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Education | Faculty of Education Simon Fraser University Calendar | Summer 2019

Environmental Education

Post Baccalaureate Diploma

This program will interest practicing teachers who want to assist students to develop a greater awareness and understanding of the broadly defined environment. The program encompasses aspects of environment education. Through selected course work, environmental issues are explored using a multidisciplinary approach and historical and contemporary issues in human-environment interaction as related to diverse curricula.

Program Requirements

Successful completion, within five years, of an approved program comprised of 30 units of upper division or graduate work and any necessary prerequisites is required. A minimum of 15 of the 30 units must be earned in education and/or educational professional courses and a maximum of 12 may be transfer units.

Courses completed within 10 years of starting the post baccalaureate diploma (PBD) may, with permission, be considered as part of the requirements for this diploma.

Students must maintain a 2.5 GPA on courses used for the diploma.

Courses completed during the EDUC 404 term may not be used toward a post baccalaureate diploma.

Students complete 30 units as specified below including all of

EDUC 452 - Environmental Education (8)

Examines the educational problems entailed in developing human awareness and understanding of the environment. Explores environmental issues through a multi-disciplinary approach and relates historical and contemporary problems in human-environment interactions to school curricula from the elementary to the secondary level. Includes a laboratory component. Grading will be on a pass/fail basis. A field activity fee will be levied in this course. Normally offered in summer session only. Prerequisite: EDUC 401W/402W or corequisite EDUC 403. Students may be required to successfully complete a Criminal Record Check. Students with credit for EDUC 454 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 David Zandvliet
Fr 4:30 PM – 8:20 PM
Sa, Su 8:30 AM – 4:20 PM
HCC 2540, Vancouver
HCC 1325, Vancouver
D200 Barbara Wilson
Victor Elderton
TBD
EDUC 493 - Directed Studies in Environmental Education (4)

A multidisciplinary approach for educators in formal and informal settings with an interest in learning more about environmental issues. Students will consider multiple perspectives on the goals, values and interdisciplinary nature of environmental education, review locally available curricular materials and obtain a grounding in appropriate models for learning and teaching environmental topics. Prerequisite: 60 units and a CGPA of 3.0, EDUC 452, consent of supervising faculty member, and approval of the director of undergraduate programs. Applications are available in the undergraduate programs office.

and one of

EDUC 414 - Designs for Learning: Secondary Social Studies (4)

Focuses on teaching secondary school social studies and addresses aspects of the theory and practice of social studies education. Students examine their own thinking about social studies education through critical reflection, work with the prescribed curriculum, and explore various ways to develop engaging learning experiences for young adults within a consistent framework using appropriate instructional materials and methods. Prerequisite: EDUC 401/402 or corequisite EDUC 403.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Christine Paget
Kel McDowell
Th 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SUR 3280, Surrey
E100 Kel McDowell
Mo 5:30 PM – 9:20 PM
EDB 7509, Burnaby
F100 Isabelle Claire Côté
Mo, Th 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
EDB 7610, Burnaby
EDUC 416 - Designs for Learning: Secondary Science (4)

Focuses on teaching secondary school science. Students explore the sciences and aspects of learning science; examine their own scientific thinking; work with the prescribed curriculum; and plan science learning experiences within a consistent framework using appropriate instructional materials and methods. Prerequisite: EDUC 401/402 or corequisite EDUC 403.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Stephanie Dodier
We 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
EDB 7506, Burnaby
D200 Shannon Delawsky
TBD
E100 Mike Haffner
We 5:30 PM – 9:20 PM
EDB 7506, Burnaby
F100 Michelle Leptich
Mo, We 8:30 AM – 12:20 PM
EDB 7506, Burnaby
EDUC 474 - Designs for Learning: Elementary Social Studies (4)

Focuses on teaching elementary school social studies and addresses aspects of the theory and practice of social studies education.Students examine their own thinking about social studies education through critical reflection, work with the prescribed curriculum, and explore various ways to develop engaging learning experiences for children within a consistent framework using appropriate instructional materials and methods. Prerequisite: EDUC 401/402 or corequisite EDUC 403.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Sonja Van Der Putten
Th 8:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SUR 3270, Surrey
F100 Isabelle Claire Côté
Mo, Th 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
EDB 7610, Burnaby
EDUC 476 - Designs for Learning: Elementary Science (4)

Focuses on teaching elementary school science. Students explore science, aspects of learning science, and their own scientific thinking; work with the prescribed curriculum; and plan science learning experiences within a consistent framework using appropriate instructional materials and methods. Prerequisite: EDUC 401/402 or corequisite EDUC 403.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100 Shannon Delawsky
TBD
F100 Michelle Leptich
Mo, We 8:30 AM – 12:20 PM
EDB 7506, Burnaby

and two of

EDUC 311 - Foundations in Aboriginal Education, Language, and Culture (3)

An introduction to Aboriginal education in Canada and BC. There will be a critical examination of historical and contemporary issues in education and an exploration of culturally based Aboriginal education grounded in Aboriginal philosophies. Prerequisite: 60 units. Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Kerrie Charnley
Tu 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SUR 3200, Surrey
EDUC 433 - Philosophical Issues in Curriculum (4)

Examines fundamental philosophical issues involved in designing, evaluating, or changing educational curricula. Such issues as the nature and justification of educational curriculum, the components of a rational curriculum, the nature of knowledge and its differentiation, curriculum integration and the education of the emotions. Also deals with such current issues as the place of behavioral objectives in education, the hidden curriculum and the sociology of knowledge. Prerequisite: 60 units including six units in EDUC courses or EDUC 401/402 or corequisite EDUC 403.

EDUC 437 - Ethical Issues in Education (4)

Ethical problems in education are identified and examined. Four major areas of concern are explored: 1. the normative character of education as a whole; 2. the justification of education; 3. ethical questions related to equality, autonomy, interpersonal relationships, and rights in education; 4. moral education and values education. Prerequisite: 60 units including 3 units in Education.

Section Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
C200 Distance Education
EDUC 441 - Multicultural and Anti-racist Education (4)

Focuses on developing approaches for multicultural and anti-racist teaching. Topics include: diversity of race, language and culture among learners; identifying the operation of racism, prejudice and discrimination in classrooms and schools; becoming familiar with a variety of approaches such as: co-operative learning, culturally appropriate assessment, and community involvement to counteract and prevent negative classroom and school dynamics; identifying bias in curriculum resources; and locating entry points in selected curriculum areas (e.g. language arts, social studies, art, music, etc.) for integrating approaches which employ a range of multicultural/anti-racist curriculum resources. Prerequisite: EDUC 100, or EDUC 230, or EDUC 240, or EDUC 250, or EDUC 401/402 or Corequisite: EDUC 403.

EDUC 471 - Curriculum Development: Theory and Practice (4)

Explorations of curriculum theory and processes of development with applications at different levels and in several subject areas. Prerequisite: 60 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
C200 Distance Education
C300 Distance Education
D100 Mehran Norafkan
Th 8:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SUR 3200, Surrey
D200 Daniel Knoll
We 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
EDB 7509, Burnaby
D300 Magali Forte
Mo 8:30 AM – 12:20 PM
EDB 7509, Burnaby
D400 Joy Cochrane
TBD
E100 Daniel Knoll
Tu 5:30 PM – 9:20 PM
EDB 7600, Burnaby

and for applicants with an academic background in the humanities/social sciences, a minimum of six upper division units of

GEOG 449 - City and Environment (4)

The city as human-natural system; its processes and interactions in urban environmental policy and practice; with attention to historical and theoretical context. Prerequisite: 60 units, or enrolment in a Sustainable Community Development program; and one of GEOG 362, 363, or SCD 301.

REM 311 - Applied Ecology and Sustainable Environments (3)

Students will learn to apply the ecological concepts introduced in prereq courses to applied ecological problems at the population, community, and ecosystem levels of organization. Emphasis will be placed on processes which drive ecological dynamics, on recognizing those processes and dynamics in applied contexts, and on interpreting ecological data. Prerequisite: REM 100 or EVSC 100; BISC 204 or GEOG 215; STAT 101 or GEOG 251 or STAT 201 or equivalent. Quantitative.

REM 412 - Environmental Modeling (3)

Students receive hands-on experience in the construction and analysis of computer simulation models of environmental and ecological systems and problems. Prerequisite: REM 100 or EVSC 100; BISC 204 or GEOG 215; STAT 101 or 201 or 203 or 270 or equivalent; 60 units. Quantitative.

REM 445 - Environmental Risk Assessment (3)

Students receive theory and practical experience in the control and management of hazardous substances in the environment. This includes the application of techniques used to assess toxicological, ecological and human health risks of contaminants within the current regulatory framework. Prerequisite: MATH 151 or 154 or 157; STAT 101 or 103 or 201 or 301 or GEOG 251.

and for applicants with an academic background in the sciences/applied sciences, a minimum of six upper division units of

ECON 460 - Seminar in Environmental Economics (3)

Focus will vary from term to term. Prerequisite: ECON 302. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Kevin Wainwright
Mo 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5004, Burnaby
E100 Kevin Wainwright
Tu 5:30 PM – 8:20 PM
WMC 3511, Burnaby
GEOG 315 - World Ecosystems (4)

Distribution, structure, function, and dynamics of the world's major biomes. Attention to comparative aspects among terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and to environmental problems associated with the biomes. Prerequisite: GEOG 215 or BISC 204.

GEOG 316 - Global Biogeochemical and Water Cycles (4)

Introduction to the cycling of essential chemical elements through ecosystems. Interactions among biological, hydrological, and geological controls on the structure and function of ecosystems and the spatial-temporal scales of elemental cycling are emphasized. Environmental problems resulting from disturbance to natural equilibria in the elemental cycles are examined. Prerequisite: GEOG 215 or BISC 204 or permission of the instructor. Quantitative.

GEOG 385 - Food and the City (4)

An exploration of how food is related to cities, giving particular attention to the culture and politics of food production, distribution, and consumption. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100 or REM 100.

GEOG 389W - Nature and Society (4)

Examines the relationship between nature and society, covering the dominant geographical approaches to human-environment interaction, and their social, spatial, and political economic effects. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100 or REM 100. Writing.

GEOG 449 - City and Environment (4)

The city as human-natural system; its processes and interactions in urban environmental policy and practice; with attention to historical and theoretical context. Prerequisite: 60 units, or enrolment in a Sustainable Community Development program; and one of GEOG 362, 363, or SCD 301.

HIST 432 - Problems in Environmental History (4)

An investigation into the major themes and arguments in the environmental histories of North America, emphasizing how different individuals and groups have used, perceived, and managed their environments over time. Content may vary from offering to offering; see course outline for further information. HIST 432 may be repeated for credit only when a different topic is taught. Prerequisite: 45 units including nine units of lower division history. Students with credit for GEOG 432 may take HIST 432 for credit only when a different topic is taught.

SA 326 - Food, Ecology and Social Thought (S) (4)

Modernization narratives have placed food and agriculture on the margins of social thought. The current ecological crisis requires us to take a new look at the global agrifood system and its social, political and ecological relations. This course develops analytical perspectives on contemporary issues concerning food, ecology and agrarian change. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
J100 Ataman Avdan
Th 5:30 PM – 9:20 PM
HCC 2205, Vancouver
SA 371 - The Environment and Society (SA) (4)

An examination of environmental issues in their social context. Environmental issues are on the leading edge of contemporary public concern and public policy debates. This course will examine such issues as the relationship between social organization and mode of subsistence, the politics of hunger, and the way in which human societies in their particular social, historical, and cultural contexts view and interact with the natural world. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

Additional courses consistent with the aims of the post baccalaureate diploma (PBD) may be substituted for courses in the above list with permission from the Undergraduate Programs office. Students are responsible for prerequisites and other permissions needed to gain entry to courses listed above. Departments sometimes give course enrolment priority to their own students. Because this will reduce access to others, PBD students should consult with faculty and departmental advisors when planning their program.