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Environment | Faculty of Environment Simon Fraser University Calendar | Spring 2020

Environmental Literacy

Certificate

The program addresses the need for undergraduate students from a broad range of disciplines to have a basic understanding of the complexity and interdisciplinarity of environmental issues. It seeks to introduce students to physical, ecological, and social perspectives on the environment, with emphasis on the functioning of physical and ecological systems and how human activities have affected and are affected by such systems over time. Typically, the program will also provide students with knowledge of environmental issues as they pertain to their own field of study.

The program will require students to complete a total of 21 units, comprised of 12 lower division units and a minimum of nine lower and/or upper division units depending upon electives taken. These requirements include three introductory environmental courses (one physical, one ecological and one social science); one course introducing students to the complexity and interdisciplinarity of environmental issues; and a minimum of 9 units of electives chosen from one of the three elective groups.

Earned units may be applied to the student's major or minor programs, and to a bachelor's degree. However, units earned in the certificate cannot be applied to another Simon Fraser University certificate or diploma.

Students in the following environmental specialty programs will be ineligible to receive the certificate:

Program Requirements

Students complete at least 21 units, of which 12 units are required core courses and the remaining nine units are selected from one of the electives groups.

Students are responsible for meeting the prerequisite requirements for courses used toward the certificate.

Core Courses

Students complete a minimum of 21 units, including all of

GEOG 111 - Earth Systems (3)

An introduction to landforms, climates, soils and vegetation; their origins, distributions, interrelationships and roles in the ecosystem. Laboratory work and field trips are included. Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Andrew Perkins
Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SSCB 9201, Burnaby
D101
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5028, Burnaby
D102
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 6101, Burnaby
D103
Tu 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 5051, Burnaby
D104
We 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5028, Burnaby
D105
We 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5028, Burnaby
D106
We 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5038, Burnaby
D107
We 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 6101, Burnaby
D108
Th 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5051, Burnaby
D109
Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 4115, Burnaby
D110
We 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 2104, Burnaby
REM 221 - Systems Thinking and the Environment (3)

Introduces systems thinking in the context of environmental and sustainability challenges using system archetypes and system dynamics theory. Analytical and modeling techniques are applied to understand and project systems complexity. Prerequisite: One of REM 100, or GEOG 100 or 111, or EVSC 100. Students with credit for ENV 221 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

and one of

BISC 204 - Introduction to Ecology (3)

An introduction to biotic-environmental relationships and dynamics; ecological concepts; population dynamics, variation, adaptation and evolution. Prerequisite: BISC 101 and 102 with a grade of C- or better. Students with credit for GEOG 215 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Mikael Mokkonen
Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
Th 9:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 3153, Burnaby
AQ 3153, Burnaby
D101
Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 2503, Burnaby
D102
Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 2532, Burnaby
D104
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 2503, Burnaby
GEOG 215 - Biogeography (3)

An introduction to the planetary biosphere, its living organisms, and their interactions with each other and the Earth system. Prerequisite: GEOG 111.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Andres Varhola
Mo 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SSCC 9000, Burnaby
D101
We 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
D102
We 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
D103
We 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5027, Burnaby
D104
We 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 4115, Burnaby

and one of

GEOG 102 - World Problems in Geographic Perspective (3)

Current world-scale problems are examined in their regional and global contexts, with emphasis being placed on the importance of dynamics of the natural environment in human affairs. Breadth-Social Sciences.

REM 100 - Global Change (3)

This course provides students with an overview of global environmental change and its causes from a social science perspective, historically and at the present time. Population growth, an increasing ecological footprint and changes in ideology, social organization, economy and technology will be critically reviewed. New ways of thinking in natural and social science will be considered in relation to specific issues such as land, soil and food; energy, raw materials and solid waste; air pollution and transportation; water, oceans and fisheries; climate change; forestry and biodiversity; urbanization, and alternative futures. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100 Scott Harrison
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 3182, Burnaby
D101
We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 3255, Burnaby
D102
We 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 3513, Burnaby
D103
Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 3511, Burnaby
D104
Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5035, Burnaby
D105
Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
WMC 3511, Burnaby
D106
Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
WMC 3511, Burnaby
D107
We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5035, Burnaby
D108
We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5035, Burnaby

Elective Groups

Students complete a minimum of 9 units from one of the groups of electives.

Social and Historical (Group A)

ARCH 329 - Special Topics in Environmental Archaeology (3)

Select topics relating to environmental archaeology. Prerequisite: ARCH 201.

ARCH 340 - Zooarchaeology (5)

An introduction to the study of animal remains from archaeological sites. Coverage of the major concepts and methods used in the study of animal remains and detailed practical coverage of the vertebrate skeleton. Prerequisite: ARCH 201.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Christina Giovas
We 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SWH 9084, Burnaby
D101 Christina Giovas
Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SWH 9084, Burnaby
ARCH 365 - Archaeological Perspectives on Human Ecology (3)

Examines methods, theories, and concepts for understanding how past cultures interacted with their bio-physical surroundings. Integrates diverse kinds of data and knowledge to understand these relationships. Topics to be addressed include local and traditional ecological knowledge, paleoenvironmental reconstruction, human-environment interaction, human-induced environmental changes, paleodiet, and domestication. Prerequisite: ARCH 201; or any two of ARCH 100, REM 100, GEOG 100, EVSC 100; and 45 credits.

ARCH 386 - Archaeological Resource Management (3)

Surveys the origins, implementations, and need for archaeological heritage legislation on an international and national scale. Topical issues associated with contract archaeology, public archaeology, native heritage, and avocational societies are incorporated. Prerequisite: ARCH 201.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Bob Muir
Tu 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
SWH 9152, Burnaby
ARCH 390 - Archaeobotany (5)

An introduction to the recovery and analysis of macroscopic archaeological plant remains. The major methodological and interpretive issues in archaeobotany will be covered, with an emphasis on plant domestication in selected regions of the world. Prerequisite: ARCH 201 and either ARCH 272/272W or 273. Students who have taken ARCH 334 or ARCH 335 may not take this course for further credit.

CMNS 349 - Environment, Media and Communication (4)

An examination of how media, culture and communication shape public opinion and behaviour about environmental issues such as global warming, (un)sustainable resource use and pollution, with special attention to the impact of practices such as advertising, public relations, science and risk communication, journalism and advocacy communication upon public discourse about the environment, and the role of dialogue and deliberation in mediating and resolving conflict over environmental issues. Prerequisite: 45 units, including at least one upper division course in CMNS, DIAL, EVSC, GEOG or BlSC.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Shane Gunster
Mo 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
HCC 1800, Vancouver
D101
Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
HCC 1505, Vancouver
D102
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
HCC 1505, Vancouver
D103
Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
HCC 1505, Vancouver
D104
Mo 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
HCC 1505, Vancouver
J100 Darren Fleet
We 5:30 PM – 9:20 PM
HCC 1425, Vancouver
ENV 320W - Ethics and the Environment (3)

An introduction to the field of environmental ethics for non-specialists. Addresses questions such as what obligations we have to future generations and the natural world, as well as the extent of these obligations. Prerequisite: Students must have earned at least 45 units. Students who have taken PHIL 333-3 or ENV 399-3 "Special Topics in Environmental Ethics" prior to or in 2011 and students with credit in PHIL 328-3 may not enroll in this course for further credit. Philosophy Majors and Minors may not take this course for credit towards their major or minor degree. Writing.

FNST 212 - Indigenous Perceptions of Landscape (3)

Indigenous peoples of North America possess perceptions of landscape rooted in their long history with the land. Using methods and theories designed for anthropology, archaeology, land and resource management planning and geography will bring a multi-disciplinary approach to this study of cultural landscapes. Prerequisite: FNST 101 or 201W.

FNST 332 - Ethnobotany of British Columbia First Nations (3)

This course is an introduction to the study of plant knowledge and use by First Nations peoples in British Columbia. It provides students with information about the role of plants in First Nations' cultures including such areas as foods, medicines, technology, ceremony, ecological indicators, and within First Nations' knowledge and classification systems. Special focus may be placed on the ethnobotany of one or more Aboriginal groups or culture areas. Prerequisite: FNST 101. Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Robert Bandringa
Fr 10:30 AM – 1:20 PM
SWH 9095, Burnaby
D200 Robert Bandringa
Fr 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SWH 9095, Burnaby
FNST 403 - Indigenous Knowledge in the Modern World (3)

This course explores the subject of traditional Indigenous knowledge and its contemporary implications for First Nations programs in such areas as economic development, ecotourism, spiritualism, language retention, biodiversity, ethnoscience, environmentalism, and heritage conservation. First Nations perspectives on patents, copyrights, and other creative products from traditional culture will also be examined through lecture, guest speakers and seminar presentation. Prerequisite: FNST 101 or FNST 201W.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Eldon Yellowhorn
We 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SWH 9095, Burnaby
FNST 433 - Indigenous Environmental Justice and Activism (4)

Examines contemporary writings regarding Indigenous environmental logic and environmental concerns of contemporary times. Studies effects of resource extraction upon Indigenous nations, globalization, genetic modifications, health, intellectual property, spiritual beliefs, culture and society, art and language and compares these with specific Indigenous logic at the time of contact. Prerequisite: 45 units.

GEOG 322 - World Resources (4)

An analysis of the use and development of natural resources from a geographic, economic and institutional perspective. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100. Students with credit for GEOG 322W may not take this course for further credit.

GEOG 362 - Geography of Urban Built Environments (4)

Current concepts and approaches in urban geography regarding the development of built environments. Central concerns are the relationships between urbanization and the state, capital, and civil society at various scales. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100. Students with credit for GEOG 362W may not take this course for further credit.

GEOG 377 - Environmental History (4)

Examines the reciprocal influences between humans and nature through time. Topics may include settlement, agriculture, technology, politics, urbanization, science, and conservation. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100 or REM 100. Students with credit for HIST 377 may not take this course for further credit.

GEOG 385 - Food and the City (4)

An exploration of how food is related to cities, giving particular attention to the culture and politics of food production, distribution, and consumption. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100 or REM 100.

GEOG 389W - Nature and Society (4)

Examines the relationship between nature and society, covering the dominant geographical approaches to human-environment interaction, and their social, spatial, and political economic effects. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100 or REM 100. Writing.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Rosemary-Claire Collard
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SSCC 9000, Burnaby
D101
Tu 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
SWH 10075, Burnaby
D102
We 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 2531, Burnaby
D103
We 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 7101, Burnaby
D104
We 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
SWH 10075, Burnaby
HIST 377 - Environmental History (4)

Examines the reciprocal influences between humans and nature through time. Topics may include settlement, agriculture, technology, politics, urbanization, science, and conservation. Prerequisite: 45 units, including six units of lower division history. Students with credit for GEOG 377 may not take this course for further credit.

HSCI 216 - Ecological Determinants of Human Growth, Development and Health (3)

Effects that social and ecological factors have on human growth, development and health. Challenges such as epidemics, natural catastrophes, industrialization, globalization, migration, poverty, war, global warming, etc, leading to evolution and adaptations. Relationships between socio-ecological challenges, their health consequences and related gene-population variations and effects on growth, development, sexual maturation, reproductive investment, and senescence and health. Prerequisite: HSCI 100 or BISC 101.

HSCI 304 - Perspectives on Human Health and the Environment (3)

Environmental risks and their impacts on human health. Chemical and biological hazards. Methodological approaches to their detection, assessment, management, and mitigation. Prerequisite: Two HSCI 200-level courses, one of which may be taken concurrently.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Cecilia Sierra Heredia
Th 8:30 AM – 11:20 AM
EDB 7618, Burnaby
HSCI 403 - Health and the Built Environment (3)

Relationships between the physical environment in which people live and their health and well being. How the built environment affects physical activity, obesity, exposure to pathogens and toxins, health status, mental health, and risk of illness and injury. How urban form, physical infrastructure, and landscape and building design can promote health. Prerequisite: 60 units including HSCI 330. Students with credit for HSCI 309 may not complete this course for credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Meghan Winters
Th 8:30 AM – 11:20 AM
BLU 9920, Burnaby
HUM 325 - The Humanities and the Natural World (4)

A study of the humanistic, scientific, political, and ideological discourses deriving from concern with the natural environment. Using classic and contemporary sources, this course examines the interaction of humans with the non-human world, and includes such topics as human communities and nature, the immersion of the individual in nature, nature and the human habitat. Prerequisite: 45 units. Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Alessandra Capperdoni
Tu 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
HCC 2540, Vancouver
LBST 311 - Labour and the Environment (3)

The changing relationships between unions and environmental groups; how work in various industries contribute to climate change; and how climate-change policies affect workers in different ways. The consequences of climate policies for different categories of workers, identified by economic sector, geographic location, gender, ethnicity, and Aboriginal status. Prerequisite: 30 units. Strongly Recommended: LBST 101.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 John-Henry Harter
Tu 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
BLU 10655, Burnaby
PHIL 328 - Environmental Philosophy (3)

A survey of contemporary issues in environmental ethics. Topics may include: animal rights, the intrinsic value of nature, 'deep ecology', obligations to future generations, conservation, environmental justice, as well as relevant background materials in ethical theory. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 120W (or equivalent), 121, 220, 221 or ENV 320W. Students who have completed PHIL 318 may not take this course for further credit.

PSYC 366 - Psychology and Environmental Sustainability (3)

A survey of some of the ways that psychological theorizing and research, and social psychology in particular, can be applied to environmental sustainability. Introduces students to some of the environmental challenges faced by contemporary humans and the psychological implications of those challenges. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and PSYC 260. Students with credit for PSYC 391 Psychology and Environmental Sustainability may not take PSYC 366 for further credit.

SA 326 - Food, Ecology and Social Thought (S) (4)

Modernization narratives have placed food and agriculture on the margins of social thought. The current ecological crisis requires us to take a new look at the global agrifood system and its social, political and ecological relations. This course develops analytical perspectives on contemporary issues concerning food, ecology and agrarian change. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Yildiz Atasoy
We 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SWH 10061, Burnaby
SA 371 - The Environment and Society (SA) (4)

An examination of environmental issues in their social context. Environmental issues are on the leading edge of contemporary public concern and public policy debates. This course will examine such issues as the relationship between social organization and mode of subsistence, the politics of hunger, and the way in which human societies in their particular social, historical, and cultural contexts view and interact with the natural world. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150 or 201W.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Nicholas Scott
Th 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 4150, Burnaby

Natural Science (Group B)

BISC 309 - Conservation Biology (3)

An examination of the primary threats to biodiversity, how biological processes contribute to the persistence of populations and structure of communities, and species and landscape approaches to conservation in the real world. Prerequisite: BISC 204 with a grade of C- or better. Students who have taken BISC 474 in Spring 2006 or BISC 475 in Spring 2008 as special topics courses titled 'Conservation Ecology' cannot take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Nick Dulvy
Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5037, Burnaby
AQ 5037, Burnaby
D101
Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5050, Burnaby
D102
Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5051, Burnaby
D103
Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5051, Burnaby
BISC 313 - Environmental Toxicology: A Mechanistic Perspective (3)

Students are introduced to general principles of toxicological action, testing, evaluation and assessment. The environmental fate and toxic mechanisms of action of several important classes of environmental pollutants in several organisms (including humans) will be examined at different levels of organization, from the molecular and biochemical to the function of organ systems and behavior. Prerequisite: BISC 101 and one of BISC 204, GEOG 215, or MBB 231; all with a grade of C- or better.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Chris Kennedy
Mo, We, Fr 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 3159, Burnaby
D101
Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 5125, Burnaby
D102
Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 7102, Burnaby
D103
Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB 5125, Burnaby
D104
Fr 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SWH 10075, Burnaby
CHEM 191 - Living in a Materials World: From the Stone Age to Nanoscience (3)

A survey of materials that have been used throughout human history, from stone, bone and wood to modern plastics and superconductors. The chemical principles that give rise to different materials' properties will be examined, with an emphasis of how small changes at the molecular level can have important implications in everyday life. Issues of sustainability and the environmental impact of materials will be discussed. Intended for both science and non-science students. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

CHEM 192 - Chemistry in Your Home, Work, and Environment (3)

The impact of chemistry on modern living. Students will gain a broad perspective on chemical processes with historical, environmental and economic importance in shaping society, examining both the beneficial and harmful aspects of the chemicals that shape our lives. Topics may include: perfumes, explosives, drugs, dyes, plastics, pesticides and greenhouse gases. Intended for both science and non-science students. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

CHEM 317 - Analytical Environmental Chemistry (2)

Principles and applications of the methodologies of analytical chemistry employed in the determination of substances in air, water, and soil, with particular emphasis upon sampling and sample preparation. Prerequisite: CHEM 316 and 371, both with a minimum grade of C-. Corequisite: CHEM 372. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
LA01 Rebecca Goyan
Tu 8:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SSCC 8055, Burnaby
CHEM 371 - Chemistry of the Aqueous Environment (3)

An introduction to chemical processes in the aqueous environment. Quantitative treatment of the variables determining the composition of natural systems. Chemistry of aqueous toxic agents, wastewater treatment, and related matters. Prerequisite: CHEM 281 and CHEM 360, both with a minimum grade of C-. Quantitative.

CHEM 372 - Chemistry of the Atmospheric Environment (3)

Quantitative treatment of chemical and physical processes in the atmospheric environment. Chemistry of the troposphere including air pollution and climate change. Chemistry of the stratosphere including ozone depletion. Environmental radioactivity. Current topics. Prerequisite: CHEM 281 and CHEM 360, both with a minimum grade of C-. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 George Agnes
Mo, We, Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5048, Burnaby
D101 George Agnes
Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5028, Burnaby
EASC 104 - Geohazards - Earth in Turmoil (3)

An introduction to the range of geological hazards that affect the Earth, the environment and humanity. Topics covered will include the hazards and risks related to volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, landslides and avalanches, tsunamis, geomagnetic storms and other potentially cataclysmic events. The forecasting and possible mitigation of these geohazards will also be investigated. Students may not take EASC 104 for credit towards EASC major or minor program requirements. Students with credit for GEOG 312 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Science.

Section Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
EASC 107 - Economic Geological Resources (3)

An overview of Earth's major economic resources. Topics will include geologic processes which produce significant natural resources including metals, hydrocarbons and other energy resources, industrial minerals, and groundwater. Emphasis will be placed on relations between earth sciences and aspects of economics, business, history, politics, and environmental issues. Much of the focus will be on the changing nature of resource exploration and extraction, and how this may evolve in the near to distant future. Students may not use EASC 107 for credit towards Earth Sciences major or minor program requirements. Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
J100 Kevin Cameron
Th 5:30 PM – 8:20 PM
HCC 2540, Vancouver
EASC 209W - Environmental Geoscience (4)

Environmental geology is a branch of Earth science that deals with the relationship of people to their geological habitat. Topics covered will include environmental impact of mineral extraction and logging; erosion and sedimentation in rural and urban environments; and mass movements in mountainous terrain. The course includes two 1-day field trips that usually occur on Saturdays. This course is primarily designed for EASC program students and those pursuing degrees in other Departments and Faculties that require a strong foundational course in Environmental Geoscience. Prerequisite: EASC 101 with a grade of C- or better. Students with credits for EASC 303W may not take this course for credit. Writing.

EASC 304 - Hydrogeology (3)

An introduction to the basic concepts and principles governing the flow of groundwater in the subsurface environment. These are used to develop an understanding of aquifers and their physical properties, groundwater sustainability and management, and interaction of groundwater with surface water. In addition, as a foundation course in fluids in geologic media, this course has relevance to the oil and gas and mining industries, as well as to engineering applications such as dewatering. Prerequisite: EASC 101 and PHYS 102 or 121 or 126 or 141; and 12 additional units in earth sciences, physical geography or environmental science. All with a grade of C- or better. Quantitative.

EASC 314 - Principles of Glaciology (3)

An introduction to the study of ice in the modern environment from a geophysical perspective, with a focus on glaciers and ice sheets. Topics include the physical and chemical properties of ice, glacier mass and energy balance, glacier and ice-sheet hydraulics and dynamics, fast ice flow and the relationship between ice and climate. Prerequisite: 60 units, including MATH 152, PHYS 102 or 121 or 126 or 141, and any 100-level EASC course or permission of the instructor. Recommended: EASC 101. All with a grade of C- or better. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Gwenn Flowers
Mo, We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SWH 10075, Burnaby
D101
Tu 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
TASC1 7006, Burnaby
EVSC 100 - Introduction to Environmental Science (3)

Introduces students to the study of environmental science. Lecture material spans contributing disciplines, emphasizing integration of diverse concepts to understand environmental problems. Tutorials develop core academic skills in environmental science context. Students who have completed EVSC 200 may not complete this course for further credit. Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Marnie Branfireun
Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SRYC 5140, Surrey
D101 Marnie Branfireun
Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SRYC 5060, Surrey
D102 Marnie Branfireun
Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SRYC 5060, Surrey
D103 Marnie Branfireun
Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SRYC 5060, Surrey
D104 Marnie Branfireun
Tu 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SRYC 5060, Surrey
D300 Marnie Branfireun
Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 3181, Burnaby
D301 Marnie Branfireun
Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
RCB 7101, Burnaby
D302 Marnie Branfireun
Th 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 5048, Burnaby
D303 Marnie Branfireun
Fr 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5038, Burnaby
D304 Marnie Branfireun
Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5027, Burnaby
D305 Marnie Branfireun
Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
D306 Marnie Branfireun
Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5050, Burnaby
D307
Th 5:30 PM – 6:30 PM
AQ 5039, Burnaby
GEOG 213 - Introduction to Geomorphology (3)

An examination of landforms, processes, laws, and theories of development; types and distributions. Prerequisite: GEOG 111 or EASC 101. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Jonathan Cripps
Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 2220, Burnaby
D101
Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 2533, Burnaby
D102
Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 3513, Burnaby
GEOG 214 - Weather and Climate (3)

An examination of the basic principles and processes governing the Earth's weather and climate. Topics include: radiation, greenhouse effect, clouds, precipitation, atmospheric circulation, mid-latitude cyclones, tropical storms, climate change. Prerequisite: GEOG 111. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Kirsten Zickfeld
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 2202, Burnaby
D101
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 2111, Burnaby
D102
Tu 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 2111, Burnaby
D103
We 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 2109, Burnaby
GEOG 311 - Hydrology (4)

Introduction to the hydrologic cycle, with an emphasis on the hydrology of British Columbia; description and analysis of the processes of water movement and storage measurements and analysis of hydrologic data. Prerequisite: GEOG 213 or 214; GEOG 251 or one of STAT 201, 203 (formerly 103), 205, or 270. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Jesse Hahm
Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 2202, Burnaby
D101
Mo 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 2111, Burnaby
D102
Tu 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 2109, Burnaby
D103
Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 2109, Burnaby
GEOG 312 - Geography of Natural Hazards (4)

An introduction to the occurrence and origin of natural hazards such as volcanic eruptions, landslides, etc. Interaction between the relevant natural processes and society will be examined, as well as prediction of natural events and the amelioration of the effects of such events within different cultural contexts. Prerequisite: GEOG 111 or EASC 101. Students with credit for GEOG 212 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Andrew Perkins
Fr 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 3003, Burnaby
D102
Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5038, Burnaby
D103
Fr 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5051, Burnaby
D104
Fr 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5051, Burnaby
GEOG 313 - River Geomorphology (4)

Intermediate analysis in fluvial and coastal geomorphology with particular reference to British Columbia. Prerequisite: GEOG 213. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Tracy Brennand
Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5030, Burnaby
D101
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
D102
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 7101, Burnaby
GEOG 314 - The Climate System (4)

A survey of the climate system, with emphasis on the interactions among its components; radiation, energy and water balances; climate sensitivity and feedbacks; natural and anthropogenic climate change; climate models. Prerequisite: GEOG 214. Recommended: MATH 151 and 152 or MATH 154 and 155 or MATH 157 and 158. Quantitative.

GEOG 315 - World Ecosystems (4)

Distribution, structure, function, and dynamics of the world's major biomes. Attention to comparative aspects among terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and to environmental problems associated with the biomes. Prerequisite: GEOG 215 or BISC 204.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Lance Lesack
We, Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 2202, Burnaby
D101
We 3:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5017, Burnaby
D102
Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5038, Burnaby
D103
Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 4125, Burnaby
GEOG 316 - Global Biogeochemical and Water Cycles (4)

Introduction to the cycling of essential chemical elements through ecosystems. Interactions among biological, hydrological, and geological controls on the structure and function of ecosystems and the spatial-temporal scales of elemental cycling are emphasized. Environmental problems resulting from disturbance to natural equilibria in the elemental cycles are examined. Prerequisite: GEOG 215 or BISC 204 or permission of the instructor. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Lance Lesack
We, Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5030, Burnaby
D101
Fr 10:30 AM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5027, Burnaby
D102
Th 8:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5017, Burnaby
GEOG 318 - Soils in Our Environment (4)

A survey of soils and their management. Focuses on the role of soils in the environment; their physical, chemical and biological properties; processes of degradation (including erosion, desertification, pollution, and nutrient depletion); and the maintenance of healthy soils. Prerequisite: Completion of 45 units including GEOG 111. Students who have taken GEOG 317 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Science.

PHYS 346 - Energy and the Environment (3)

The physical principles and limitations of renewable energy source utilization and energy conversion. A quantitative introduction to energy conversion and storage systems, including solar power and heating; wind, tidal, geothermal, hydroelectric and nuclear power, hydrogen technology, electrical and mechanical energy storage. Prerequisite: CHEM 120 or 121; PHYS 102 or 121 or 126 or 141; MATH 152 or 155; all with a minimum grade of C-. Quantitative.

REM 375 - Ecology and Conservation of Coastal BC (3)

Investigates the ecosystems and environmental challenges of coastal British Columbia. Examines the major flora and fauna, fundamental ecological principles, anthropogenic drivers of change, and the role of applied science in conservation and management. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students with credit for MASC 414 may not take this course for further credit.

Environmental Management (Group C)

ARCH 286 - Cultural Heritage Management (3)

Examines cultural heritage management as the universal process by which people use places, objects and traditions from the past to educate, entertain, profit, promote change, maintain status quo, create identities, and build communities and nations. The course presents archaeology as one aspect of cultural heritage management and as an activity governed by national laws and international conventions for protecting and making appropriate use of heritage. Using case studies from Canada and abroad, the course explores stewardship as a fundamental professional ethic in archaeology and other fields engaged in studying, applying, and safeguarding personal, familial, communal, national, and transnational heritage. Prerequisite: 30 units including one of ARCH 100, ARCH 201, GEOG 100 or REM 100. Breadth-Humanities.

ARCH 363 - Landscape Archaeology (3)

The interpretation of archaeological evidence to look at the ways that people in the past perceived, constructed, and used their natural surroundings and their built environments. Prerequisite: ARCH 100 or ARCH 201, and 45 credit hours.

BUS 453 - Sustainable Innovation (3)

Challenges associated with continuing innovation are examined and students work to generate innovative solutions by challenging existing economic models. Students learn about sustainable opportunity, recognition, and screening, and understand how great ideas to 'save the plant' can get off the ground. Prerequisite: BUS 360W (or another upper division Writing (W) course); 60units. Recommended: BUS 338. Students with credit for BUS 494 when offered as Sustainable Innovation may not complete this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D700 Timothy Ames
Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
,
D701
Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
,
BUS 489 - Management Practices for Sustainability (3)

Businesses are realigning and in some cases, reinventing their organizations toward more sustainable business models. Management systems and initiatives will be examined that enable organizations to reduce their firms' negative environmental and social impacts while, in many cases, increasing profits and competitive advantage. Prerequisite: BUS 360W and 374; 60 units. Students who have taken BUS 457 cannot take this course for further credit.

CMNS 349 - Environment, Media and Communication (4)

An examination of how media, culture and communication shape public opinion and behaviour about environmental issues such as global warming, (un)sustainable resource use and pollution, with special attention to the impact of practices such as advertising, public relations, science and risk communication, journalism and advocacy communication upon public discourse about the environment, and the role of dialogue and deliberation in mediating and resolving conflict over environmental issues. Prerequisite: 45 units, including at least one upper division course in CMNS, DIAL, EVSC, GEOG or BlSC.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Shane Gunster
Mo 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
HCC 1800, Vancouver
D101
Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
HCC 1505, Vancouver
D102
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
HCC 1505, Vancouver
D103
Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
HCC 1505, Vancouver
D104
Mo 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
HCC 1505, Vancouver
J100 Darren Fleet
We 5:30 PM – 9:20 PM
HCC 1425, Vancouver
ECON 260 - Environmental Economics (3)

Economic analysis of environmental problems (water and air pollution, etc.). Evaluation of market failures due to externalities and public goods. Market and non-market regulation of environmental problems. Prerequisite: ECON 103 or 200. Students with credit for ECON 360 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Kevin Wainwright
Mo 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SWH 10041, Burnaby
ECON 362 - Economics of Natural Resources (3)

Application of economic analysis to natural resource problems and efficient management practice; public policy considerations in respect to development and conservation; benefit-cost analysis. Prerequisite: ECON 201 or 301; 60 units. Quantitative.

ECON 460 - Seminar in Environmental Economics (3)

Focus will vary from term to term. Prerequisite: ECON 302. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E100 Hendrik Wolff
Mo 5:30 PM – 8:20 PM
WMC 3511, Burnaby
GEOG 322 - World Resources (4)

An analysis of the use and development of natural resources from a geographic, economic and institutional perspective. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100. Students with credit for GEOG 322W may not take this course for further credit.

GEOG 385 - Food and the City (4)

An exploration of how food is related to cities, giving particular attention to the culture and politics of food production, distribution, and consumption. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100 or REM 100.

POL 452W - Energy Policy (4)

Examines the politics and policies of energy, including historical and technical perspectives. Topics include alternative energy, climate change, regulatory policy, and the economics of energy, as well as practical case studies. Students who have completed POL 459 in 2009 and 2010 may not complete this course for further credit. Writing.

REM 200 - Introduction to Resource and Environmental Management in Canada (3)

Explores the natural and social science foundations of resource and environmental management and demonstrates how that knowledge can be used in environmental decision-making. Provides a basic understanding of the nature and management of natural resources, strategic thinking for environmental planning, socio-economic and biophysical trade-offs in natural resource decision making and approaches for addressing uncertain knowledge. Prerequisite: One of REM 100, GEOG 100 or 111, or EVSC 100; and 30 units. Breadth-Social Sci/Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Duncan Knowler
Tu, Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 3150, Burnaby
D101
Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 2104, Burnaby
D102
Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
D103
Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 4140, Burnaby
D104
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5047, Burnaby
D105
Fr 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5028, Burnaby
REM 221 - Systems Thinking and the Environment (3)

Introduces systems thinking in the context of environmental and sustainability challenges using system archetypes and system dynamics theory. Analytical and modeling techniques are applied to understand and project systems complexity. Prerequisite: One of REM 100, or GEOG 100 or 111, or EVSC 100. Students with credit for ENV 221 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

REM 281 - Sustainable Communities, Sustainable World (3)

Introduces the challenges and opportunities for developing sustainable communities and a sustainable world, through the framework of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Builds an understanding of strengths and weaknesses of conventional approaches to development and of sustainable development. Emphasis on urban areas in the Global North and Global South. Prerequisite: 30 units. Students with credit for SCD 201 or REM 201 or SD 281 may not complete this course for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

or SD 281 - Sustainable Communities, Sustainable World (3)

Introduces the challenges and opportunities for developing sustainable communities and a sustainable world, through the framework of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Builds an understanding of strengths and weaknesses of conventional approaches to development and of sustainable development. Emphasis on urban areas in the Global North and Global South. Prerequisite: 30 units. Students with credit for SCD 201 or REM 201 or REM 281 may not complete this course for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Sessional
Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 4140, Burnaby
D101 Sessional
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 2122, Burnaby
D102 Sessional
Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
REM 319 - Environmental and Planning Law (3)

Provides a practical introduction to the legal system governing the use and protection of the environment in Canada. A central theme is the difference between the law on paper and the law in practice. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students who have taken ENV 399-3 "Special Topics in Environmental Law" in 2012 may not take this course for further credit. Students with credit for ENV 319 or PLAN 319 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E100 Sessional
Mo 5:30 PM – 8:20 PM
HCC 1800, Vancouver
REM 321 - Ecological Economics (4)

Introduces students to the concepts and methods of ecological economics. Provides students with grounding in the core principles of conventional economics applied to the environment but then extends this to the integration of economics and ecology to create a new ecological-economic understanding of environmental change and sustainability. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students with credit for ENV 321 cannot take REM 321 for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

REM 350 - Sustainable Energy and Materials Management (4)

Takes an interdisciplinary approach to sustainable management of society's energy and materials flows. Topics range from thermodynamics and estimates of global resources to market-based policies and governance Institutions. Peak oil, renewable energy and carbon capture and storage are also discussed. The role for green consumerism in light of climate challenge are highlighted. Prerequisite: 45 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Mark Jaccard
Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SSCB 9200, Burnaby
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
D101
Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 4115, Burnaby
D102
Tu 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5051, Burnaby
D103
Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 4115, Burnaby
D104
Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
D105
Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5038, Burnaby
D106
We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5014, Burnaby
D107
We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5038, Burnaby
D108
Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5004, Burnaby
D109
Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
BLU 10901, Burnaby
D110
Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5050, Burnaby
REM 356 - Institutional Arrangements for Sustainable Environmental Management (3)

This course provides an overview of some basic legislation, agencies, and policies which currently are in use to regulate the natural environment at the international, nation, provincial, regional, and local levels. Its purpose is to present a basic set of evaluative questions which can be used to address the effectiveness and efficiency of the environmental regulatory and management systems currently in use. Prerequisite: REM 100. Students with credit for REM 356W may not take this course for further credit.

REM 370 - Global Resource Issues in Oceanography (4)

Introduces principles of oceanography, including ocean circulation, ocean carbon cycling, nutrients and biological productivity, oceans and the climate system, and ocean resource contributions to global food supply. Provides basic understanding of ocean resource management including transportation, recreation, fisheries, and mining. Prerequisite: EVSC 100, or GEOG 111, or REM 100, and 45 units. Students with credit for MASC 435 may not take this course for further credit.

REM 375 - Ecology and Conservation of Coastal BC (3)

Investigates the ecosystems and environmental challenges of coastal British Columbia. Examines the major flora and fauna, fundamental ecological principles, anthropogenic drivers of change, and the role of applied science in conservation and management. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students with credit for MASC 414 may not take this course for further credit.

REM 381 - Building Sustainable Communities: Concepts and Cases (4)

Engages students in how to plan and cultivate sustainability at the community and city level, taking into consideration the environmental, economic, and social aspects of development. Explores and analyzes policy instruments, planning tools, and strategies from around the world for engaging people and institutions in building sustainable communities. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students with credit for SCD 301 or REM 301 or SD 381 may not complete this course for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Andreanne Doyon
Fr 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
HCC 2205, Vancouver
D101
Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
HCC 2205, Vancouver
or SD 381 - Building Sustainable Communities: Concepts and Cases (4)

Engages students in understanding how to plan and cultivate sustainability at the community and city level, taking into consideration the environmental, economic, and social aspects of development. Explores and analyzes policy instruments, planning tools, and strategies from around the world for engaging people and institutions in building sustainable communities. Prerequisite: Completion of 45 units or admission to the Post Baccalaureate Diploma in Sustainable Development. Students with credit for SCD 301 or REM 301 or REM 381 may not complete this course for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
REM 445 - Environmental Risk Assessment (4)

Students receive theory and practical experience in the control and management of hazardous substances in the environment. This includes the application of techniques used to assess toxicological, ecological and human health risks of contaminants within the current regulatory framework. Prerequisite: MATH 151 or 154 or 157; STAT 201 or 203 or 205 or GEOG 251 or equivalent; and 60 units.

REM 471 - Forest Ecosystem Management (4)

Forests are critical components of the earth system and provide diverse ecological services. They are also a source of conflict regarding their conservation and use. Students will examine the problems of managing forest ecosystems for a variety of societal goals and objectives. We begin by examining the ecological characteristics of forest ecosystems and follow with a focus on the objectives and tools of forest management. The final section of the course will examine institutions, economics, and policy related to forests, with a focus on British Columbia's historical and current management issues. This course will involve lectures, group discussions, field trips, and exercises. Prerequisite: One of REM 100, or GEOG 100 or 111, or EVSC 100 or BISC 102; and 45 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Sessional
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
BLU 10921, Burnaby
BLU 10921, Burnaby
D101
Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
BLU 10921, Burnaby
SD 401 - Sustainable Development Goals Studio (4)

Engages students in creating innovative solutions to real-world challenges of sustainability and development, using studio-based approaches. Explores the Sustainable Development Goals as a mechanism for effective governance in the context of Global North-South relations, and develops policies and strategies for implementing the Goals at local and global scales. Prerequisite: 60 units or admission to the Post Baccalaureate Diploma in Sustainable Development. Recommended: SD 281 or equivalent. Students with credit for DEVS 401 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E100 Sessional
We 5:30 PM – 9:20 PM
HCC 1415, Vancouver