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Philosophy and Health Sciences Joint Major

Bachelor of Arts

Students may opt for a Bachelor of Arts through the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences or a Bachelor of Arts through the Faculty of Health Sciences. Faculty degree requirements will be governed by the faculty through which the student chooses to complete the degree.

Admission Requirements

To be admitted to the joint major in Philosophy and Health Sciences, students must complete (A) one of the following HSCI courses with a minimum grade of C-: HSCI 211- 3, HSCI 212-3, HSCI 214-3, HSCI 215-3 or HSCI 216-3; and (B) one of the following PHIL courses with a minimum grade of C-: PHIL 201 or PHIL 203.

Program Requirements

Courses used toward the upper division philosophy requirements may not be used as part of health sciences credit requirements, and vice versa. Any lower division course that counts toward the separate requirements for philosophy and health sciences may be counted toward both.

Students are required to satisfy the prerequisites of all courses (upper and lower division) that are taken within this joint major and should consult regularly with the program advisors regarding course selection.

Students complete 120 units, as specified below.

Lower Division Health Sciences Requirements

Students complete a minimum of 15 units, including all of

HSCI 100 - Human Biology (3)

An examination of the biological processes that underlie human health and well-being, with emphasis on the evolutionary and ecological influences affecting human populations. Students with credit for BISC 101 may not take HSCI 100 for further credit. Breadth-Science.

HSCI 130 - Foundations of Health Science (4)

How health, illness and disease are defined and measured for individuals and populations. Research strategies used to identify how health, illness and disease are distributed across human populations and how environmental, socio-economic, demographic, biological, behavioural and political factors influence individual and population health. Breadth-Social Sci/Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Myint Tun
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 3182, Burnaby
AQ 3182, Burnaby
D101
Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
BLU 9011, Burnaby
D102
Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
BLU 11401, Burnaby
D103
Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
BLU 10401, Burnaby
D104
We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
BLU 10401, Burnaby
D200 Myint Tun
Mo 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SUR 3090, Surrey
SUR 3090, Surrey
D201
Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SUR 3270, Surrey
D202
We 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SUR 3270, Surrey

and at least two of

HSCI 211 - Perspectives on Cancer, Cardiovascular, and Metabolic Diseases (3)

An interdisciplinary overview of the major non-communicable diseases - cancers, cardiovascular and metabolic diseases - from a public health perspective. Review of biological mechanisms, risk factors, historical and cultural contexts, and global distribution. Prerequisite: HSCI 100 or BISC 101, HSCI 130.

HSCI 212 - Perspectives on Infectious and Immunological Diseases (3)

An integrated survey of infectious diseases and their social and economic causes and consequences. Infectious agents, including bacteria, protozoa, fungi and viruses -- how they spread, how they work, and how they can be stopped. Surveillance, prevention, and management of infectious diseases and epidemics. Prerequisite: HSCI 100 or BISC 101, HSCI 130.

HSCI 214 - Perspectives on Mental Health and Illness (3)

An interdisciplinary overview of mental health and mental illness among populations. A review of the distribution and risk factors of mental illnesses as well as the historical and cultural context of their development. Prerequisite: HSCI 100 or BISC 101, HSCI 130.

HSCI 215 - Perspectives on Disability and Injury (3)

An interdisciplinary overview of injury and disability. Review of global distribution and risk factors. Examination of disability and injury across multiple levels of analysis. Prerequisite: HSCI 100 or BISC 101, HSCI 130.

HSCI 216 - Ecological Determinants of Human Growth, Development and Health (3)

Effects that social and ecological factors have on human growth, development and health. Challenges such as epidemics, natural catastrophes, industrialization, globalization, migration, poverty, war, global warming, etc, leading to evolution and adaptations. Relationships between socio-ecological challenges, their health consequences and related gene-population variations and effects on growth, development, sexual maturation, reproductive investment, and senescence and health. Prerequisite: HSCI 100 or BISC 101.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Pablo Nepomnaschy
Mo, We 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCB 9201, Burnaby
D101
Tu, Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
BLU 10401, Burnaby
D102
Tu, Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
BLU 11401, Burnaby
D103
Tu, Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
BLU 10401, Burnaby
D104
Tu, Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
BLU 11401, Burnaby
D105
Tu, Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
BLU 10401, Burnaby
D106
Tu, Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
BLU 11401, Burnaby
D107
Tu, Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
BLU 10401, Burnaby
D108
Tu 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
BLU 11401, Burnaby
BLU 9920, Burnaby

and one of

STAT 201 - Statistics for the Life Sciences (3)

Research methodology and associated statistical analysis techniques for students with training in the life sciences. Intended to be particularly accessible to students who are not specializing in Statistics. Prerequisite: Recommended: 30 units. Students cannot obtain credit for STAT 201 if they already have credit for - or are taking concurrently - STAT 101, 203, 205, 285, or any upper division STAT course. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100 Rachel Altman
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
Fr 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SSCB 9201, Burnaby
SSCB 9201, Burnaby
OP01
TBD
STAT 203 - Introduction to Statistics for the Social Sciences (3)

Descriptive and inferential statistics aimed at students in the social sciences. Scales of measurement. Descriptive statistics. Measures of association. Hypothesis tests and confidence intervals. Students in Sociology and Anthropology are expected to take SA 255 before this course. Intended to be particularly accessible to students who are not specializing in Statistics. Prerequisite: Recommended: 30 units including a research methods course such as SA 255, CRIM 220, POL 200, or equivalent. Students cannot obtain credit for STAT 203 if they already have credit for - or are taking concurrently - STAT 101, 201, 205, 285, or any upper division STAT course. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
E100 Gamage Perera
Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
Th 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 3005, Burnaby
AQ 3005, Burnaby
OP01
TBD

Lower Division Philosophy Requirements

In selecting lower division courses, students are advised to consider the prerequisite structure for upper division courses in philosophy.

Students complete a minimum of 12 units, including at least one of

PHIL 100W - Knowledge and Reality (3)

An introduction to some of the central problems of philosophy. Topics to be discussed include the different theories of reality; the nature and sources of knowledge, truth, evidence, and reason; the justification of belief and knowledge about the universe. These topics and problems will be considered as they arise in the context of issues such as: relativism versus absolutism; the existence of God; personal identity; the nature of the mind and its relation to the body; free will and determinism; the possibility of moral knowledge. Open to all students. Students with credit for PHIL 100 may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Martin Hahn
Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 3520, Burnaby
SSCB 9201, Burnaby
D101
Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
RCB 6122, Burnaby
D103
Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB 6122, Burnaby
D104
Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
BLU 10901, Burnaby
D105
Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 6100, Burnaby
D106
Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D108
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB 5100, Burnaby
D109
Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5015, Burnaby
D110
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 6122, Burnaby
D111
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 6100, Burnaby
D112
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB 6122, Burnaby
D113
Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 6101, Burnaby
PHIL 120W - Moral Problems (3)

A critical examination of a range of questions and problems we confront as moral agents, such as: the nature and scope of our moral responsibilities, the source of our moral and civil rights, and the role of moral emotions, like resentment, love and forgiveness. Students with credit for PHIL 120 may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Chelsea Rosenthal
Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SSCC 9001, Burnaby
SSCC 9001, Burnaby
D102
Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
RCB 5100, Burnaby
D103
Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5038, Burnaby
D104
Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB 5120, Burnaby
D105
Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5014, Burnaby
D106
Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 7105, Burnaby
D107
Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 6122, Burnaby
D108
Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5015, Burnaby
D111
Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 5125, Burnaby
D113
Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5015, Burnaby
D114
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D115
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5015, Burnaby
D116
Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
PHIL 121 - Global Justice (3)

An introduction to the ethical issues arising from interactions of states, NGOs and other international agents. Topics may include international human rights, terrorism, war, gender justice, climate justice, fairness in international trade, cultural diversity and conflict, the rights of indigenous peoples, collective responsibility and restitution for historical wrongdoing, among others. Students who have received credit for PHIL 220 cannot receive credit for this course. Breadth-Humanities/Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E100 Brian Thomas
We 5:30 PM – 8:20 PM
HCC 1600, Vancouver
PHIL 144 - Introduction to Philosophy of Science (3)

An introduction to philosophical issues concerning the nature of science. Topics to be discussed include the distinction between science and pseudo-science, the nature of scientific method, the nature of explanation in the natural and social sciences, the phenomenon of scientific change, the relationship between scientific theory and observation, and the objectivity of social science. Students with credit for PHIL 244 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities/Sciences.

PHIL 150 - Great Works in the History of Philosophy (3)

A thematic survey of some classical texts in the history of Western philosophy, from late Antiquity to the 19th century, including by figures such as Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Descartes, de Gournay, Elisabeth of Bohemia, Spinoza, Leibniz, du Ch√Ętelet, Hume, Astell, Wollstonecraft, Kant, Mill, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, and others. Themes may include the nature of the human being, the role of God in philosophical thought, conceptions of the good life, and others. Open to all students. Students with credit for PHIL 151 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities.

and

PHIL 110 - Introduction to Logic and Reasoning (3)

The aim of this course is to familiarize students with fundamental techniques of correct reasoning. Special attention is given to the methods of logic in particular, and to their role in the discovery of truth not only within science and philosophy but within all forms of rational enquiry. Open to all students. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Nicolas Fillion
Mo, We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SSCB 9201, Burnaby
D101
Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5036, Burnaby
D102
Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5028, Burnaby
D103
Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5017, Burnaby
D104
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB 6101, Burnaby
D105
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB 5125, Burnaby
D106
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SWH 10075, Burnaby
D107
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5020, Burnaby
D108
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SWH 10075, Burnaby
D110
We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5014, Burnaby
D111
We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SWH 10075, Burnaby
D112
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5009, Burnaby
D113
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SWH 10075, Burnaby
D114
We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
BLU 11911, Burnaby
D115
We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SWH 10075, Burnaby
D116
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5036, Burnaby

and two of

PHIL 201 - Epistemology (3)

A critical overview of recent accounts of the nature and scope of human knowledge and of justified or rational belief, and of philosophical issues that these accounts are intended to address. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 100W (or equivalent), 120W (or equivalent), 121, 144, 150, 151, or COGS 100. Students who have taken PHIL 301 cannot take this course for further credit.

PHIL 203 - Metaphysics (3)

An examination of central problems of metaphysics such as space and time, universals and particulars, substance, identity and individuation and personal identity. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 100W (or equivalent), 120W (or equivalent), 121, 144, 150, 151, or COGS 100.

PHIL 221 - Ethical Theory (3)

An examination of the major ethical theories, including deontology, consequentialism and virtue ethics. Applications of theses theories and related topics in value theory may also be discussed. Prerequisite: One of: PHIL 100W (or equivalent), PHIL 120W (or equivalent), PHIL 121, PHIL 144, PHIL 150 or PHIL 151.

Upper Division Health Sciences Requirements

Students complete a minimum of 21 upper division health sciences units, including all of

HSCI 305 - The Canadian Health System (3)

A comparative analysis of the Canadian health care financing and delivery systems and policies. History, organizational principles, health care resources, costs, access to care, quality, and equity. Societal and political issues, threats and values that affect Canada's health care system and others around the world. Prerequisite: 60 units, including nine HSCI units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Genevieve Breau
Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 3153, Burnaby
D101
Tu 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
BLU 9011, Burnaby
D102
Tu 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
BLU 9021, Burnaby
D103
Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
BLU 9011, Burnaby
D104
Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
BLU 9021, Burnaby
HSCI 319W - Applied Health Ethics (3)

Practical ethical and legal issues in health sciences, emphasizing population and public health. Case studies approach highlighting current ethical dilemmas and decision-making in the context of global to local legal frameworks. Prerequisite: 45 units including nine HSCI units, one of which must be a 200 division course. HSCI 319 is identical to PHIL 319 and students cannot receive credit for both courses. Writing.

HSCI 327 - Global Health Ethics (3)

Ethical issues related to public health as they are located in and influenced by a global context. Consideration of several ethical approaches including utilitarianism, deontic ethics, and the capabilities approach, as well as theories of justice. Application of approaches to topics ranging from global markets in human organs to international migration of health workers and pharmaceutical testing in the Developing World. Prerequisite: 60 units and one of PHIL 120W (or equivalent), 121, or 221; or HSCI 319W. Students who have taken HSCI 320 or PHIL 327 may not take this course for further credit.

HSCI 330 - Exploratory Strategies in Epidemiology (3)

The concepts and measurements of human population dynamics in epidemiological inference. Identification of causes and prevalence of disease. Demographic and molecular methodology to assess the determinants of health and disease. Prerequisite: nine HSCI units including one HSCI 200 division course and either STAT 302 or 305 which may be taken concurrently.

Section Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
HSCI 340 - Social Determinants of Health (3)

Social determinants of health and health inequities. Explores how and why the social advantages and disadvantages that people experience - based on their social position(s) and social circumstances - determine their health status and overall well-being. Prerequisite: 60 units and two HSCI 200-level courses, one of which may be taken concurrently.

HSCI 488 - Directed Studies in Health Sciences (3)

Independent studies on topics selected in consultation with the supervising instructor. A student will be permitted to enroll in this course only if she or he obtains the prior written agreement of a professor who will act as research supervisor.

and one of

STAT 302 - Analysis of Experimental and Observational Data (3)

The standard techniques of multiple regression analysis, analysis of variance, and analysis of covariance, and their role in observational and experimental studies. This course may not be used to satisfy the upper division requirements of the Statistics major or honours program. Prerequisite: Any STAT course (except STAT 100) or BUEC 232. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100 Michael Davis
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
OP01
TBD
STAT 305 - Introduction to Biostatistical Methods for Health Sciences (3) *

Intermediate statistical techniques for the health sciences. Review of introductory concepts in statistics and probability including hypothesis testing, estimation and confidence intervals for means and proportions. Contingency tables and the analysis of multiple 2x2 tables. Correlation and regression. Multiple regression and model selection. Logistic regression and odds ratios. Basic concepts in survival analysis. This course may not be used to satisfy the upper division requirements of the Statistics major or honours program. Prerequisite: Any STAT course (except STAT 100) or BUEC 232. Quantitative.

* Recommended

Upper Division Philosophy Requirements

Students complete a total of 20 upper division philosophy units, including at least one of

PHIL 320 - Social and Political Philosophy (3)

An examination of an issue or selection of issues in social and political philosophy. Contemporary or historical readings or a mixture of these will be used. Possible topics include: justice, the law and legal systems, sovereignty, power and authority, democracy, liberty and equality. Sometimes the course will focus on the views of historically important political philosophers, such as Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Burke, Bentham, Mill and Marx. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 120W (or equivalent), 121, 220, 221 or ENV 320W.

PHIL 321 - Topics in Moral Philosophy (3)

An advanced investigation of central issues and theories in moral philosophy. In any given term, the course may focus on a general theory or concept or concern, for example meta-ethics, utilitarianism, or theories of rights. Sometimes it will focus on a particular problem or problems, such as medical ethics, moral personhood, or free will and moral responsibility. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 120W (or equivalent), 121, 220, 221 or ENV 320W.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Brian Thomas
Tu 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
RCB 6125, Burnaby
PHIL 322 - History of Ethics (3)

An examination of an issue or selection of issues in the history of moral or political philosophy. Historical readings will be the primary focus and may include important figures such as Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Hume, and Kant. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 120W (or equivalent), 121, 150, 151, 220 or 221.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Brian Thomas
Th 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5007, Burnaby

and at least one of

PHIL 302 - Topics in Epistemology and Metaphysics (3)

An exploration of philosophical issues concerning, e.g.: causation, time, modality, or the self; the realism/nominalism or realism/idealism debate; relativism; the concept of truth; naturalized epistemology; global epistemological skepticism or perhaps a 'local' form of skepticism such as skepticism about induction or about sensory belief. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: PHIL 201 or 203.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 David Heide
Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
Th 9:30 AM – 11:20 AM
WMC 2202, Burnaby
WMC 2220, Burnaby
PHIL 341 - Philosophy of Science (3)

A study of the nature of scientific enquiry, classificatory systems, laws and theories, the role of observation in science, the demarcation between science and non-science, causality, the status of theoretical constructs, and teleological explanation. Prerequisite: Either one of: PHIL 201 or 203; or both of PHIL 100W (or equivalent) and COGS 200.

PHIL 343 - Philosophy of Mind (3)

A study of theories of the mind, consciousness, and human action. Prerequisite: Either one of: PHIL 201 or 203; or both of PHIL 100W (or equivalent) and COGS 200.

PHIL 344 - Philosophy of Language (3)

An introduction to the major philosophic theories of language. Topics to be considered include the relationship between language and mind, language and the world, language and society. Prerequisite: Either one of: PHIL 201 or 203; or both of PHIL 100W (or equivalent) and COGS 200.

PHIL 345W - Philosophy of Mathematics (3)

Examines central philosophical issues related to mathematics. Topics may include the metaphysical status of mathematical entities, mathematical knowledge, set theory and others. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 110, 210, 314, 315 or MACM 101; and one of PHIL 100W, 201 or 203. Writing.

and at least one of

PHIL 322 - History of Ethics (3) *

An examination of an issue or selection of issues in the history of moral or political philosophy. Historical readings will be the primary focus and may include important figures such as Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Hume, and Kant. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 120W (or equivalent), 121, 150, 151, 220 or 221.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Brian Thomas
Th 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5007, Burnaby
PHIL 350 - Ancient Philosophy (3)

Examines central philosophical themes and figures in ancient philosophy. Topics may include justice, knowledge, the good life, time, change, appearance and reality, the nature of God, and others. Historical readings will be the central focus and may include works by Plato, Aristotle, Thales, Anaximander, Pythagoras, Parmenides and others. Prerequisite: PHIL 150 or 151.

PHIL 352 - 17th Century Philosophy (3)

An examination of some central issues in 17th century philosophy. Themes may include: changing theories of causation, of the mind, and of the relation between mind and world. Historical readings will be the primary focus and may include important figures such as Descartes, Elisabeth of Bohemia, Malebranche, Spinoza, Leibniz, and Locke. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 150 or 151. Students who have completed PHIL 353 or PHIL 354 prior to Fall 2006 may not take this course for further credit.

PHIL 356 - 18th Century Philosophy (3)

An examination of some central issues of 18th century philosophy. Themes may include the development of the theory of ideas and epistemology associated with it. The primary focus may include important figures such as Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Condillac. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 150 or 151. Students with credit for PHIL 355 prior to Fall 2006 may not take this course for further credit.

PHIL 357 - Topics in the History of Philosophy (3)

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: PHIL 150 or 151.

PHIL 358 - 19th Century Philosophy (3)

An examination of some major figures in 19th century philosophy. Themes may include German idealism and romanticism, British idealism, positivism and American pragmatism; studied figures may include Schopenhauer, Fichte, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, Comte, Kierkegaard, Brentano, Meinong, Mill, Pierce and James, depending on theme. Prerequisite: PHIL 150 or 151.

and at least one 400 division philosophy course.

* if not taken in satisfaction of requirement above

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Degree Requirements

For all bachelor of arts (BA) programs, students complete 120 units, which includes

  • at least 60 units that must be completed at Simon Fraser University
  • at least 45 upper division units, of which at least 30 upper division units must be completed at Simon Fraser University
  • at least 65 units (including 21 upper division units) in Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences courses
  • satisfaction of the writing, quantitative, and breadth requirements
  • an overall cumulative grade point average (CGPA) and upper division CGPA of at least 2.0, and a program (major, joint major, extended minor, minor) CGPA and upper division CGPA of at least 2.0

Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements

Students admitted to Simon Fraser University beginning in the fall 2006 term must meet writing, quantitative and breadth requirements as part of any degree program they may undertake. See Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements for university-wide information.

WQB Graduation Requirements

A grade of C- or better is required to earn W, Q or B credit

Requirement

Units

Notes
W - Writing

6

Must include at least one upper division course, taken at Simon Fraser University within the student’s major subject
Q - Quantitative

6

Q courses may be lower or upper division
B - Breadth

18

Designated Breadth Must be outside the student’s major subject, and may be lower or upper division
6 units Social Sciences: B-Soc
6 units Humanities: B-Hum
6 units Sciences: B-Sci

6

Additional Breadth 6 units outside the student’s major subject (may or may not be B-designated courses, and will likely help fulfil individual degree program requirements)

Students choosing to complete a joint major, joint honours, double major, two extended minors, an extended minor and a minor, or two minors may satisfy the breadth requirements (designated or not designated) with courses completed in either one or both program areas.

 

Residency Requirements and Transfer Credit

  • At least half of the program's total units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.
  • At least two thirds of the program's total upper division units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.

Elective Courses

In addition to the courses listed above, students should consult an academic advisor to plan the remaining required elective courses.