Please note:

To view the Summer 2020 Academic Calendar go to www.sfu.ca/students/calendar/2020/summer.html

Graduate General Regulations

1.1 Degrees Offered

Listed under each faculty.

1.2 Administration of Graduate Studies

Dean and Associate Provost, Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies

The dean is responsible for the general supervision of graduate work at the University and chairs the senate graduate studies committee.

Associate Director, Graduate Admissions, Records and Registration

The associate director is responsible for enrollment of students, assessment of fees, maintenance of records, and other administrative duties.

Committees

The committees responsible for the supervision of graduate students are the supervisory committee, graduate program committee, the faculty graduate studies committee and the senate graduate studies committee. The functions of these committees in relation to individual students are as follows.

Supervisory Committee (see 1.6.4)

The student’s supervisory committee helps the student define and develop a program of studies and reports on the student’s progress to the graduate program committee. The supervisory committee forms part of the student’s final examination committee.

Examining Committee (see 1.9)

The purpose of the examining committee is to ensure that the student receives a fair and rigorous examination and that the University's policies and requirements are met. Examining committees for students completing program requirements as per GGR 1.7.2a and GGR 1.7.2b include a chair, a supervisory committee and an examiner. Doctoral examining committees include the above with the addition of an external examiner. Examining committees for students completing program requirements as per 1.7.2c include two readers.

Graduate Program Committee

The graduate program committee is responsible for recommending admission, reviewing the student’s progress and arranging for the supervision and examination of the student. For most graduate programs, the graduate program committee is the departmental graduate studies committee. In the Faculties of Business Administration and Education, the graduate committee is the faculty graduate studies committee.

Faculty Graduate Studies Committee

This committee makes recommendations to the senate graduate studies committee on such matters as awarding of degrees, examining committees for doctoral candidates, changes to established programs and establishment of new programs.

Senate Graduate Studies Committee

This committee has the final authority on admissions and the administration of senate regulations which concern graduate work.

The administrative officers of the University who are responsible for the supervision of graduate students are the associate director, graduate admissions, records, and registration and the dean of graduate studies. They and the chairs of graduate program committees are available to students for consultation.

Graduate Studies Information

A wide range of additional information on graduate studies at Simon Fraser University may be found on the University's website at www.sfu.ca/dean-gradstudies. In addition, most departments offer publications describing their graduate programs. These are available directly from the departments and are usually posted on the department's web sites.

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1.3 Admissions

1.3.1 General

For admission to post baccalaureate programs, refer to the undergraduate section of this Calendar.

A student may seek admission to a graduate certificate, graduate diploma, master’s or doctoral program. A student who is not qualified to enter a specific program may seek admission to the University as a qualifying student under the provisions of paragraph 1.3.8.

Applicants meeting the minimum University requirements for admission are not assured admission into any graduate program. Most graduate programs have admission requirements in addition to the minimum. Furthermore, programs must restrict admission to students whose interests are compatible with available resources and faculty expertise.

Applicants may be admitted to Fall, Spring or Summer term, unless a program requires students to start in a specific term. Applicants may request to defer their admission term for up to a maximum of one year. The program has authority to approve or deny the deferral. If the deferral is approved, the offer of admission may be modified.

1.3.2 Application for Admission

Application is through the online application system.  Completed applications and accompanying materials must be submitted to the department before the deadline specified by the department. Applicants are advised to check with the appropriate department as to the prevailing application procedures and deadlines for the graduate program in which they are interested. Applicants are advised that deadlines for applications for awards and teaching assistantships may be earlier than the deadlines for application to a graduate program.

All decisions on graduate admissions are made by the senate graduate studies committee, on recommendation from graduate program committees. Decisions on admissions shall be final. Final approval of admission for non-degree students or exchange graduate students is by the dean of graduate studies.

Retention of Documents

The documents which students supply to support admission applications will be retained for three terms following the term to which application is made. Then, application forms, transcripts and other materials related to applications will be destroyed. Irreplaceable documents will be returned to the applicant if requested at the time of application. All other documents become the property of the University.

Protection of Privacy

Simon Fraser University gathers and maintains information used for the purposes of admission, enrollment and other fundamental activities related to being a Simon Fraser University community member and to attending a public post-secondary institution in the Province of British Columbia. When submitting an application for admission, all applicants are advised that the information they provide and any other information placed into the student record will be protected and used in compliance with British Columbia's Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (1992).

All British Columbian applicants will be asked to provide their BC personal education numbers (PEN) at the time of application. All others will be assigned a PEN by the British Columbia Ministry of Advanced Education, Training and Technology. Its uses are restricted to research and program evaluation. No identifiable personal information will be released.

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1.3.3 English Language Competence

English is the language of instruction and communication at the University. Accordingly, an applicant whose primary language is not English must demonstrate command of English sufficient to pursue graduate studies in the chosen field.

International applicants will not be required to complete an English-language test if they have completed a degree at an institution where the language of instruction and examination was in English in a country where English is the primary language.

All other international applicants will be required to achieve a minimum score of 7.0 on the International English Language Test System (IELTS Academic, not the general test) with a minimum of 6.5 in each section. The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) may be used as an equivalent test provided a score of 93 or better is achieved with a minimum of 20 in each section (TOEFL-internet based exam), or TOEFL 580 and the Test of Written English (TWE) 5.0 (paper-based). All test scores are valid for a period of two years from the date of the test. Some graduate programs have higher English language proficiency requirements as described in their admission requirements.

An applicant requesting a waiver of the English language proficiency test should do so in writing and submit it with their application: in order to maintain a high academic standard, very few waivers are granted. Therefore, it is recommended that those applicants whose primary language is not English submit an English language proficiency test with their application.

1.3.4 Admission to a Graduate Certificate Program

The minimum University requirements for admission to a graduate certificate program are as follows:

a) a bachelor's degree from Simon Fraser University, or its equivalent from a recognized institution;

b) a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.5/4.33,

or

a grade point average of at least 2.67/4.33 (B-) based on the last 60 units of undergraduate courses;

c) submitted evidence, usually references from qualified referees, of the applicant's ability to undertake advanced studies in the area of interest.

In exceptional circumstances, an applicant may be admitted with lower formal qualifications than in (a) when there is significant experience relevant to the proposed area of study. Applicants being recommended through these exceptional circumstances would normally be admitted conditionally to the University.

Applicants must satisfy any further requirements set by the graduate program committee.

1.3.5 Admission to a Graduate Diploma Program

The minimum University requirements for admission to a graduate diploma program are as follows:

a) a bachelor's degree from Simon Fraser University, or its equivalent from a recognized institution;

b) a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.5/4.33,

or

a grade point average of at least 2.67/4.33 (B-) based on the last 60 units of undergraduate courses;

c) submitted evidence, usually references from qualified referees, of the applicant's ability to undertake advanced work in the area of interest.

In exceptional circumstances, an applicant may be admitted with lower formal qualifications than in (a) when there is significant experience relevant to the proposed area of study. Applicants being recommended through these exceptional circumstances would normally be admitted conditionally to the University.

Applicants must satisfy any further requirements set by the graduate program committee.

1.3.6a Admission to a Master's Program

The minimum University requirements for admission to a master's program are as follows:

a) a bachelor's degree from Simon Fraser University or its equivalent from a recognized institution;

b) a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0/4.33 (B),

or

a grade point average of at least 3.33/4.33 (B+) based on the last 60 units of undergraduate courses. Any graduate work is also considered. Individual graduate programs may set a higher admission grade point average;

c) submitted evidence, usually references from qualified referees, of the applicant's ability to undertake advanced study in the area of interest.

In exceptional circumstances, an applicant may be admitted with lower formal qualifications than in (a) or (b) when there is significant experience relevant to the proposed area of scholarship. Applicants being recommended through these exceptional circumstances would normally be admitted conditionally to the University.

Students must satisfy any further requirements set by the graduate program committee.

1.3.6b Transfer to a Master's Program

A student may transfer from a certificate or diploma to a master's program if the following requirements are met:

a) transfer takes place before the sixth term within a certificate or diploma;

b) CGPA is 3.0 or above or if all courses are graded on Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis, all must be complete with Satisfactory;

c) evidence that the student is capable of undertaking substantial original research;

d) must have completed a minimum of 12 units of course work in the certificate or 75% of the course work required in the diploma.

1.3.6c Admission to an Accelerated Master's

The minimum University requirements for eligibility for an Accelerated Master's are as follows:

a) Enrollment in a Simon Fraser University undergraduate bachelor's program and the completion of 90 undergraduate credits with a minimum CGPA of 3.67/4.33;

b) Submitted evidence from qualified referees of the student's ability to undertake advanced work in the area of interest.

Students must satisfy any additional requirements set by the graduate program committee.

A maximum of 10 graduate course units, used either as electives or upper division required courses at the bachelor's level, can be applied to the requirements for the master's degree.

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1.3.7a Admission to a Doctoral Program

The minimum University requirements for admission to a doctoral program:

a) a master's degree from Simon Fraser University or its equivalent from a recognized institution,

or

a bachelor's degree, with a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.5/4.33, or a grade point average of at least 3.67/4.33 (A-) based on the last 60 units of undergraduate courses. Any graduate work is also considered. Applicants admitted directly from a bachelor's degree must complete at least 50% of the course work units required for the relevant department's master's program if no course work is required as part of the doctoral degree;

and

b) submitted evidence that the applicant is capable of undertaking substantial original research. Normally, such capability will be judged from letters of reference from qualified referees, and the completion of a master's thesis, project or other scholarly study.

Applicants must satisfy any further requirements set by the graduate program committee.

1.3.7b Transfer to a Doctoral Program

A student may transfer from a master's to a doctoral program if the following requirements are met:

a) completion of at least 75% of the course work units required for the relevant department's master's program, with a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.5. All graduate work completed at SFU or its equivalent from a recognized institution,

b) evidence that the student is capable of undertaking substantial original research. Normally, such capability will be judged from letters of reference from qualified referees or other evidence of scholarly study;

c) the request for transfer is submitted after the second term and before the seventh term at SFU.

As per GGR 1.12.1. initial enrollment in the doctoral program will be considered as the initial enrollment as a master's student.

1.3.8 Admission as a Qualifying Student

Qualifying admission may be offered to applicants who are deemed not yet ready to begin their graduate work. The applicant normally will have completed a bachelor's degree but may have a cumulative grade point average well below the University minimum admission requirements, or may have substantial deficiencies in their academic preparation for direct admission to the program. Qualifying students will typically be working to make up deficiencies in their background to begin graduate work in their area of interest. An offer of qualifying admission must be accompanied by a set of expected requirements to be completed within one year. The requirements normally will consist of between 12 and 30 units of specified undergraduate courses and will include the required grade for each course. Applicants who require fewer than 12 units of undergraduate work to demonstrate their academic preparedness, or to provide the necessary background for the particular area of study should be considered for regular admission. A minimum of 12 units is established to ensure that an adequate amount of work is required. The maximum of 30 units ensures that the required work can be completed within one year.

If these requirements are met within the stipulated time frame then the qualifying student will be admitted to the degree program for which the qualifying offer of admission was given. If the student fails to complete the specified courses or to achieve the required grades, either additional courses will be required or admission to the graduate program will be denied.

The minimum University requirements for admission as a qualifying student are as follows.

a) a bachelor's degree, or the equivalent

b) submitted evidence of academic ability, usually in the form of references from qualified referees

1.3.9 Admission with a Conditional Requirement

Conditional admission may be offered to an applicant who does not meet the minimum academic admission requirements but who is deemed to be substantially ready to undertake a graduate program. For example, an applicant who has completed the degree required for admission to the graduate program, but whose academic average is slightly below the minimum required for admission to that program, may be considered for conditional admission. An offer of conditional admission will specify the graduate courses that the applicant must complete and the grades that are expected in order to be granted regular admission. These courses should be completed no later than the end of the second term of enrollment. Graduate courses taken while admitted conditionally may be applied to the student's graduate program requirements.

1.3.10 Admission as a Non-degree Student

Normally, a non-degree student at the graduate level has at least a bachelor's degree, or the equivalent, is admitted in order to complete specified courses, but is not seeking a degree from this University. A non-degree student will not be permitted to enroll in undergraduate courses.

Application is through the graduate program committee in the department in which the student wishes to work; applicants are advised to contact the department before submitting an application (see 1.3.1). Transcripts of previous university work (or proof of obtaining a degree) will be required at the time of application, but letters of reference will not necessarily be required.

No credit will be given towards any degree offered by the University for courses completed as a non-degree student except, under unusual circumstances, on petition to the senate graduate studies committee.

1.3.11 Admission as an Exchange Student

Bona fide graduate students at other universities who wish to complete courses at Simon Fraser University, not leading to a degree at this University, will be admitted to complete specific graduate courses on the recommendation of the chair of the department (or equivalent officer) and the dean of graduate studies at the other university, and with the permission of the appropriate graduate program committee and the dean of graduate studies at Simon Fraser University.

1.3.12 Admission as a Visiting Researcher

Simon Fraser University accepts visiting research students under the terms of the Canadian Graduate Student Research Mobility Agreement. For details, see Visiting Research Students on the Graduate Studies website.

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1.3.13 Application to Complete a Second Master's or Doctoral Degree

Students who have a master's or a doctoral degree (either from Simon Fraser University or another university) can apply to complete a second master's or doctoral degree under the following constraints:

  1. no course work completed for the first degree shall count towards the second.
  2. none of the research done for the first degree shall be used for the second.
  3. none of the enrollment terms for the first degree shall count towards the enrollment terms for the second degree.

1.3.14 Application to Complete a Non-joint Concurrent Graduate Degree

Students who are currently enrolled in a master's or doctoral degree at Simon Fraser University can apply to complete a second master's or doctoral degree concurrently under the following constraints:

a) no course work completed as part of the first degree shall count towards the second degree;

b) none of the research done in the first degree shall be used in the second degree;

c) none of the enrollment terms for the first degree shall count towards enrollment terms in the second degree;

d) to apply to and enroll in a second graduate non-joint degree program concurrently, approval of the original program of enrollment must be obtained and the program being applied to must be informed prior to admission that the student is already enrolled in another degree program at SFU;

e) the GGR's related to maximum duration for degree completion continue to apply and no extensions will be given due to being enrolled in more than one program;

f) annual progress reviews must be completed for each program;

g) all university regulations apply independently for each program including the application of tuition fees (i.e. fees will be charged for tuition for each program but ancillary fees will only be charged for each term of enrollment);

h) a student may choose to apply for a personal leave from one of the programs while completing requirements for the other program (see 1.4.5). (Please note that personal leave terms still count towards the maximum time limit for degree completion);

i) student financial support may be provided by either department following consultation between the two units.

1.3.15 Cohort Special Arrangements

Cohort-based special arrangements programs are designed to meet the educational needs of specific student groups in fulfilling the requirements for a graduate credential (certificate, diploma or master's degree) where these needs cannot be met within existing programs. Each program will be comprised of a curriculum and a set of program requirements recommended by each program's graduate program committee, approved by the faculty graduate studies committee and by the senate graduate studies committee. Students may undertake this program only through specific admission to the cohort program. Admission criteria, credential requirements and any other special conditions for a particular cohort special arrangements program must be approved in advance by the senate graduate studies committee; these may not be below the minimum admission and graduate credential requirements of regular graduate programs. In some instances, tuition fees may differ from other programs in the same academic unit, please consult the Graduate Tuition Fees in the Calendar.

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1.4 Enrollment

1.4.1 Continuity of Enrollment

Students are required to enroll every term (Fall, Spring and Summer) unless they have been granted a leave of absence from their program (see 1.4.5). Enrollment only in an audit course or a course outside program requirements does not satisfy the requirement for continuity of enrollment. When a student does not enroll and is not on an approved leave of absence, the student is discontinued from their program. Graduate students who are discontinued do not retain their award or scholarship.

1.4.2 Enrollment

Enrollment begins two months before the start of each term and should be completed by the Friday preceding the start of classes; Students are allowed an additional two weeks to finalize their enrollment. Enrollment for courses completed outside the student's academic unit must have the approval of the course instructor, chair of the graduate program committee and supervisor.

A student may request to take a course outside their program requirements for general interest. They must obtain permission from the chair of the graduate program committee and supervisor. Students will be charged additional tuition based on the course taken.

1.4.3 Enrollment Status

Programs are divided into two different types: 'per term fee' or 'per unit fee'.

Students in 'per term fee' programs are charged a standard fee for each term of enrollment. Enrollment in any course for credit will constitute being a full-time student at the University.

Students in 'per unit fee' programs are charged a fee for each unit enrolled for the term. Enrollment in 6 or more units for credit per term will constitute being a full-time student at the University.

1.4.4 Withdrawal from Courses

Students may withdraw from a course up to the end of the ninth week in any term. Students withdrawing between the fourth and ninth week will receive a WD notation for the course on their transcript.

Under extenuating circumstances, a student may apply to withdraw from a course after the ninth week. Such circumstances must be beyond the control of the student.

1.4.5 Leave of Absence

From time to time, students find it necessary to interrupt their studies. In this case, they must apply for a leave of absence. Typically, a leave of absence begins on the first day of an academic term and approval for the leave is obtained before the term begins. Students in their first term should apply for an admission deferral rather than a leave of absence. A retroactive request for a leave of absence normally will not be allowed.

During a leave of absence students normally should not use any of the University's facilities or resources, or undertake academic or research work related to the program from which they have taken a leave of absence.

Awards for which the terms and conditions are established by SFU will be interrupted at the onset of the leave of absence and will resume at the termination of the leave period, provided the student returns to full-time study at that time. The duration of the award will not be changed from the time the award was initiated. Awards for which the terms and conditions are not established by SFU will be paid according to the terms and conditions established by the donor or granting agency.

There are four types of leave:

  1. Personal Leave
  2. Parental Leave
  3. Medical or Compassionate Leave
  4. Academic Break

The time taken for a personal leave will be counted towards the maximum time allowed for program completion.

The time taken for an academic break, parental, medical, compassionate leave will not be counted towards the maximum time allowed for program completion. The maximum time limit will be adjusted accordingly but all other program requirements and academic unit expectations will remain the same.

Personal Leave

A personal leave may be taken for any reason, other than those defined below. The maximum number of terms that are permitted for a personal leave is three throughout the length of the student's credential.

Parental Leave

A student may take up to three terms for each childbirth or adoption (including multiple births). Students are required to submit supporting documentation.

Medical or Compassionate Leave

A student may take up to three terms per personal medical condition or compassionate reason (including but not limited to legal matter, family care, illness of relative, or bereavement). Students are required to submit supporting documentation.

In some cases, a student may be asked to provide documentation from their clinician to confirm that they have recovered sufficiently to return to their course of study. If medical documentation is submitted for reasons related to a physical or mental disability, the student has a legal entitlement to disability accommodation.

If a student will require more than three terms for a medical condition, it is recommended that students discuss with their supervisor/faculty advisor whether it is in their best interest to temporarily discontinue their program and then apply for readmission when their circumstances have been resolved.

Students completing the requirements for their program past the normal completion time, as the result of having taken three or more medical leaves, may be required to repeat courses/comprehensive examinations or complete additional courses at the discretion of their graduate program committee. Responsibility for approving these additional degree requirements rests with the dean of graduate studies and the chair of the student's graduate program committee.

Academic Break

An academic break (or scheduled break) can be taken when no courses are offered for a student's program within a particular term, or there is a scheduled break within a program (e.g. Summer term). Students in a thesis program are not eligible for an academic break. The maximum number of terms that are permitted for an academic break is one term per year with no consecutive academic breaks.

1.4.6 Course Audit

Students may audit graduate courses, with permission of the instructor, supervisor and graduate program chair of the student's academic unit.

Prior to enrollment, the student and instructor must agree on the requirements for auditing the class. These requirements must include regular attendance at class meetings, completion of readings and participation in class activities. Such audits are recorded as AU on the student's transcript. If a student does not meet the requirements agreed upon the student will receive an AN. The AN will not count towards the student's CGPA.

Audited courses will not count toward degree requirements.

A student may change enrollment status in a course from audit to regular enrollment, or from regular enrollment to audit until the end of week two of the term. Normally, no further change in enrollment status will be permitted after that date.

1.4.7 Practical Experience

Co-operative Education, Internships and Practicums integrate work experience related to the student's major interests within the graduate program. During a work term students must be enrolled in the relevant course. In both Co-operative Education and Internships students receive a salary for their work.

Enrollment in Co-operative Education, Internship or Practicum is subject to supervisory approval and does count towards the student's time limit.

Additional requirements may be required.

Co-operative education is facilitated through Work Integrated Learning.

1.4.8 Reactivation

Students who are not enrolled or on leave (see 1.4.5) by the end of the 6th week of classes within a term, will be discontinued from their program. Students who have not reached the time limit for their program and are discontinued from their program, may apply for reactivation in the same term in which they were discontinued and be retroactively enrolled. Applications for reactivation are submitted to the relevant graduate program committee for consideration and approval by the graduate program chair.

1.4.9 Readmission

Students who have passed the deadline for reactivation, and are within the time limit for their program plus three terms of possible extension time, can apply for readmission through the regular admission process for new students. When a student is discontinued from their program, the time away continues to count towards the time limit and possible extension time for program completion. Students who are readmitted to their program maintain the same start date and time limit from when they were first admitted to the program.

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1.5 Graduate Grading Systems and Policies

The cumulative grade point average (CGPA) is the cumulative average of the grade points earned in the Simon Fraser University graduate courses completed towards a credential. Each letter grade is assigned a numerical equivalent, which is then multiplied by the unit value assigned to the course to produce the grade point. Grades without a numerical equivalent are not included in the calculation of the grade point average.

Term grade point average (GPA) is computed by dividing the total grade points earned by the total units completed in the term to the second decimal place.

1.5.1 Standard Grading Basis

A+ = 4.33 point

A = 4.00 points

A- = 3.67 points

B+ = 3.33 points

B = 3.00 points

B- = 2.67 points

C+ = 2.33 points  

C = 2.00 points

F = 0 points

N = 0 points

FD = 0 points

N Grades

N (incomplete) is given when a student failed to complete the course work by the end of the term

FD Grades

FD (fail, academic discipline) is given by the chair of the department when a student has committed academic dishonesty (see Policy S10.01 Appendix 3). The grade will remain on a student's transcript until two years following graduation at which time it will convert to F.

1.5.2 Competency Grading Basis

This grading system is based on satisfactory acquisition of defined skills or successful completion of the course learning outcomes. The grade shall be entered on the transcript but is not used in calculating the student's CGPA.

  • In Progress (IP)
  • Complete (CO)
  • Satisfactory (S)
  • Unsatisfactory (U)
  • Unsatisfactory, Academic Discipline (UD)

IP Grades

The designation IP (in progress) will be given when a student will be taking a course over multiple terms. An IP remains on a student's transcript even when they complete the course successfully in a later term. If a student does not complete a course graded on an in progress (IP) or complete (CO) basis, an IP still is given.

CO Grades

The designation CO (complete) will be given when a course is graded on an in progress (IP) or complete (CO) basis is completed.

S Grades

The designation S (satisfactory) will be given when a student successfully completes a course graded on a satisfactory (S) or unsatisfactory (U) basis. If a course is not graded S/U an individual student may request permission to have the grading basis on an S/U basis by applying to the supervisory committee. If that committee concurs, the request will be submitted to the graduate program committee for final approval. None of the student's minimum course work requirement under 1.7.2 may be completed S/U.

U Grades

The designation U (unsatisfactory) will be given when a student does not successfully complete a course graded on a satisfactory (S) or unsatisfactory (U) basis. If a course is not graded S/U, an individual student may request permission to have the grading basis on an S/U basis by applying to the supervisory committee. If that committee concurs, the request will be submitted to the graduate program committee for final approval. None of the student's minimum course work requirement under 1.7.2 may be completed S/U.

UD Grades

The designation UD (unsatisfactory, academic discipline) is given by the chair of the department when a student has committed academic dishonesty (see Policy S10.01 Appendix 3). The grade will remain on a student's transcript until two years following graduation at which time it will convert to U.

1.5.3 Notations

Notations are placed on a student's record to indicate a status or standing and provide additional information to the student and the University. Notations do not impact a student's grade point average.

AE

In exceptional circumstances, Aegrotat standing (AE) may be awarded in an incomplete course on medical or compassionate grounds by the registrar acting on the recommendation of the instructor or department chair. Written evidence must substantiate such a request, given that the course requirements have been substantially fulfilled. This evidence normally must be received by the registrar or department within 96 hours of a scheduled final exam or within 96 hours of the last day of term lectures for which such standing is requested.

AU

AU notation is recorded when a student has approval from the department not to complete the course for credit.

AN

AN notation is recorded when a student has audited a course but does not meet the requirements agreed upon.

DE

DE is a temporary grade. Where circumstances warrant an extension to allow a student additional time to complete the course requirements the course instructor may defer the grade, in which case, a grade of DE shall be entered. All course work for such deferrals must be completed, and the course grade must be submitted, by the last day of the first month of the next term. Students granted a DE grade are responsible for making satisfactory arrangements with their instructors for completion of outstanding course requirements. If the grade is not received by the deadline, the DE grade will be converted to an N.

In the case of illness or other extenuating circumstances, a deferral (DE) may be extended. The course instructor and the graduate chair must approve the extension. The maximum extension allowed is the end of the term following the term in which the course was taken. No further extensions will be granted. If a student is unable to complete the course work by the end of the extension period due to extenuating circumstances, a request for a course withdrawal under extenuating circumstances(WE) should be applied for. If a final grade has not been submitted or the withdrawal from the course under extenuating circumstances has not been approved by the end of the term following the term in which the course was initially taken, the DE will be converted to an N.

GN

The notation GN (grade not reported) may be used if circumstances beyond the control of the University make it impossible for grades to be assigned for a course.

WD

A course that is dropped within the fourth to ninth weeks (inclusive) will be recorded on the transcript with the notation WD.

WE

No course may be dropped after the end of the ninth week and before the end of the term, except in extenuating circumstances approved by the associate director, graduate admissions, records and registration or designate. Courses dropped under extenuating circumstances will receive a WE notation. See Academic Dates for dates that apply each term. WD and WE grades carry no credit value and are not used in GPA calculations.

1.5.4 CGPA Required For Continuation and Graduation

A student in a certificate or diploma program must maintain a CGPA of 2.5. Under no circumstances will a student with a CGPA below 2.5 be awarded a graduate diploma or graduate certificate.

A student in a master's or doctoral program must maintain a CGPA of 3.0. Under no circumstances will a student, whose CGPA is below 3.0, be awarded a graduate degree.

Failure to meet the minimum CGPA is evidence of unsatisfactory progress and the matter will be considered by the graduate program committee as required under the Procedure for the Review of Unsatisfactory Progress in 1.8.2.

1.5.5 Graduate Students Retaking a Course

A graduate student may apply to the graduate program committee to retake a course to improve a grade. At most two courses may be repeated with no course being repeated more than once.

The grades for each instance of a retaken course are recorded on the student's transcript with notation that the course was retaken to improve the grade. The better grade is used in calculating the CGPA. Units for a retaken course are counted only once toward the total units required for the degree.

1.5.6 Student's Record after Awarding Degree

When Senate awards a graduate student's credential, the student record is normally considered closed for purposes of grade changes, degree standing and all changes to transcripts and parchments. The exceptions to this would be when there is an appeal pending that had been started prior to the awarding of the credential, or an administrative error on the part of the University or when an FD was assigned.

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1.6 Supervision

1.6.1 General

When a graduate student has been admitted, the graduate program committee will exercise general supervision and provide academic advice for the student through the chair of the graduate program committee or a faculty member designated by the chair, until a supervisor has been appointed, normally no later than the student's second term if appropriate.

1.6.2 Supervision of a Qualifying Student

A qualifying student comes under the general supervision of the graduate program committee, exercised through the chair of that committee or a faculty member designated by the chair.

1.6.3 Supervisor

For degrees that culminate in a thesis or a project examined as a thesis, the supervisor must be a continuing Simon Fraser University faculty member at the rank of assistant professor or above including professor emeriti. Associate members may serve as the supervisor in their affiliated academic units at the discretion of the academic unit's graduate program committee. Where a co-supervision arrangement is created, the co-supervisors jointly act as a supervisor as per 1.6.5.

For degrees that culminate in a project examined by two readers, extended essay, field or comprehensive examination, the supervisor must be a Simon Fraser University faculty member deemed to be qualified by the academic unit's graduate studies committee and approved by the dean of graduate studies.

The appointment of a supervisor should occur as soon as possible after the student’s admission to the graduate program, but normally no later than the student’s second term.

An interim supervisor may be permitted as needed. A supervisor who will be unable to perform their regular duties for more than three months is required to arrange for proper supervision of the student by another supervisor, co-supervisor or committee member during this absence. The graduate program committee and the dean of graduate studies shall be informed in writing of the arrangement.

A supervisor is not required for students in a graduate diploma or certificate program. The director of a diploma or certificate program is responsible for roles normally assigned to the supervisor.

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1.6.4 Supervisory Committee

The supervisory committee mentors and helps the student develop a program of study leading to a degree. The committee reports to the graduate program committee at least once a year on the student's progress. The supervisory committee shall be available to the student for consultation on a regular basis.

A supervisory committee is not required for students in a graduate certificate, diploma or in master's degree programs with program requirements as per 1.7.2d.

For master's degree programs with program requirements as per 1.7.2c the supervisor alone may comprise the supervisory committee.

In master's degree programs with program requirements as per 1.7.2a and 1.7.2b and any doctoral program, a supervisory committee must be established. The minimum composition for the supervisory committee consists of the supervisor (or co-supervisors) and at least one committee member chosen in consultation with the student. The committee member must be a faculty member, adjunct professor or research associate at Simon Fraser University. A suitably qualified individual may be eligible to serve as an additional committee member.

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1.6.5 Co-supervision

A co-supervision arrangement may be created when two individuals exercise the degree of supervision and support of a supervisor. When a co-supervision arrangement is created, all documentation must be approved by both co-supervisors.

Appointment as co-supervisor recognizes a significant contribution of time, expertise or financial resources. The supervision of the student remains a joint responsibility of the co-supervisors.

Adjunct faculty member, practitioner faculty, lecturers, visiting faculty, limited-term research faculty, and an off-campus professional who is academically qualified to advise graduate students all may serve in the capacity of a co-supervisor.

One of the co-supervisors must be a continuing Simon Fraser University faculty member, at the rank of assistant professor or above, or professor emeriti. Departments and faculties are responsible for setting criteria and standards appropriate to their disciplines.

Co-supervisory status may be terminated by the dean of graduate studies if one or both of the co-supervisors are unable to fulfill their responsibilities in compliance with Simon Fraser University policies and procedures relevant to graduate supervision.

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1.6.6 Change in the Supervisory Committee

Continuity of supervision is important in all graduate work. As a consequence, a change in supervisory committee, especially a change in supervisor, may be made only on the basis of strong reasons.

A request for a change in the supervisory committee may come from the student or any member of the supervisory committee. It shall be sent to the graduate program committee accompanied by the reasons, in writing, for the proposed change. If the graduate program committee concurs in the request, it shall be sent to the dean of graduate studies for final approval.

1.6.7 Human Subjects Ethics Review

All research plans involving human subjects must receive ethics approval. Copies of the policy (R20.01), procedures and forms for this review may be obtained from the Office of Research Ethics (http://www.sfu.ca/ore.html) or from the University web site (www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/research.html.)

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1.7 Program Requirements

The minimum University requirements are outlined in GGRs 1.7.1-1.7.6. A graduate program committee may require additional graduate or undergraduate work, either on an individual basis or, with Senate ratification, for all students in the program. One half of the minimum course work required for a credential must be completed at this University.

See 1.7.7 for regulations concerning courses completed at other institutions.

1.7.1 Minimum Program Requirements for the Graduate Certificate and Diploma

Certificate students must complete a minimum of four graduate courses (maximum five courses) for a minimum of 12 units of graduate course work.

Diploma students must complete a minimum of 22 units of graduate course work.

1.7.2 Minimum Program Requirements for the Master’s Degree

Master’s students must complete a minimum requirement of 30 graduate units, in one of the following ways:

    a) Successfully complete a minimum of 12 units of graduate course work plus a thesis that is examined as per 1.9.1.

    b) Successfully complete a minimum of 20 units of graduate course work plus a project that is examined as per 1.9.1.

    c) Successfully complete a minimum of 24 units of graduate course work plus two extended essays, or a project, that are examined by two readers.

    d) Successfully complete a minimum of 30 units of graduate course work. A capstone (e.g. project, examination, portfolio, extended essay) is not required but may be added to the program.

Not all of these options are available for every program.

1.7.3 Minimum Program Requirements for the Doctoral Degree

There are no University course requirements for the doctoral degree. However, a student's supervisory committee, graduate program committee or the faculty graduate studies committee, may require a student to complete specified courses or units as part of the degree program. All doctoral programs require a doctoral thesis based on substantial original research.

1.7.4 Minimum Program Requirements for the Cotutelle Degree

A cotutelle is a single doctoral degree awarded jointly by two institutions. Each cotutelle has an individualized agreement between the student, supervisors, and both institutions.

Cotutelle students must complete at least half of their course work requirements at this University. Cotutelle students have a minimum residency requirement of four terms of full-time enrollment at Simon Fraser University.

1.7.5 Minimum Program Requirements for the Joint Degree

A joint degree is a single credential awarded by two academic units or institutions. The minimum University requirements for the credential apply. The course work is normally divided equally between the academic units or institutions.

1.7.6 Minimum Program Requirements for the Dual Degree

A dual degree program is a degree where two distinct credentials are awarded jointly by two academic units or institutions. Student must complete all university requirements for each credential separately. Courses from one credential cannot be counted toward the completion of the other credential.

1.7.7a Transfer Credit

A student may apply to receive transfer credit towards the requirements at Simon Fraser University if they are planning to take courses at another institution.

To receive transfer credit, the following conditions apply:

a) Application shall be made at least one month before the course/courses start and shall be reviewed by the graduate program committee and be sent to the dean of graduate studies for final approval.

b) The student shall maintain enrollment, not on leave, at Simon Fraser University while completing the course(s) at another university under these provisions.

c) The minimum grade required is a B, although the grade achieved will not be included in the calculation of the cumulative grade point average.

1.7.7b Advance Credit

If a student completed graduate courses prior to being admitted at Simon Fraser University, they may apply to receive advance credit.

To receive advance credit, the following conditions apply:

a) The courses must not have been applied toward the requirements for a previously completed credential, unless this is permitted in the Senate approved program requirements.

b) The courses must have been completed within three years of starting the Simon Fraser University program.

c) The minimum grade required is a B, although the grade achieved will not be included in the calculation of the cumulative grade point average.

d) Application for advance credit must be approved by the graduate program committee and the dean of graduate studies, either before admission or within the first year of enrollment.

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1.8 Progress and Withdrawal

1.8.1 Progress Evaluation

For master’s and doctoral students, the supervisory committee shall report on the student’s progress at least once each year. This report will be sent, in writing, to the graduate program committee with a copy to the student. The evaluation of student progress in course work will rely in part on their maintenance of a CGPA of 3.0, as required by graduate regulation 1.5.4.

For graduate diploma and certificate students, a progress review will be initiated if the CGPA drops below 2.5.

1.8.2 Review of Unsatisfactory Progress

If unsatisfactory progress is identified by the supervisory committee, the supervisory committee shall make a written report to the graduate program committee, and provide a copy to the student. The student concerned has the right to appear before the graduate program committee when the case is considered and is permitted to bring a support person. The student may submit any materials relevant to the case. The decision of the graduate program committee must be one of three options:

  1. If the student's progress is assessed satisfactory despite the supervisory committee's report, inform the student of satisfactory progress with a letter, and meet with the supervisory committee to review the areas of concern. This option is unavailable if the student's CGPA is below the University minimum.
  2. If the student's progress is assessed unsatisfactory, and/or if the student's CGPA is below the University minimum, inform the student with a letter that includes a remediation plan to attain University minima within three terms.
  3. If the student's progress is assessed unsatisfactory, inform the student with a letter that requires the student to withdraw from the University.

Letters documenting any outcomes must be copied to the dean of graduate studies and the associate director, graduate admissions, records and registration.

In the event there are allegations of academic dishonesty, falsified documents, or misconduct, the graduate program committee may not withdraw a student from their program under this policy. A separate process must be followed as outlined in Policy S10 (Academic Honesty and Student Conduct).

Any decision of the graduate program committee may be appealed to the appeals subcommittee of the senate graduate studies committee, by submission of an appeal to the dean of graduate studies. The decision of the appeals subcommittee shall be final.

1.8.3 Withdrawal from Courses and from the University

Permission of the supervisor and the chair of the graduate program committee is required to withdraw from a course. If the supervisor is not yet appointed, or if the student is in a graduate diploma or certificate program, permission of the chair of the graduate program committee is required. If such permission is granted, a student may withdraw from a course without academic penalty up to the end of the ninth week of classes in any term.

Under extenuating circumstances, a student may withdraw from a course without academic penalty during the tenth to the 12th week of classes. Such circumstances must be beyond the control of the student (e.g., medical or financial crisis); under such circumstances, therefore, 898 (Master’s Thesis Research), 899 (PhD Research) or a similar course may be added, as appropriate. Permission of the supervisor and the chair of the graduate program committee is required.

A student may withdraw from the University at any time by notifying the chair of the graduate program committee and the associate director, graduate admissions, records and registration.

A student who has withdrawn from the University and who wishes to re-enter shall apply for readmission under the same conditions as any other applicant.

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1.9 Preparation for Examinations

Master’s Students

1.9.1 Examining Committee for a Master’s Degree Candidate

Each candidate for a master’s degree under 1.7.2a, 1.7.2b, or 1.7.2c will have an examination.

The examining committee for examinations under 1.7.2a and 1.7.2b shall have the following minimum composition:

    a) the chair of the student’s graduate program committee, or designate, who shall be a non-voting chair of the examining committee. If the chair of the graduate program committee is also on the student’s supervisory committee, the chair shall designate a member of faculty at this University, who is not a member of the student’s supervisory committee, as chair.

    b) all members of the student’s supervisory committee.

    c) an examiner who is a member of faculty, or a person suitably qualified, who is not a member of the student's supervisory committee. For a thesis examination in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, normally the examiner may not be a member of the student's department, unless a waiver is granted by the dean of arts and social sciences or designate.

Examination of projects (under GGR 1.7.2b program requirements) may have a different examination process if it has been designated by the appropriate faculty graduate studies committee with the approval of the dean of graduate studies. When the project is live, taped or filmed, only one presentation is required for examination, and a digital copy is required for deposition in the library.

All examinations under 1.7.2a and b shall follow publication and copyright outlined in GGR 1.11.

For students’ completing under 1.7.2c the examination is examined by two readers, designated by the appropriate faculty graduate studies committee with the approval of the dean of graduate studies or designate. Examinations under 1.7.2c may be required to be submitted to the library. If mandatory, this requirement will be listed on the program requirements in the Calendar and shall follow publication and copyright outlined in GGR 1.11.

1.9.2 Preparation for Examination of Master’s Thesis

Preparation for the examination of a master’s thesis shall not take place until the thesis is substantially complete and in the required format. See the Thesis Assistance website for information.

The candidate’s supervisory committee shall make a recommendation to the chair of the graduate program committee concerning the date, place and time of the thesis examination and the composition of the examining committee in conformity with 1.9.1.

Upon approval of the chair of the graduate program committee, this recommendation, with the thesis title, shall be sent to the associate director, graduate admission, records and registration for entry into the University's records. The examining committee composition shall reach the associate director at least four weeks before the examination date. At this time, the chair of the graduate program committee will notify the University community of the intended time and place of the examination.

At least two weeks before the date of the thesis examination, a digital copy of the completed thesis shall be distributed to the examining committee by the chair of the graduate program committee. Department rules may require earlier submission of the completed thesis.

If the date or place has been changed, the chair of the graduate program committee will notify the University community.

The examination of the thesis shall take place under the regulations for thesis examination given in 1.10.1.

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Doctoral Students

1.9.3 Examining Committee for Doctoral Thesis

Each candidate for a doctoral degree shall be examined on the thesis. Each examining committee shall have the following minimum composition:

    a) the chair of the graduate program committee, or designate, who shall be a non-voting chair of the examining committee. If the chair of the graduate program committee is also on the student’s supervisory committee, the chair shall designate a member of faculty at the University, who is not a member of the student’s supervisory committee, as chair.

    b) all members of the student’s supervisory committee

    c) an examiner who is a member of faculty, or a person suitably qualified, who is not a member of the student's supervisory committee. For a thesis examination in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, normally the examiner may not be a member of the student’s department, unless a waiver is granted by the dean of arts and social sciences or designate.

    d) an external examiner who shall be specifically qualified in the field of the thesis and not be a member of faculty at the University

1.9.4 The Role of the External Examiner

The external examiner should be a distinguished scholar with particular research and supervisory experience in the field of the thesis research. The examiner shall be free from potential conflict of interest. The external examiner may participate in person, video/telephone conference or in absentia.

The external examiner shall be asked to report on the thesis. This report will normally be submitted two weeks before the examination date to the dean of graduate studies or designate. In the event the external examiner is examining in absentia, the report should be extensive and give a recommendation for the examination outcome (see 1.10.2). The report may contain specific questions the external examiner would like posed to the candidate. Those questions shall be directed to the candidate during the examination by the chair of the examining committee or members of the examining committee selected by the chair.

If the report states that the thesis is ready for examination, a copy shall be sent to the chair of the graduate program committee for distribution to all members of the examining committee before the examination. The contents of the report will not be communicated to the student until after the defence with permission of the examiner.

If the report recommends that the examination be postponed, the dean or designate shall send a copy to the supervisor and the chair of the graduate program committee. The chair of the graduate program committee and the supervisor will inform the student of the content of the report. The chair of the graduate program committee shall report to the dean or designate whether the examination will take place as scheduled or be postponed.

1.9.5 Preparation for Examination of Doctoral Thesis

Preparation for the examination of a doctoral thesis shall not take place until the thesis is substantially complete and in the required format. See the Thesis Assistance website for information.

The candidate's supervisory committee shall make a recommendation to the chair of the graduate program committee concerning the composition of the examining committee (in conformity with 1.9.3) and the date, location, and time of the thesis examination. Upon approval of the chair of the graduate program committee, this recommendation, along with the thesis and all relevant documentation, shall be sent to the dean of graduate studies or designate for final approval no later than six weeks before the examination date.

Once approved, the dean of graduate studies or designate shall formally invite the external examiner and distribute digital copies of the completed thesis to the examining committee.

The examination of the thesis shall take place under the regulations for thesis examination given in 1.10.1.

1.9.6 Notification of Doctoral Thesis Examination

Once the examination has been approved by the dean of graduate studies or designate, the chair of the graduate program committee or designate is responsible for notifying the candidate, examining committee, faculty dean(s), and the University community of the approved date, location, and time of the thesis examination. This notification should happen no later than two weeks before the examination date.

Any changes to the date, location, and/or time of the thesis examination must be approved by the dean of graduate studies or designate. The chair of the graduate program committee or designate is responsible for informing the candidate, examining committee, faculty dean(s), and the University community. The dean of graduate studies or designate is responsible for notifying the external examiner of any changes.

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1.10 Examinations

1.10.1 Thesis Examination

The candidate shall give an oral account of the research on which the thesis is based and defend the thesis itself. The candidate must be prepared to answer questions on the field of the research and related fields.

Thesis examinations are open to the University community. Copies of the thesis abstract shall be made available to all those attending the examination. The chair of the examining committee shall allow proper opportunity for questions on the thesis to come from persons who are not members of the examining committee but are attending the examination. The dean of graduate studies or designate shall have the right to attend all phases of the examination.

After the chair of the examining committee is satisfied that all relevant questions have been answered, the examining committee shall meet in camera to classify the thesis.

1.10.2 Classification of the Thesis

There are four possible levels of classification of thesis examination.

1. the thesis may be passed as submitted

2. the thesis may be passed on the condition that revisions be completed to the satisfaction of the supervisor

3. the examining committee may defer making judgment if it judges that the thesis could pass after additional work by the candidate. The examining committee for the re-examination must remain the same, must set an end date for completion and may not defer judgment a second time. The examining committee may

a) reach its decision by individual examination of the revised thesis or

b) formal re-examination under section 1.10.1. The preparation for the re-examination does not follow 1.9.5. A date and time for the re-examination is set by the examination committee and may not be postponed once set. The revised thesis is distributed to the examining committee including the external examiner by the chair of the graduate program committee or designate. No pre-defence report will be required from the external examiner. If the revised thesis is failed, follow the steps for the category 4 outcome (see below).

4. the thesis may be failed. In this case, the candidate has to receive a written report from the examining committee. The student will then be required to withdraw from the University.

The decision of the examining committee is by simple majority vote. However, in the cases of doctoral students or students enrolled in Individualized Interdisciplinary Studies master's program, the classification may not be at a higher level than that recommended by the external examiner. A decision to pass the thesis or to defer making judgment may not be reached on a tie vote of the examining committee. If at first a majority vote to pass the thesis cannot be reached, and subsequently, if a majority vote to defer judgment cannot be reached, the thesis will be failed.

Upon a successful completion, the thesis must be submitted to the library no later than the end of the subsequent term.

1.10.3 Recommendation for the Award of the Degree

When a student’s program requirements include an examination as per 1.9.1 the recommendation for the award of degree will not take place until after the supervisory committee has approved any revisions to the thesis or project.

When a student has successfully completed the degree requirements the recommendation for the award of the degrees goes for approval respectively to the graduate program committee, the faculty graduate studies committee, the senate graduate studies committee and senate, which has the final authority to award the degree.

The title of the thesis, extended essays, paper or project will be recorded on the student’s transcript.

1.10.4 Submission to the Library

Theses and projects under GGR 1.7.2a and 1.7.2b are required to be submitted to the Library no later than the end of the subsequent term after their successful examination. Projects completed under GGR 1.7.2c and capstones required to be submitted to the Library will follow the requirements for a thesis below.

A digital copy of the final completed thesis shall be sent to the Library together with a memorandum from the supervisor certifying that all required revisions have been made. Once submitted, the thesis is considered final and normally may not be changed. The Library's Assistant for Theses will review thesis formatting and upon approval the thesis will be deposited into the Library's institutional repository.

No degree examined as per 1.7.2a and 1.7.2b will be approved by senate until the thesis is submitted to the Library.

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1.11 Publication of Thesis

When the thesis is submitted to the library, the student shall authorize the copying and publication of the thesis as follows.

1.11.1 Partial Copyright License

Except as noted in 1.11.3, the student shall sign a partial copyright license which grants to the University a non-exclusive worldwide, irrevocable, royalty-free license to reproduce, convert, publish, archive, communicate and distribute the thesis. Multiple copying is not permitted without written permission from the author except that, if the author is unobtainable, the dean of graduate studies may give this permission.

1.11.2 Reproduction

Except as noted in 1.11.3, the student shall sign an agreement form authorizing Library and Archives Canada to reproduce the thesis and to sell microfilm copies on request.

1.11.3 Postponement of Publication

The results of research conducted at Simon Fraser University should be available freely to the public, and it is expected that theses will be placed in the institutional repository immediately following final revisions. It is the responsibility of graduate students to ensure that this policy is communicated clearly to relevant individuals and organizations outside the university prior to the initiation of any research project.

A postponement will delay the inclusion of a thesis in the institutional repository and from copying for a period of 12 months from the date of examination of the thesis, in order to protect confidential commercial information, patentable material, pending application, or where immediate commercial publication is anticipated. A postponement request must be made in writing prior to the submission to the Library. The submission process and timeline remains the same, however, a copy of the thesis or project shall not be made available in the Library institutional repository during the restricted period.

In rare and exceptional circumstances a postponement of publication may be extended for an additional 12 month period. Requests for such extensions should be submitted 60 days prior to the expiration of the current postponement.

1.11.4 Publication of the Thesis by the Student

None of the clauses above preclude the student from publishing the thesis in any form at any time.

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1.12 Time Limit for Program Completion

1.12.1 Time Limit

The time limit for students in a graduate certificate, diploma, or master's program to complete all of the requirements is nine terms from the start of the program. The time limit for students in a doctoral program to complete all of the requirements is 18 terms from the start of the program, or in the case of a student who has transferred from a master's into the doctoral program, without completing the master's, 18 terms from the start of the master's program.

The time limits for program completion are not intended to be the normal times for completion. These limits take into account a wide variety of extraordinary circumstances and events that may delay completion. It is expected that most students will complete their program before reaching the time limit. Individual academic units may specify their expectations of normal program completion times as a guide for determining whether a student's progress is satisfactory.

Some students may find it necessary to interrupt their studies by taking a leave of absence. The time taken for a parental leave, medical/compassionate leave, or academic break will not be counted towards the time limit for program completion. The time for a personal leave will be counted towards the time limit (see 1.4.5).

Students with long-term disabilities should discuss their situation with the Centre for Students with Disabilities early in their graduate studies or as soon as possible after the condition is diagnosed. The Centre will assist the student, and their department, in developing a plan for program completion, which may include an extension beyond the normal time limits. Such plans must be approved by the dean of graduate studies.

1.12.2 Extensions

Students may apply for an extension to the time limit if they are enrolled in a master's or doctoral program and need more time to complete the program requirements. A single extension may be for one to three terms, and students may be granted more than one extension. A master's and doctoral program can be no longer than the time limit plus six terms of extended time. Extensions may be less than the maximum of six terms and must meet the criteria established by the academic unit. Students should contact their academic unit to confirm the specific extension policy for their program.

Applications for an extension must be submitted no later than the term in which the time limit or current extension expires. Extensions are not available to students who are discontinued from their program. Students are required to maintain continuous enrollment throughout their extension and are eligible to go on medical/compassionate or parental leave (see 1.4.5). Extensions are approved by the supervisor, graduate program chair and the dean of graduate studies.

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1.13 Award of the Degree

1.13.1 Application for Graduation

Every candidate for a graduate degree is responsible for applying for graduation online through sis.sfu.ca.

1.13.2 Award of the Degree

Award of the degree is by resolution of senate.

1.13.3 Transcripts

Certified official transcripts of the student’s graduate academic record may be obtained from the Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies. Only individually signed copies with the University seal are valid. For further information on cost refer to Graduate Fees.

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1.14 Convocation Ceremony

Convocation is held twice annually. Graduates from the previous fall and spring terms convocate in early June, while graduates from the summer term convocate in October.

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1.15 Class Interruption

Simon Fraser University makes reasonable efforts to ensure that its classes and courses of instruction proceed on a regular basis and without interruption. Faculty have certain discretion to cancel or change the timetable for their classes; they will endeavor to give reasonable notice of any cancellation or change. Simon Fraser University will not be responsible for cancellation or change of any class. Neither will Simon Fraser University be responsible for the interruption or termination of any class or course of instruction which results from fire, riot, labour disruption or any other event which occurs despite the University’s efforts, or for failure to give notice of the interruption or termination. See policy GP4 for details.

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1.16 Graduate Student Appeals

Graduate students are advised to seek informal resolution of problems through discussions with their supervisor, graduate program chair, department chair or faculty dean, and the dean of graduate studies.

1.16.1 Grades

May be appealed to the instructor, department chair and, in some cases, faculty dean in accordance with academic policy T 20.01.

1.16.2 Progress Evaluations

May be appealed to the senate graduate studies committee (See 1.8.2 Review of Unsatisfactory Progress).

1.16.3 Admission

Applicants who meet or exceed minimum requirements for admission are not assured of admission to any graduate program (see 1.3.1 General)

Normally, admission decisions may not be appealed (see 1.3.2 Application for Admission). In exceptional circumstances, unsuccessful applicants may appeal to the Senate Appeals Board. The Board will only review the fairness of admissions procedures and will not review an applicant’s credentials.

Appeal forms are available at http://students.sfu.ca/forms/.

1.16.4 Other Appeals

Appeals of decisions on enrollment, graduation, entry/re-entry to a program or any matter relating to academic standing (other than review of unsatisfactory progress) are referred to the senate appeals board. Appeal forms are available at http://students.sfu.ca/forms.

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