i Please note:  

To view the current calendar, go to www.sfu.ca/calendar

Department of Archaeology Simon Fraser University Calendar | Spring 2015

Cultural Resource Management

Certificate

This program prepares archaeology students for part-time or full-time employment in the cultural resource management sector, which is the biggest employer of archaeologists in British Columbia. The program offers a package of courses, including the Archaeology Field School, to provide practical knowledge, skills, and experiences needed in the field of cultural resource management or other career directions.

The curriculum consists of archaeology courses, and others drawn from First Nations Studies and Geography. Earned units may be applied to the archaeology major or minor programs, and to a bachelor's degree. However, units earned in the certificate cannot be applied to another Simon Fraser University certificate or diploma.

Program Requirements

Students complete at least 31 units, of which 23 units are required core courses and the remaining 8 units are selected from the additional courses list. Students must complete a minimum of 12 units at Simon Fraser University.

Students are responsible for meeting the prerequisite requirements for courses used toward the certificate.

Core Courses

Students complete a minimum of 23 units, including all of

ARCH 372 - Material Culture Analysis (5)

Analysis and interpretation of archaeological material culture. This lecture and laboratory course combines the practical problems of recognition and interpretation of archaeological specimens, typology, seriation, and statistical procedures with the basic principles of archaeological theory. Prerequisite: ARCH 201.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Bob Muir
We 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SWH 9152, Burnaby
D101
Fr 10:30 AM – 1:20 PM
SWH 9084, Burnaby
D102
Fr 1:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SWH 9084, Burnaby
OPL1
TBD
ARCH 378 - Pacific Northwest North America (3) *

The prehistory and cultural traditions of the region. The content, antecedents, relationships, and changes in these cultures through time. Technological, socio-economic, and environmental factors in culture growth. Prerequisite: ARCH 273.

ARCH 386 - Archaeological Resource Management (3)

Surveys the origins, implementations, and need for archaeological heritage legislation on an international and national scale. Topical issues associated with contract archaeology, public archaeology, native heritage, and avocational societies are incorporated. Prerequisite: ARCH 201.

ARCH 434 - Archaeological Field Methods (3) **

A series of exercises in which the student must demonstrate the ability to apply the various recording and mapping skills covered in the course. The graded exercises are done individually and in teams, both on-campus and in the field. Prerequisite: ARCH 372 and permission of the Department. Normally taken concurrently with ARCH 433 and 435.

ARCH 435 - Field Work Practicum (6) **

A practical application of the background knowledge and specific techniques of ARCH 433 and 434. It takes place in a research oriented field excavation. Evaluation of student performance is based upon assessments of efficiency and accuracy of excavation techniques/recording procedures, and upon the student's overall contribution to the smooth functioning of the team. Prerequisite: ARCH 372 and permission of the Department. Normally taken concurrently with ARCH 433 and 434.

and one of

FNST 301 - Issues in Applied First Nations Studies Research (3)

Involves a survey and examination of method, theory and related topics associated with contemporary First Nations Studies research in applied contexts. Ethical conduct and protocols for working within First Nations communities are reviewed. Prerequisite: FNST 101 or 201 or by permission of the department.

FNST 353W - First Nations Heritage Stewardship (3)

Examines issues that arise when Aboriginal people must balance economic development and cultural integrity. Topics include self-reflexive internalist research, ethics and best practices in representing Indigenous heritage, public laws and land claim agreements affecting heritage, the exhumation and repatriation of human remains and religious freedom and access to sacred sites and objects. Students who have taken FNST 322-3 previously under this topic may not take this course for further credit. Prerequisite: 45 units or permission of the instructor. Writing.

FNST 401 - Aboriginal Rights and Government Relations (3)

An examination of First Nations and Aboriginal peoples' perspectives on political, social and legal issues involving their rights as first citizens of Canada and North America, and the practical and political relations with various levels of government. Issues examined include: Aboriginal rights and title questions, self government models and concepts, constitutional matters, the impact of federal government policies, including their impact on women's lives, and Aboriginal community and First Nations politics. Prerequisite: FNST 101 and 201. Recommended: POL 221.

FNST 403 - Indigenous Knowledge in the Modern World (3)

This course explores the subject of traditional indigenous knowledge and its contemporary implications for First Nations programs in such areas as economic development, ecotourism, spiritualism, language retention, biodiversity, ethnoscience, environmentalism, and heritage conservation. First Nations perspectives on patents, copyrights, and other creative products from traditional culture will also be examined through lecture, guest speakers and seminar presentation. Prerequisite: FNST 101 or FNST 201.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Sessional
Tu 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
SWH 9095, Burnaby

* or comparable regional course subject to departmental approval

** students who intend to complete a non-SFU field school for credit must consult the Academic Advisor for pre-approval. Field school courses must include essential skills in survey, mapping, testing, excavation, and other such standard activities.

Additional Courses

Students complete at least two (8 units) additional courses, at least one of which must be ARCH 340-5, ARCH 373-5, ARCH 388-5, ARCH 390-5, or ARCH 485-5.

ARCH 332 - Special Topics in Archaeology I (3) +

This course will be offered from time to time to meet special needs of students and to make use of specializations of visiting faculty members. Prerequisite: To be announced.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E100 Eldon Yellowhorn
We 5:30 PM – 8:20 PM
SWH 9152, Burnaby
ARCH 340 - Zooarchaeology (5)

An introduction to the study of animal remains from archaeological sites. Coverage of the major concepts and methods used in the study of animal remains and detailed practical coverage of the vertebrate skeleton. Prerequisite: ARCH 201.

ARCH 348 - Archaeological Conservation (5)

An introduction to archaeological conservation, the processes affecting the condition of archaeological materials prior to excavation, during excavation, during analysis, exhibition and during reposition. Successful completion of this course will give archaeologists a good understanding of the various materials they encounter during excavation and how to preserve these artifacts and other materials. It will not qualify students to be professional archaeological conservators. Prerequisite: Six units in Archaeology, including ARCH 201.

ARCH 363 - Landscape Archaeology (3)

The interpretation of archaeological evidence to look at the ways that people in the past perceived, constructed, and used their natural surroundings and their built environments. Prerequisite: ARCH 100 or ARCH 201, and 45 credit hours.

ARCH 373 - Human Osteology (5)

A detailed study of the human skeleton with emphasis on lab and field techniques. Prerequisite: ARCH 131.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Hugo Cardoso
Tu 8:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SWH 9152, Burnaby
D101
Th 9:30 AM – 11:20 AM
EDB 9643, Burnaby
D102
Th 11:30 AM – 1:20 PM
EDB 9643, Burnaby
OPL1
TBD
ARCH 377 - Historical Archaeology (5)

An introduction to theory and method in North American historical archaeology. Laboratory instruction is provided in historic artifact analysis and interpretation. Prerequisite: ARCH 201 and one lower division ARCH course.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Ross Jamieson
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SWH 9152, Burnaby
D101
We 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SWH 9084, Burnaby
D102
We 12:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SWH 9084, Burnaby
ARCH 388 - Geoarchaeology (5)

This course introduces the concept of archaeological sites as active constituents in natural Quaternary land-forming and land-altering systems. Lectures will focus on all processes which may have contributed to the present geomorphological contexts of archaeological sites and their sedimentary and pedological contents. Prerequisite: ARCH 201 or EASC 101 or GEOG 111.

ARCH 390 - Archaeobotany (5)

An introduction to the recovery and analysis of macroscopic archaeological plant remains. The major methodological and interpretive issues in archaeobotany will be covered, with an emphasis on plant domestication in selected regions of the world. Prerequisite: REQ-ARCH 201 and either ARCH 272/272W or 273.

ARCH 480 - Directed Laboratory/Library/Field Research (5) +

A course in which students can undertake specific laboratory, library or field based research supervised by a faculty member. It is open to students from other departments. Prerequisite: Permission of the department.

ARCH 485 - Lithic Technology (5)

An in-depth study of how to manufacture and analyze stone tools. Includes rock and mineral identification, stone working by students, fracture mechanics, and relevance to theoretical problems. Prerequisite: ARCH 372.

FNST 201 - Canadian Aboriginal Peoples' Perspectives on History (3)

An examination of fact and ideology in history and historic events involving contact between Aboriginal and European peoples. The course will also address questions of research methodologies in studying Aboriginal/European relations, such as the evaluation of oral history and written ethnohistoric sources. An additional focus will be on gender as it influences perspectives. Breadth-Social Sciences.

FNST 301 - Issues in Applied First Nations Studies Research (3)

Involves a survey and examination of method, theory and related topics associated with contemporary First Nations Studies research in applied contexts. Ethical conduct and protocols for working within First Nations communities are reviewed. Prerequisite: FNST 101 or 201 or by permission of the department.

FNST 322 - Special Topics in First Nations Studies (3) +

Variable units 3, 4, 5. Prerequisite: Will vary according to the topic.

FNST 332 - Ethnobotany of British Columbia First Nations (3)

This course is an introduction to the study of plant knowledge and use by First Nations peoples in British Columbia. It provides students with information about the role of plants in First Nations' cultures including such areas as foods, medicines, technology, ceremony, ecological indicators, and within First Nations' knowledge and classification systems. Special focus may be placed on the ethnobotany of one or more Aboriginal groups or culture areas. Prerequisite: FNST 101 or by permission of the department. Breadth-Science.

FNST 401 - Aboriginal Rights and Government Relations (3)

An examination of First Nations and Aboriginal peoples' perspectives on political, social and legal issues involving their rights as first citizens of Canada and North America, and the practical and political relations with various levels of government. Issues examined include: Aboriginal rights and title questions, self government models and concepts, constitutional matters, the impact of federal government policies, including their impact on women's lives, and Aboriginal community and First Nations politics. Prerequisite: FNST 101 and 201. Recommended: POL 221.

FNST 403 - Indigenous Knowledge in the Modern World (3)

This course explores the subject of traditional indigenous knowledge and its contemporary implications for First Nations programs in such areas as economic development, ecotourism, spiritualism, language retention, biodiversity, ethnoscience, environmentalism, and heritage conservation. First Nations perspectives on patents, copyrights, and other creative products from traditional culture will also be examined through lecture, guest speakers and seminar presentation. Prerequisite: FNST 101 or FNST 201.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Sessional
Tu 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
SWH 9095, Burnaby
GEOG 253 - Introduction to Remote Sensing (3)

An introduction to the theory and practice of remote sensing, including the relevant physical processes, digital image processing and information extraction, and a review of remote sensing applications. Prerequisite: GEOG 111. Quantitative.

GEOG 255 - Geographical Information Science I (3)

A basic overview of Geographical Information Systems and Science; GIS software, hardware, data structures and models; spatial data, operations and algorithms; practical applications and limitations. Students with credit for GEOG 354 may not take this course for further credit. Prerequisite: GEOG 100 or 111 or permission of instructor. Quantitative.

GEOG 313 - River Geomorphology (4)

Intermediate analysis in fluvial and coastal geomorphology with particular reference to British Columbia. Prerequisite: GEOG 213. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100
Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5016, Burnaby
D101
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 7108, Burnaby
D102
We 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 7108, Burnaby
D103
We 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 7108, Burnaby
GEOG 353 - Advanced Remote Sensing (4)

Advanced remote sensing principles and techniques, including physics-based modeling, advanced classifiers, automated data processing, and integration of ancillary data products. Prerequisite: GEOG 253. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5016, Burnaby
D101
Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 2109, Burnaby
D102
Th 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 2109, Burnaby
D103
Fr 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 2109, Burnaby
GEOG 355 - Geographical Information Science II (4)

An examination of technical components of GIS. Topics include spatial representations, generalization and data management; computational algebra and set theory; digital surfaces and terrain models. Prerequisite: GEOG 255. Quantitative.

GEOG 445 - Resource Planning (4)

This course introduces the student to the principles and practices of resource planning within a Canadian context. Special attention is paid to land-use planning as it relates to major resource sectors. Prerequisite: One of GEOG 322, 363, 383, or 389.

+ when topic is applicable (e.g., applied archaeology; archaeological legislation; ethics in archaeology; first nations issues in archaeology)