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Department of Geography | Faculty of Environment Simon Fraser University Calendar | Summer 2019

Global Environmental Systems Major

Bachelor of Environment

Environmental issues facing society are complex and interdisciplinary in nature. The major in Global Environmental Systems will produce graduates knowledgeable of climate change, carbon cycles and other dimensions of global environmental change, and able to support environmental decision making with an understanding of the complexity of and interplay between socio-economic and biophysical systems at the global scale. Students will have a basic understanding of modeling, geospatial, and other analytical methods and tools, and the ability to communicate the information gained thereby. Building upon a core in the social and natural sciences, students will have a solid grounding in earth systems, the global scale, and quantitative analysis. They will have the abilities to support decision-making involving multiple systems, and to communicate scientific and technical information to a variety of audiences. The GES major is designed to provide a foundation for post-graduate education in a range of environmental disciplines that use and interpret models for understanding and prediction of global environmental change.

This major takes full advantage of the expertise existing across FENV units and include the core requirements, both lower division and upper division, characteristic of all BEnv majors. It requires an interdisciplinary core of courses from the social and natural sciences and foundational knowledge of quantitative and geospatial methods. Students seeking the GES major will be required to complete more advanced methodology courses as well as six upper-division courses in environmental systems, both social and biophysical, and a capstone course that brings these streams together.

Minimum Grades

The minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA) for continuation and graduation is 2.00.

Program Requirements

Students complete 120 units, as specified below. Additional upper division units will be required to total a minimum of 45 upper division units. Visit the program overview for a suggested course sequence.

Lower Division Requirements

Complete all of:

GEOG 100 - Our World: Introducing Human Geography (3)

A geographical introduction to how humans shape our world, with attention also given to how it shapes us. Themes may include: culture, economic activities, environmental change, globalization, politics, population, resources, and urbanization. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100 Jason Young
We 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SWH 10041, Burnaby
GEOG 111 - Earth Systems (3)

An introduction to landforms, climates, soils and vegetation; their origins, distributions, interrelationships and roles in the ecosystem. Laboratory work and field trips are included. Breadth-Science.

GEOG 214 - Weather and Climate (3)

An examination of the basic principles and processes governing the Earth's weather and climate. Topics include: radiation, greenhouse effect, clouds, precipitation, atmospheric circulation, mid-latitude cyclones, tropical storms, climate change. Prerequisite: GEOG 111. Quantitative.

GEOG 255 - Geographical Information Science I (3)

A basic overview of Geographical Information Systems and Science; GIS software, hardware, data structures and models; spatial data, operations and algorithms; practical applications and limitations. Prerequisite: GEOG 100 or 111 or permission of instructor. Students with credit for GEOG 354 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Shivanand Balram
Tu, Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 3153, Burnaby
D101
We, Fr 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 2109, Burnaby
D102
We, Fr 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 2109, Burnaby
D103
We, Fr 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 2109, Burnaby
REM 100 - Global Change (3)

This course provides students with an overview of global environmental change and its causes from a social science perspective, historically and at the present time. Population growth, an increasing ecological footprint and changes in ideology, social organization, economy and technology will be critically reviewed. New ways of thinking in natural and social science will be considered in relation to specific issues such as land, soil and food; energy, raw materials and solid waste; air pollution and transportation; water, oceans and fisheries; climate change; forestry and biodiversity; urbanization, and alternative futures. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D200 Steve Conrad
Mo, We 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
HCC 2510, Vancouver
D201
Mo, We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
HCC 2540, Vancouver
D202
Mo, We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
HCC 2540, Vancouver
D203
Mo, We 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
HCC 2925, Vancouver
REM 221 - Systems Thinking and the Environment (3)

Introduces systems thinking in the context of environmental and sustainability challenges using system archetypes and system dynamics theory. Analytical and modeling techniques are applied to understand and project systems complexity. Prerequisite: One of: Math 12 Foundations of Mathematics, Math 12 Pre-calculus, MATH 100, MATH 197 or MATH 198. And one of: EVSC 100, GEOG 102, GEOG 111 or REM 100. Students with credit for ENV 221 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Samuel Johnson
Mo, We 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
HCC 2540, Vancouver

Choose 1 of:

GEOG 251 - Quantitative Geography (3)

An introduction to basic quantitative techniques for the collection of geographic data. Topics include describing data, gathering samples, theoretical distributions, linking samples and populations, testing significance, and exploring spatial relationships all within practical, real-world application contexts. Prerequisite: GEOG 100 or 111. Quantitative.

STAT 201 - Statistics for the Life Sciences (3)

Research methodology and associated statistical analysis techniques for students with training in the life sciences. Intended to be particularly accessible to students who are not specializing in Statistics. Prerequisite: Recommended: 30 units. Students cannot obtain credit for STAT 201 if they already have credit for - or are taking concurrently - STAT 101, 203, 205, 285, or any upper division STAT course. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100 Rachel Altman
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
Fr 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SSCB 9201, Burnaby
SSCB 9201, Burnaby
OP01
TBD
STAT 203 - Introduction to Statistics for the Social Sciences (3)

Descriptive and inferential statistics aimed at students in the social sciences. Scales of measurement. Descriptive statistics. Measures of association. Hypothesis tests and confidence intervals. Students in Sociology and Anthropology are expected to take SA 255 before this course. Intended to be particularly accessible to students who are not specializing in Statistics. Prerequisite: Recommended: 30 units including a research methods course such as SA 255, CRIM 220, POL 200, or equivalent. Students cannot obtain credit for STAT 203 if they already have credit for - or are taking concurrently - STAT 101, 201, 205, 285, or any upper division STAT course. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
E100 Gamage Perera
Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
Th 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 3005, Burnaby
AQ 3005, Burnaby
OP01
TBD
STAT 205 - Introduction to Statistics (3)

The collection, description, analysis and summary of data, including the concepts of frequency distribution, parameter estimation and hypothesis testing. Intended to be particularly accessible to students who are not specializing in Statistics. Prerequisite: Recommended: 30 units. Students cannot obtain credit for STAT 205 if they already have credit for - or are taking concurrently - STAT 101, 201, 203, 285, or any upper division STAT course. Quantitative.

STAT 270 - Introduction to Probability and Statistics (3)

Basic laws of probability, sample distributions. Introduction to statistical inference and applications. Prerequisite: or Corequisite: MATH 152 or 155 or 158. Students wishing an intuitive appreciation of a broad range of statistical strategies may wish to take STAT 100 first. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100 Tim Swartz
We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
Fr 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 3182, Burnaby
AQ 3182, Burnaby
OP01
TBD

Choose 1 of:

ARCH 131 - Human Origins (3)

A non-technical survey of the primate background of humans, fossil primates, and fossil humans, and the associated evidence of cultural development. An introduction to physical anthropology. Breadth-Social Sci/Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100 Sessional
Tu 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
Th 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
BISC 101 - General Biology (4)

An introduction to the biochemical and physiological mechanisms of living organisms. Topics covered include cell structure and function, DNA replication and the flow of genetic information, enzyme function, metabolism and physiology of microorganisms, plants, and animals. Prerequisite: High school Biology 12 (or equivalent) with a C grade or better, or BISC 100 with C- or better, or BISC 113 with C+ or better, or HSCI 100 with C+ or better; and High school Chemistry 12 (or equivalent) with a C grade or better, or CHEM 111 with a C- or better. Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Ivona Mladenovic
Onkar Bains
Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
Th 9:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 3181, Burnaby
AQ 3181, Burnaby
D101 Onkar Bains
Tu 11:30 AM – 1:20 PM
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SSB 8169, Burnaby
AQ 5020, Burnaby
D106 Onkar Bains
Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
Th 11:30 AM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5025, Burnaby
SSB 8169, Burnaby
D107 Onkar Bains
Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
Th 1:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5025, Burnaby
SSB 8169, Burnaby
D108 Onkar Bains
Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
Th 3:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5020, Burnaby
SSB 8169, Burnaby
D109 Onkar Bains
We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
Fr 11:30 AM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5016, Burnaby
SSB 8169, Burnaby
BISC 102 - General Biology (4)

Survey of the diversity of life, and its evolutionary history on earth. The student is introduced to the study of genetics, development, and evolution, giving an overview of how these processes interact to produce form and function. Also included are principles of behavior and ecological relationships of organisms to each other and their environment. Prerequisite: High school biology 12 (or equivalent) with a C grade or better, or BISC 100 with C- or better, or BISC 113 with C+ or better, or HSCI 100 with C+ or better. Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Erin Barley
Tu, Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
EDB 7618, Burnaby
D101 Erin Barley
Tu 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SSCB 8212, Burnaby
RCB 6101, Burnaby
D102 Erin Barley
Tu 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SSCB 8212, Burnaby
RCB 6125, Burnaby
D103 Erin Barley
Tu 1:30 PM – 4:20 PM
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SSCB 8212, Burnaby
AQ 5009, Burnaby
D104 Erin Barley
Tu 1:30 PM – 4:20 PM
Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SSCB 8212, Burnaby
AQ 5009, Burnaby
D105 Erin Barley
Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
Th 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5009, Burnaby
SSCB 8212, Burnaby
D106 Erin Barley
Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
Th 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5020, Burnaby
SSCB 8212, Burnaby
D107 Erin Barley
Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
Th 1:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5025, Burnaby
SSCB 8212, Burnaby
HSCI 100 - Human Biology (3)

An examination of the biological processes that underlie human health and well-being, with emphasis on the evolutionary and ecological influences affecting human populations. Students with credit for BISC 101 may not take HSCI 100 for further credit. Breadth-Science.

Choose 1 of:

BISC 204 - Introduction to Ecology (3)

An introduction to biotic-environmental relationships and dynamics; ecological concepts; population dynamics, variation, adaptation and evolution. Prerequisite: BISC 101 and 102 with a grade of C- or better. Students with credit for GEOG 215 may not take this course for further credit.

EVSC 100 - Introduction to Environmental Science (3)

Introduces students to the study of environmental science. Lecture material spans contributing disciplines, emphasizing integration of diverse concepts to understand environmental problems. Tutorials develop core academic skills in environmental science context. Students who have completed EVSC 200 may not complete this course for further credit. Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Marnie Branfireun
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 3520, Burnaby
D101 Marnie Branfireun
Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
RCB 6101, Burnaby
D102 Marnie Branfireun
Tu 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
RCB 6101, Burnaby
D103 Marnie Branfireun
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
BLU 10901, Burnaby
D104 Marnie Branfireun
We 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5014, Burnaby
D105 Marnie Branfireun
Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
RCB 5125, Burnaby
D106 Marnie Branfireun
Tu 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
RCB 5125, Burnaby
GEOG 215 - Biogeography (3)

An examination of the abiotic and biotic factors that control the distribution and development of plant communities, including climatic and geological change. Prerequisite: GEOG 111. Students with credit for BISC 204 may not take this course for further credit.

Choose 1 of:

ARCH 286 - Cultural Heritage Management (4)

Examines cultural heritage management as the universal process by which people use places, objects and traditions from the past to educate, entertain, profit, promote change, maintain status quo, create identities, and build communities and nations. The course presents archaeology as one aspect of cultural heritage management and as an activity governed by national laws and international conventions for protecting and making appropriate use of heritage. Using case studies from Canada and abroad, the course explores stewardship as a fundamental professional ethic in archaeology and other fields engaged in studying, applying, and safeguarding personal, familial, communal, national, and transnational heritage. Prerequisite: 30 units including one of ARCH 100, ARCH 201, GEOG 100 or REM 100. Breadth-Humanities.

GEOG 221 - Economic Worlds (3)

The fundamentals of economics geography, the study of the forces that shape the arrangement of economic activity in the real world. Prerequisite: GEOG 100. Breadth-Social Sciences.

GEOG 241 - People, Place, Society (3)

An introduction to key concepts and contexts in contemporary geographical approaches to social practices, meanings, and struggles. Prerequisite: GEOG 100. Breadth-Social Sciences.

GEOG 261 - Encountering the City (3)

An introduction to key concepts and themes in contemporary geographical approaches to cities and urbanization. Prerequisite: GEOG 100 or 102. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Upper Division Requirements

Biophysical Systems (choose 3)

ARCH 388 - Geoarchaeology (5)

This course introduces the concept of archaeological sites as active constituents in natural Quaternary land-forming and land-altering systems. Lectures will focus on all processes which may have contributed to the present geomorphological contexts of archaeological sites and their sedimentary and pedological contents. Prerequisite: ARCH 201 or EASC 101 or GEOG 111. Students with credit for ARCH 438 may not take this course for further credit.

GEOG 213 - Introduction to Geomorphology (3)

An examination of landforms, processes, laws, and theories of development; types and distributions. Prerequisite: GEOG 111 or EASC 101. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

GEOG 311 - Hydrology (4)

Introduction to the hydrologic cycle, with an emphasis on the hydrology of British Columbia; description and analysis of the processes of water movement and storage measurements and analysis of hydrologic data. Prerequisite: GEOG 213 or 214; GEOG 251 or one of STAT 201, 203 (formerly 103), 205, or 270. Quantitative.

GEOG 312 - Geography of Natural Hazards (4)

An introduction to the occurrence and origin of natural hazards such as volcanic eruptions, landslides, etc. Interaction between the relevant natural processes and society will be examined, as well as prediction of natural events and the amelioration of the effects of such events within different cultural contexts. Prerequisite: GEOG 111 or EASC 101. Students with credit for GEOG 212 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
GEOG 313 - River Geomorphology (4)

Intermediate analysis in fluvial and coastal geomorphology with particular reference to British Columbia. Prerequisite: GEOG 213. Quantitative.

GEOG 314 - The Climate System (4)

A survey of the climate system, with emphasis on the interactions among its components; radiation, energy and water balances; climate sensitivity and feedbacks; natural and anthropogenic climate change; climate models. Prerequisite: GEOG 214. Recommended: MATH 151 and 152 or MATH 154 and 155 or MATH 157 and 158. Quantitative.

GEOG 315 - World Ecosystems (4)

Distribution, structure, function, and dynamics of the world's major biomes. Attention to comparative aspects among terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and to environmental problems associated with the biomes. Prerequisite: GEOG 215 or BISC 204.

GEOG 316 - Global Biogeochemical and Water Cycles (4)

Introduction to the cycling of essential chemical elements through ecosystems. Interactions among biological, hydrological, and geological controls on the structure and function of ecosystems and the spatial-temporal scales of elemental cycling are emphasized. Environmental problems resulting from disturbance to natural equilibria in the elemental cycles are examined. Prerequisite: GEOG 215 or BISC 204 or permission of the instructor. Quantitative.

GEOG 317 - Soil Science (4)

An introduction to the study of soils: physical, chemical and biological properties of soils; soil formation, description, classification, survey and use. Field and laboratory techniques of soil analysis. Prerequisite: One of GEOG 213, 214, 215, or CHEM 121. Students with credit for GEOG 318 may not take this course for further credit.

REM 370 - Global Resource Issues in Oceanography (3)

Introduces principles of oceanography, including ocean circulation, ocean carbon cycling, nutrients and biological productivity, oceans and the climate system, and ocean resource contributions to global food supply. Provides basic understanding of ocean resource management including transportation, recreation, fisheries, and mining. Prerequisite: EASC 100, EVSC 100, GEOG 111, or REM 100.

REM 471 - Forest Ecosystem Management (3)

Students will examine the problems of managing forest ecosystems for a variety of societal goals and objectives. The course will start with an examination of the ecological characteristics of forest ecosystems and their dynamics. The second section will focus on the objectives and tools of forest management in an ecological context. The final section of the course will focus on the institutions, economics and policies of forest management, with a focus on British Columbia's historical and current management issues. This course will involve lectures, group discussions, field trips, and exercises. Prerequisite: At least one of REM 311, BISC 304, BISC 310, BISC 404, GEOG 315, or GEOG 316.

Socio-economic Systems (choose 3)

ARCH 363 - Landscape Archaeology (3)

The interpretation of archaeological evidence to look at the ways that people in the past perceived, constructed, and used their natural surroundings and their built environments. Prerequisite: ARCH 100 or ARCH 201, and 45 credit hours.

ARCH 365 - Archaeological Perspectives on Human Ecology (3)

Examines methods, theories, and concepts for understanding how past cultures interacted with their bio-physical surroundings. Integrates diverse kinds of data and knowledge to understand these relationships. Topics to be addressed include local and traditional ecological knowledge, paleoenvironmental reconstruction, human-environment interaction, human-induced environmental changes, paleodiet, and domestication. Prerequisite: ARCH 201; or any two of ARCH 100, REM 100, GEOG 100, EVSC 100; and 45 credits.

GEOG 321 - Geographies of Global Capitalism (4)

Examines the historical development, spatial organization, and social impact of market function, firm structure and operation, economic policy, and regulation and deregulation at various scales from local to global, from a geographical perspective. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100.

GEOG 322W - World Resources (4)

An analysis of the use and development of natural resources from a geographic, economic and institutional perspective. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100. Students with credit for GEOG 322 may not take this course for further credit. Writing.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 John Irwin
Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 8100, Burnaby
D101
Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
BLU 10031, Burnaby
D102
Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
BLU 10031, Burnaby
D103
Fr 9:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB 6101, Burnaby
GEOG 382 - World on the Move (4)

The world is on the move. Migrants seeking better opportunities cross paths with refugees fleeing persecution. Some are helped and welcomed, many encounter barriers and threats, while identities, including class, race, gender, sexuality, mediate their prospects. This course's geographic perspective clarifies these complexities by combining conceptual analyses with contemporary cases. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100.

GEOG 389W - Nature and Society (4)

Examines the relationship between nature and society, covering the dominant geographical approaches to human-environment interaction, and their social, spatial, and political economic effects. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100 or REM 100. Writing.

GEOG 428 - World Forests (4)

Comparative analysis of forest industries, ecosystems and policies, and their lessons for forest management in British Columbia. Topics include tropical deforestation and carbon sequestration, the wilderness debate, and forests in culture and the visual arts. Prerequisite: GEOG 315, or 322, or 389.

POL 346 - International Organization (4)

An examination of the structures and processes and the main substantive decisions of the United Nations and related international organizations. Based upon in-depth study of the UN Charter, the Security Council, General Assembly, Secretary-general and Secretariat and their constitutional and political interactions since 1945, with special attention to the theory and practice of international organization advanced by the principal Western countries, the Soviet Union and Soviet bloc, the People's Republic of China and leading Third World countries. Prerequisite: Six lower division units in political science or permission of the department.

POL 452W - Energy Policy (4)

Examines the politics and policies of energy, including historical and technical perspectives. Topics include alternative energy, climate change, regulatory policy, and the economics of energy, as well as practical case studies. Students who have completed POL 459 in 2009 and 2010 may not complete this course for further credit. Writing.

REM 321 - Ecological Economics (4)

Introduces students to the concepts and methods of ecological economics. Provides students with grounding in the core principles of conventional economics applied to the environment but then extends this to the integration of economics and ecology to create a new ecological-economic understanding of environmental change and sustainability. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students with credit for ENV 321 cannot take REM 321 for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

REM 350 - Sustainable Energy and Materials Management (4)

Takes an interdisciplinary approach to sustainable management of society's energy and materials flows. Topics range from thermodynamics and estimates of global resources to market-based policies and governance Institutions. Peak oil, renewable energy and carbon capture and storage are also discussed. The role for green consumerism in light of climate challenge are highlighted. Prerequisite: 45 units.

REM 356 - Institutional Arrangements for Sustainable Environmental Management (3)

This course provides an overview of some basic legislation, agencies, and policies which currently are in use to regulate the natural environment at the international, nation, provincial, regional, and local levels. Its purpose is to present a basic set of evaluative questions which can be used to address the effectiveness and efficiency of the environmental regulatory and management systems currently in use. Prerequisite: REM 100. Students with credit for REM 356W may not take this course for further credit.

SA 371 - The Environment and Society (SA) (4)

An examination of environmental issues in their social context. Environmental issues are on the leading edge of contemporary public concern and public policy debates. This course will examine such issues as the relationship between social organization and mode of subsistence, the politics of hunger, and the way in which human societies in their particular social, historical, and cultural contexts view and interact with the natural world. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

SD 401 - Sustainable Development Goals Studio (4)

Engages students in creating innovative solutions to real-world challenges of sustainability and development, using studio-based approaches. Explores the Sustainable Development Goals as a mechanism for effective governance in the context of Global North-South relations, and develops policies and strategies for implementing the Goals at local and global scales. Prerequisite: 60 units or admission to the Post Baccalaureate Diploma in Sustainable Development. Recommended: SD 281 or equivalent. Students with credit for DEVS 401 may not take this course for further credit.

Data Acquisition, Analysis and Modeling (choose 3)

ARCH 285 - Archaeological Science (4)

Introduces scientific techniques used for archaeological investigations. Prerequisite: One of ARCH 100, ARCH 201, BISC 101, CHEM 111, CHEM 121, EVSC 100, GEOG 111, PHYS 101 or PHYS 120. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

GEOG 253 - Introduction to Remote Sensing (3)

An introduction to the theory and practice of remote sensing, including the relevant physical processes, digital image processing and information extraction, and a review of remote sensing applications. Prerequisite: GEOG 111. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

GEOG 352 - Spatial Analysis (4)

Advanced quantitative techniques for spatial analysis of geographic data and patterns. Topics include geostatistics, spatial interpolation, autocorrelation, kriging, and their use in geographic problem solving with spatial analysis software. Prerequisite: GEOG 251 or one of STAT 201, 203 (formerly 103), 205, or 270. Quantitative.

GEOG 353 - Advanced Remote Sensing (4)

Advanced remote sensing principles and techniques, including physics-based modeling, advanced classifiers, automated data processing, and integration of ancillary data products. Prerequisite: GEOG 253. Quantitative.

GEOG 414 - Climate Change (4)

An examination of recent advances in climate change science drawing upon observational and theoretical studies; application of climate models. Prerequisite: GEOG 314. Quantitative.

GEOG 451 - Spatial Modeling (4)

Spatial models for the representation and simulation of physical, human and environmental processes. GIS and spatial analysis software are used in the laboratory for model development, from problem definition and solution to visualization. Prerequisite: GEOG 251 or one of STAT 201, 203 (formerly 103), 205, or 270; one of GEOG 351, 352, 353, 355 or 356. Quantitative.

GEOG 453 - Theoretical and Applied Remote Sensing (4)

Examination of advanced topics in remote sensing, including calibration /validation, spatial scale, data fusion, and the role of remote sensing in a spatial world. Students will work on independent projects applying remote sensing in their area of interest. Prerequisite: GEOG 353. Recommended: One of GEOG 351, 352, 355 or 356. Students with credit for GEOG 453W may not repeat this course for further credit. Quantitative.

REM 311 - Applied Ecology and Sustainable Environments (3)

Students will learn to apply the ecological concepts introduced in prereq courses to applied ecological problems at the population, community, and ecosystem levels of organization. Emphasis will be placed on processes which drive ecological dynamics, on recognizing those processes and dynamics in applied contexts, and on interpreting ecological data. Prerequisite: REM 100 or EVSC 100; BISC 204 or GEOG 215; STAT 101 or GEOG 251 or STAT 201 or equivalent. Quantitative.

REM 412 - Environmental Modeling (3)

Students receive hands-on experience in the construction and analysis of computer simulation models of environmental and ecological systems and problems. Prerequisite: REM 100 or EVSC 100; BISC 204 or GEOG 215; STAT 101 or 201 or 203 or 270 or equivalent; 60 units. Quantitative.

Communication (choose 1)

CMNS 342 - Science and Public Policy: Risk Communication (4)

The course examines communication in the relation between science (technology) and public policy, and more particularly, in the evaluation of risk. Prerequisite: Two of CMNS 201 (or 260 or equivalent - BUEC 232, PSYC 210, STAT 100, 201, 203, 205, 270, 285, SA 255), CMNS 202 (or 262), or CMNS 261.

CMNS 349 - Environment, Media and Communication (4)

An examination of how media, culture and communication shape public opinion and behaviour about environmental issues such as global warming, (un)sustainable resource use and pollution, with special attention to the impact of practices such as advertising, public relations, science and risk communication, journalism and advocacy communication upon public discourse about the environment, and the role of dialogue and deliberation in mediating and resolving conflict over environmental issues. Prerequisite: 45 units, including at least one upper division course in CMNS, DIAL, EVSC, GEOG or BlSC.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Darren Fleet
Mo 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
HCC 1800, Vancouver
D101
Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
HCC 2205, Vancouver
D102
Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
HCC 2205, Vancouver
D103
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
HCC 2205, Vancouver
D104
Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
HCC 2205, Vancouver
D105
Mo 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
HCC 2205, Vancouver
GEOG 351 - Multimedia Cartography (4)

Elements of cartographic analysis, design and visualization, with an emphasis on digital mapping, animation techniques, cartographic software and internet mapping. Prerequisite: GEOG 255. Quantitative.

GEOG 356 - 3D Geovisualization (4)

3D geovisualization methods, concepts and theory. Bridges conventional geographic visualization with emerging 3D methods. Emphasizes user-centered design and cognitive implications. Prerequisite: GEOG 255.

Capstone (choose 1)

ENV 495 - Environmental Capstone (4)

This project-based course, to be taken in the final year of undergraduate study, will provide students with an opportunity to integrate and demonstrate the knowledge and skills gained through their undergraduate study. Projects involve collaborative work, analytical methodologies and communication of environmental complexity. Prerequisite: 90 units.

In special cases, the Director may approve substitutes for the capstone, such as ENV 491 (Directed Study in Environment).

Three lower division courses (ARCH 285, GEOG 213 and GEOG 253) can be used to satisfy some of upper division requirements of this major, but do not count towards the graduation requirement of 45 upper division units. Additional courses may be required to satisfy WQB requirements, but an interdisciplinary major such as Global Environmental Systems already includes numerous courses that meet Quantitative requirements.

Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements

Students admitted to Simon Fraser University beginning in the fall 2006 term must meet writing, quantitative and breadth requirements as part of any degree program they may undertake. See Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements for university-wide information.

WQB Graduation Requirements

A grade of C- or better is required to earn W, Q or B credit

Requirement

Units

Notes
W - Writing

6

Must include at least one upper division course, taken at Simon Fraser University within the student’s major subject
Q - Quantitative

6

Q courses may be lower or upper division
B - Breadth

18

Designated Breadth Must be outside the student’s major subject, and may be lower or upper division
6 units Social Sciences: B-Soc
6 units Humanities: B-Hum
6 units Sciences: B-Sci

6

Additional Breadth 6 units outside the student’s major subject (may or may not be B-designated courses, and will likely help fulfil individual degree program requirements)

Students choosing to complete a joint major, joint honours, double major, two extended minors, an extended minor and a minor, or two minors may satisfy the breadth requirements (designated or not designated) with courses completed in either one or both program areas.

 

Residency Requirements and Transfer Credit

  • At least half of the program's total units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.
  • At least two thirds of the program's total upper division units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.