Greece and South Eastern Europe in the 21st century. Students with credit for HS 280 may not take IS 280 for further credit.

HS 303 / GSWS 318-4: Political Representations of Women in Film and Literature

Eirini Kotsovili
Lecture: We 0930-1320

This course reflects on past and present representations of women in a wide range of writings and films produced in N. America, Europe, the Balkans and Latin America. The objective of the course is to analyze the selected visual and textual narratives so as to reflect on the specific social contexts and the prevailing cultural and gender norms.

HS 303 / HUM 385-4: Cinema and Politics in the Mediterranean

Eirini Kotsovili
Lecture: Mo 1330-1720

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach so as to reflect on 20th and 21st c. films from various countries of the Mediterranean. It addresses themes such as: ideology, identity, gender, narrative of crises, nostalgia, alienation, inter/national conflict, loss, migration, history, memory, love and violence. 

HS / ARCH 312-4: Greek Art and Archaeology

Sabrina Higgins
Lecture: Tu and Th 1030-1220

Introduces the major Greek archaeological sites from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period through a chronological and historical survey of Greek art and architecture. Examines the ways in which ancient Greeks used and interacted with their material remains and how they relate to their social, cultural, religious, and political practices and institutions. Prerequisite: 45 units, including 9 hours of lower division Hellenic Studies or Archaeology units or by permission of instructor. Students with credit for ARCH 312 cannot take this course for further credit. Students with credit for ARCH 321 under the title "Select Regions in World Archaeology I: Greece" may not take this course for further credit.

HS / HIST 364-4: Traveller, Diplomatic, and Media Narratives in Greece, the Balkans, and the Mediterranean

Evdoxios Doxiadis
Lecture: Tu 1330-1720

Considers the accounts of foreign travellers and correspondents of the region in question from the early Grand Tour to the present and contrasts these accounts with historical facts and developments. Examines how perceptions regarding the Balkans (or the Mediterranean) were formed as well as their persistence in modern times. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students with credit for HIST 364 may not take HS 364 for further credit.

HS / HIST 441 / GSWS 411-4: Women, Property, and the Law in the Mediterranean

Evdoxios Doxiadis
Lecture: Th 0830-1220

Examines the relationship between women and law through a focus on the question of property from the ancient world to the modem period and through a comprehensive examination of the Roman, Judaic, Christian, Islamic as well as modern legal traditions. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students with credit for HIST 441 may not take HS 441 for further credit.

UPCOMING COURSES

Spring 2018 (1181)

GRK 110-3: MODERN GREEK FOR BEGINNERS I (ONLINE)

GRK 160-3: MODERN GREEK FOR BEGINNERS II (ONLINE)

GRK 210-3: MODERN GREEK INTERMEDIATE I (ONLINE)

GRK 260-3: MODERN GREEK INTERMEDIATE II (ONLINE)

HS 150-3: WARFARE IN THE HELLENIC WORLD: FROM PLATO TO NATO

HS 232-3: RELIGIONS OF ANCIENT GREECE AND ROME

HS 303 / HUM 309-4: CIVIL WARS IN CONTEXT

HS / HIST 304-4: ALEXANDER THE GREAT AND THE QUEST FOR WORLD EMPIRE (ONLINE)

HS / HIST 307-4: FROM THE TROJAN WAR TO THE GAME OF THRONES: WARFARE IN ANTIQUITY AND POPULAR REPRESENTATION

HS / ARCH 313-3: ROMAN ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY 

HS / WL 403-4: GREEKS GO GLOBAL

HS / HIST 422-4: GREECE, 1935-1944: OCCUPATION AND RESISTANCE

HS 477-4: WAR IN THE SHADOWS: ESPIONAGE, INSURGENCY, AND VIOLENCE IN THE EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN (B-HUM)

HIST 894-5: WAR AND SOCIETY

Courses listed here are tentative only and subject to change. Check back often.

COURSE ARCHIVE

HS COURSE DESIGNATION

Hellenic Studies now has its own course designation!

As an independent Program, Hellenic Studies offers designated courses in cooperation with other departments, such as History, Humanities, and International Studies.

What this means to students:

Students will have the choice of registering in a ‘cross-listed’ course either under Hellenic Studies (HS), or, for example this semester, History (HIST).

These courses will be listed each semester in the Schedule of Undergraduate Classes as well as in the SFU Calendar.

For example:

HIST    277-3 History of Greek Civilization

Requirement Designation:  B-Hum

6295    C100    SEC    (Dist Ed.) A.Gerolymatos

HS       277-3 History of Greek Civilization

Requirement Designation:  B-Hum

10169  C100    SEC    (Dist Ed.) A.Gerolymatos

Once again, these courses are the same course.  

Regardless of which course number you register in, HS or HIST, the course will still count toward your Major or Minor in History and also toward a Certificate in Hellenic Studies. 

If for any reason you find you are not able to enroll in any of these HS/HIST courses, or, if you have any questions or concerns, please contact Maria Hamilton, Hellenic Studies Academic Advisor, at 778-782-5886 or mhamilton@sfu.ca.