Health Sciences | Faculty of Health Sciences Simon Fraser University Calendar | Fall 2013

Health Sciences Major

Bachelor of Arts

Admission Requirements

Internal Transfer

Internal transfer allows students to transfer, within Simon Fraser University, from one faculty to another. Students can apply for internal transfer into the Faculty of Health Sciences with a minimum CGPA of 2.5 and after completion of one of the following 200-level HSCI courses with a minimum grade of C-: HSCI 211-3, HSCI 212-3, HSCI 214-3, HSCI 215-3, or HSCI 216-3.

Minimum Grades

Students enrolling in HSCI courses must have a grade of C- or better in prerequisite courses and in the program's required courses.

Program Requirements

This bachelor of arts degree program requires 120 units, including at least 45 in the upper division.

Lower Division Requirements

Students complete a total of 28-29 units, including

HSCI 130 - Foundations of Health Science (4)

How health, illness and disease are defined and measured for individuals and populations. Research strategies used to identify how health, illness and disease are distributed across human populations and how environmental, socio-economic, demographic, biological, behavioural and political factors influence individual and population health. Breadth-Social Sci/Science.

and one of

BISC 101 - General Biology (4)

An introduction to the biochemical and physiological mechanisms of living organisms. Topics covered include cell structure and function, DNA replication and the flow of genetic information, enzyme function, metabolism and physiology of microorganisms, plants, and animals. Prerequisite: High school biology 12 (or equivalent) with a C grade or better, or BISC 100 with C- or better, or HSCI 100 with C+ or better. Breadth-Science.

HSCI 100 - Human Biology (3)

An examination of the biological processes that underlie human health and well-being, with emphasis on the evolutionary and ecological influences affecting human populations. Students with credit for BISC 101 and 102 may not take HSCI 100 for further credit. Prerequisite: Students with credit for BISC 101 may not take HSCI 100 for further credit. Breadth-Science.

and one of

SA 101 - Introduction to Anthropology (A) (4)

An introduction to the study of human social and cultural life from an anthropological perspective. The course will explore the scope and nature of the discipline of anthropology through study of selected cases drawn from both technologically simple communities and complex modern industrial societies. Students with credit for SA 170 may not take SA 101 for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences. Equivalent Courses: SA170. Breadth-Social Sciences.

SA 150 - Introduction to Sociology (S) (4)

The study of basic concerns of sociology, such as social order, social change, social conflict and social inequality. Breadth-Social Sciences. Equivalent Courses: PSA.101. Breadth-Social Sciences.

and at least one additional HSCI 100 division course

and one of

STAT 201 - Statistics for the Life Sciences (3)

Research methodology and associated statistical analysis techniques for students with training in the life sciences. Intended to be particularly accessible to students who are not specializing in Statistics. Students with credit for STAT 101, 102, 203 (formerly 103), 270 (formerly MATH 272) or 301 may not take STAT 201 for further credit. Prerequisite: 30 units. Quantitative.

STAT 203 - Introduction to Statistics for the Social Sciences (3)

Descriptive and inferential statistics aimed at students in the social sciences. Scales of measurement. Descriptive statistics. Measures of association. Hypothesis tests and confidence intervals. Students in Sociology and Anthropology are expected to take SA 255 before this course. Intended to be particularly accessible to students who are not specializing in Statistics. Students with credit for STAT 101, 102, 103, 201, 270, ARCH 376 or, BUEC 232 (formerly 332), may not subsequently receive credit for this course. Recommended: a research methods course such as SA 255, CRIM 120, POL 213 or equivalent is recommended prior to taking STAT 203. Quantitative. Equivalent Courses: STAT102 STAT103 STAT201 STAT270 STAT301. Prerequisite: REQ-Students in Sociology and Anthropology are expected to take SA255 before this crs. Students with credit for STAT101, 102, 103, 201, 270, ARCH376 or, BUEC232 (formerly 332), may not receive further credit. Recommended: SA255, CRIM120, POL213 or equiv. Quantitative.

and at least four of

HSCI 211 - Perspectives on Cancer, Cardiovascular, and Metabolic Diseases (3)

An interdisciplinary overview of the major non-communicable diseases - cancers, cardiovascular and metabolic diseases - from a public health perspective. Review of biological mechanisms, risk factors, historical and cultural contexts, and global distribution. Prerequisite: HSCI 100 or BISC 101, HSCI 130.

HSCI 212 - Perspectives on Infectious and Immunological Diseases (3)

An integrated survey of infectious diseases and their social and economic causes and consequences. Infectious agents, including bacteria, protozoa, fungi and viruses -- how they spread, how they work, and how they can be stopped. Surveillance, prevention, and management of infectious diseases and epidemics. Prerequisite: HSCI 100 or BISC 101, HSCI 130.

HSCI 214 - Perspectives on Mental Health and Illness (3)

An interdisciplinary overview of mental health and mental illness among populations. A review of the distribution and risk factors of mental illnesses as well as the historical and cultural context of their development. Prerequisite: HSCI 100 or BISC 101, HSCI 130.

HSCI 215 - Perspectives on Disability and Injury (3)

An interdisciplinary overview of injury and disability. Review of global distribution and risk factors. Examination of disability and injury across multiple levels of analysis. Prerequisite: HSCI 100 or BISC 101, HSCI 130.

HSCI 216 - Ecological Determinants of Human Growth, Development and Health (3)

Effects that social and ecological factors have on human growth, development and health. Challenges such as epidemics, natural catastrophes, industrialization, globalization, migration, poverty, war, global warming, etc, leading to evolution and adaptations. Relationships between socio-ecological challenges, their health consequences and related gene-population variations and effects on growth, development, sexual maturation, reproductive investment, and senescence and health. Prerequisite: HSCI 100 or BISC 101.

Upper Division Requirements

Students complete a total of at least 45 units, including all of

HSCI 304 - Perspectives on Environmental Health (3)

Environmental risks and the impact of human activity on health. Chemical and biological hazards. Methodological approaches to their detection, assessment, management, and mitigation. Prerequisite: Two HSCI 200-level courses one of which may be taken concurrently.

HSCI 305 - The Canadian Health System (3)

A comparative analysis of the Canadian health care financing and delivery systems and policies. History, organizational principles, health care resources, costs, access to care, quality, and equity. Societal and political issues, threats and values that affect Canada's health care system and others around the world. Prerequisite: 60 units, including nine HSCI units.

HSCI 307 - Research Methods in Health Sciences (3)

Principles and applications in health sciences research methodology. Quantitative and qualitative methods. Research process and design. Appropriate approaches for diverse research questions. Research ethics, sources of data, sampling, measurement, data collection, initial data analysis techniques. Prerequisite: two HSCI 200 division courses, one of which may be taken concurrently.

HSCI 312 - Health Promotion: Individuals and Communities (3)

Theoretical frameworks and their applications in health promotion and disease prevention. The development, implementation, and evaluation of programs aimed at individuals and communities in Canada and globally. Students with credit for HSCI 401 prior to fall 2010 may not take this course for further credit. Prerequisite: 60 units, including either HSCI 130 or KIN 140.

HSCI 330 - Exploratory Strategies in Epidemiology (3)

The concepts and measurements of human population dynamics in epidemiological inference. Identification of causes and prevalence of disease. Demographic and molecular methodology to assess the determinants of health and disease. Prerequisite: nine HSCI units including one HSCI 200 division course and either STAT 302 or 305 which may be taken concurrently.

HSCI 340 - Social Determinants of Health (3)

Social determinants of health and health inequities. Explores how and why the social advantages and disadvantages that people experience - based on their social position(s) and social circumstances - determine their health status and overall well-being. Prerequisite: 60 units and two HSCI 200-level courses, one of which may be taken concurrently.

STAT 305 - Introduction to Biostatistical Methods for Health Sciences (3)

Intermediate statistical techniques for the health sciences. Review of introductory concepts in statistics and probability including hypothesis testing, estimation and confidence intervals for means and proportions. Contingency tables and the analysis of multiple 2x2 tables. Correlation and regression. Multiple regression and model selection. Logistic regression and odds ratios. Basic concepts in survival analysis. Students cannot obtain credit for STAT 305 if they already have credit for STAT 302 or 350, or if they are simultaneously enrolled in STAT 305 and either or both of STAT 302 and 350. Prerequisite: STAT 201 or 203. Statistics major and honors students may not use this course to satisfy the required number of elective units of upper division statistics. Quantitative.

and one of

HSCI 319W - Applied Health Ethics (3)

Practical ethical and legal issues in health sciences, emphasizing population and public health. Case studies approach highlighting current ethical dilemmas and decision-making in the context of global to local legal frameworks. HSCI 319 is identical to PHIL 319 and students cannot receive credit for both courses. Prerequisite: 45 units including nine HSCI units, one of which must be a 200 division course. Writing.

HSCI 327 - Global Health Ethics (3)

Ethical issues related to public health as they are located in and influenced by a global context. Consideration of several ethical approaches including utilitarianism, deontic ethics, and the capabilities approach, as well as theories of justice. Application of approaches to topics ranging from global markets in human organs to international migration of health workers and pharmaceutical testing in the Developing World. Students who have taken HSCI 320 or PHIL 327 may not take this course for further credit. Prerequisite: 60 units of completed course work and PHIL 120 or HSCI 319W.

and one of

HSCI 481 - Senior Seminar in Social Health Science (3)

An in-depth overview of the sociocultural, epidemiological, and policy aspects of population and public health. Prerequisite: HSCI majors with 90 units, including at least 15 upper division HSCI units. Other prerequisites may vary according to topic.

HSCI 482 - Senior Seminar in Infectious Diseases (3)

An in-depth overview of newly emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases in the context of disease prevention, surveillance and control. Prerequisite: HSCI 338 - Animal Virology, MBB/HSCI 426 - Immune System I: Basis of Innate and Adaptive Immunity.

HSCI 483 - Senior Seminar in Environmental Health (3)

An in-depth overview of environmental health, environmental risks and human activity in relation to environmental health in the context of disease prevention, surveillance and control. Prerequisite: HSCI majors with 90 units, including HSCI 304 and HSCI 330.

HSCI 484 - Senior Seminar in Population Health Research (3)

Scientific research in population health. Developing and evaluating research protocols, taking a general research question and turning it into an analysis plan, carrying out the analysis, and writing up the findings for presentation and publication. Prerequisite: HSCI majors with 90 units, including HSCI 330 and STAT 302, or permission from instructor.

HSCI 485 - Senior Seminar in Mental Health and Addictions (3)

Treatment of current issues in mental health and addictions from a population and public health perspective. Students will examine several topics from theoretical, methodological and policy perspectives. Prerequisite: HSCI majors with 90 units, including at least 15 upper division HSCI units. Other prerequisites may vary according to topic.

HSCI 486 - Senior Seminar in Global Health (3)

Treatment of current global health issues. Students will examine several topics from theoretical, methodological and policy perspectives. Prerequisite: HSCI majors with 90 units, including at least 15 upper division HSCI units. Other prerequisites may vary according to topic.

and a minimum of six additional upper division courses related to the major, including at least 12 HSCI units.

Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements

Students admitted to Simon Fraser University beginning in the fall 2006 term must meet writing, quantitative and breadth requirements as part of any degree program they may undertake. See Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements for university-wide information.

WQB Graduation Requirements

A grade of C- or better is required to earn W, Q or B credit

Requirement

Units

Notes
W - Writing

6

Must include at least one upper division course, taken at Simon Fraser University within the student’s major subject
Q - Quantitative

6

Q courses may be lower or upper division
B - Breadth

18

Designated Breadth Must be outside the student’s major subject, and may be lower or upper division
6 units Social Sciences: B-Soc
6 units Humanities: B-Hum
6 units Sciences: B-Sci

6

Additional Breadth 6 units outside the student’s major subject (may or may not be B-designated courses, and will likely help fulfil individual degree program requirements)

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Residency Requirements and Transfer Credit

The University’s residency requirement stipulates that, in most cases, total transfer and course challenge credit may not exceed 60 units, and may not include more than 15 as upper division work.

Elective Courses

In addition to the courses listed above, students should consult an academic advisor to plan the remaining required elective courses.

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