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School of Criminology | Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Simon Fraser University Calendar | Spring 2020

Legal Studies Minor

Program Declaration and Continuation

Students with a minimum 2.25 cumulative grade point average (CGPA)* apply for program declaration to the School of Criminology after completing 30 units including all of the Criminology lower division requirements with minimum C- grades.

To continue in the minor, students must maintain a 2.25 CGPA. Students whose CGPA falls below 2.25 cannot enrol in any upper division CRIM courses.

*transfer students who meet the Criminology program declaration requirements upon admission to SFU may use their admission CGPA for declaration purposes

Lower Division Requirements

All of

CRIM 135 - Introduction to Canadian Law and Legal Institutions: A Criminal Justice Perspective (3)

A general introduction to the fundamental and competing principles of jurisprudence and to the basic legal institutions of Canada. Prepares students for those law and law related courses offered within the School of Criminology and will consider the history of Canadian law, the development of the Canadian constitution, the system of Canadian courts and the roles and responsibilities of members of the legal profession. In addition, the course will consider the nature of legal reasoning, the doctrine of precedent, principles of statutory interpretation and will also introduce the fields of contract, torts, administrative law, and family law. Also examines the process of law reform in Canada. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100 Amy Conroy
Th 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 3154, Burnaby
D101 Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
D102 Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
D103 Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
D104 Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
D105 Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
D106 Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
D107 Th 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
D900 Amy Conroy
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SRYC 2600, Surrey
D901 Tu 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SRYC 3260, Surrey
D902 Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SRYC 3260, Surrey
D903 Tu 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
SRYC 3260, Surrey
D904 We 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
SRYC 5060, Surrey
D905 We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SRYC 5060, Surrey
D906 We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SRYC 3010, Surrey
D907 We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SRYC 3010, Surrey
D908 We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SRYC 3010, Surrey
D909 We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SRYC 3010, Surrey
POL 151 - Justice and Law (3)

The development of laws and their application to the citizen and social groups. Special consideration will be given to civil liberties. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Clare McGovern
Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 3181, Burnaby
D101 Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5025, Burnaby
D102 Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5020, Burnaby
D103 Mo 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 2122, Burnaby
D104 Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 3251, Burnaby
D105 Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 2268, Burnaby
D106 Mo 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
WMC 2531, Burnaby
D900 Graeme Bowbrick
Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SRYC 2740, Surrey
D901 Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SRYC 2710, Surrey
D902 Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SRYC 2710, Surrey
D903 Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SRYC 2710, Surrey
D905 Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SRYC 2710, Surrey

and at least one of

CRIM 210 - Law, Youth and Young Offenders (3)

An analysis of the definition and control of youthful misconduct in an historical and contemporary context. Attention is focused upon: the social construction of 'juvenile delinquency', the decline of the concept, and the emergence of the concept of the 'young offender'; the Young Offenders Act and related legislation; the growth of the welfare state and the role of social workers in 'policing' youth and families; explanations for the criminal behavior of young persons; state and private sector programs designed to deal with such behavior. Prerequisite: CRIM 101 and CRIM 131.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100 Stephanie Wiley
Tu 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SWH 10081, Burnaby
D101 Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 2122, Burnaby
D102 Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5036, Burnaby
D103 Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5029, Burnaby
D104 Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D105 Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
CRIM 230 - Criminal Law (3)

Nature, purpose, scope, sources and basic principles of the criminal law. Study of certain fundamental legal concepts such as mens rea, negligence and strict liability. Analysis of the concept of criminal responsibility in Canada. Critical examination of the legislative policies expressed in the Criminal Code. Study of the basic elements of a criminal offence. Examination of the legal principles relating to certain specific crimes and to certain major defences. Impact of Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms on the criminal law. Prerequisite: CRIM 135.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Helene Love
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SSCK 9500, Burnaby
D101 Tu 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5004, Burnaby
D102 Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 2122, Burnaby
D103 We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5026, Burnaby
D104 We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5026, Burnaby
D105 We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5026, Burnaby
D106 We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
TASC2 7201, Burnaby
D107 We 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 6100, Burnaby
D108 We 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5026, Burnaby
J100 Iryna Ponomarenko
We 5:30 PM – 8:20 PM
SRYC 5100, Surrey

Upper Division Course Access and Requirements

Students with a minimum 2.25 CGPA are eligible to enrol in upper division Criminology courses upon successful completion of 60 units and Criminology program declaration.

Note that same upper division course may not be used for formal credit in both the criminology major and the legal studies minor. Students cannot obtain credit for both the post baccalaureate diploma in legal studies and this minor program.

Students complete a minimum of 18 upper division units including:

One of

CRIM 332 - Sociology of Law (3)

Introduction to the theory of sociology of law. Law and social structure. Law as a product of a social system and as an instrument of social change. Social functions of the law. Relationship between law and the structure and function of various other social institutions. The process of law-making. Process by which various interests become translated into legal rules. The social reality of the law; the law in action. Social sciences findings into the operation and practice of the law. Critical and feminist perspectives on law. Public knowledge, awareness, opinions and attitudes to the law, sanctions and the criminal justice system. Prerequisite: CRIM 101 and 135.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100 Barry Cartwright
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 3153, Burnaby
D101 We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SWH 10304, Burnaby
D102 We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SWH 10304, Burnaby
D103 We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SWH 10304, Burnaby
D104 We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SWH 10304, Burnaby
D105 We 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SWH 10304, Burnaby
D106 We 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SWH 10304, Burnaby
J100 Amy Conroy
Sa 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
HCC 1325, Vancouver
CRIM 338 - Philosophy of Law (3)

Introduction to the philosophy of law. Concepts of law, constitution and sovereignty. The nature and sources of the law. Examination of natural law, legal positivism, Kelsen's pure theory of law, legal realism, modern normative and analytical theories, critical legal theory and feminist theory. Prerequisite: CRIM 101 and 135.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Iryna Ponomarenko
Fr 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
RCB 8100, Burnaby
D101 Fr 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5026, Burnaby
D102 Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5046, Burnaby
D103 Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5046, Burnaby
D104 Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5046, Burnaby
D105 Fr 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5019, Burnaby

Students must select additional courses totalling at least 15 units from the upper division courses listed below. Students must ensure they have necessary lower division prerequisites.

Note: Students who have completed both CRIM 332 and 338 need only complete 12 units from the list below.

Criminology majors who wish to complete this minor must complete six of the upper division units in a discipline outside of their major.

BUS 393 - Commercial Law (3)

Common law, equity, and statute law; contracts, agency, and negotiable instruments; partnership and corporation law; international commercial law. Prerequisite: 45 units. BUEC 391 is not to be taken concurrently with BUS 393. Students with credit for COMM 393 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Mo 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 3153, Burnaby
D101 Mo 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
RCB 5100, Burnaby
D102 Mo 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
RCB 6100, Burnaby
D103 Mo 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
RCB 5100, Burnaby
D104 Mo 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
RCB 6100, Burnaby
D200 Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SRYP 291, Surrey
D201 Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SRYC 2990, Surrey
D202 Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SRYC 2995, Surrey
D203 Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SRYC 2990, Surrey
D204 Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SRYC 2995, Surrey
D300 Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 3260, Burnaby
D301 Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB 6122, Burnaby
D302 Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
TASC2 7201, Burnaby
D303 Tu 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
D304 Tu 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 8106, Burnaby
D400 Mo 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 3153, Burnaby
D401 Mo 6:30 PM – 7:20 PM
RCB 5100, Burnaby
D402 Mo 6:30 PM – 7:20 PM
RCB 6100, Burnaby
D403 Mo 7:30 PM – 8:20 PM
RCB 5100, Burnaby
D404 Mo 7:30 PM – 8:20 PM
RCB 6100, Burnaby
E100 Tu 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 3153, Burnaby
E101 Tu 6:30 PM – 7:20 PM
BLU 11911, Burnaby
E102 Tu 6:30 PM – 7:20 PM
RCB 6100, Burnaby
E103 Tu 7:30 PM – 8:20 PM
RCB 5100, Burnaby
E104 Tu 7:30 PM – 8:20 PM
RCB 6100, Burnaby
CRIM 310 - Young Offenders and Criminal Justice: Advanced Topics (3)

Examines some of the more complex contemporary issues relating to young offenders and justice. For any given term, the content of the course will reflect current controversies as well as faculty and student interests. Topics may include social control theory and juvenile justice; an assessment of theories of rehabilitation; the legal philosophy of the young offenders legislation and its impact on juvenile justice; and an evaluation of diversion, deinstitutionalization and de-legalization in Canada and the United States. Prerequisite: CRIM 101 and CRIM 210.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100 Amy Conroy
Tu 8:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SWH 10218, Burnaby
CRIM 314 - Mental Disorder, Criminality and the Law (3)

Critical examination of the impact of psychiatry and related clinical professions on the criminal justice system. Relationship between institutions of mental health and legal control. The relevance of psychiatric theory and decision-making for the processing of mentally disordered offenders. The role of forensic clinicians in the courts, prisons, mental hospitals and related agencies. Specific issues addressed in this course will include psychiatric assessment, criminal responsibility, fitness to stand trial, prediction of dangerousness, treatment of mentally ill criminals and the penal and therapeutic commitment of the insane. Prerequisite: CRIM 101. Recommended: CRIM 131.

CRIM 317 - Sex, Work, and the Law (3)

Examines the history of commercial sex in Canada, the related laws and their impacts; research on the breadth of the commercial sex industry, sex sellers, sex buyers, and third parties; theories about commercial sex involvement and its role in society; legal approaches to addressing commercial sex in other countries; current legal framework, including jurisprudence, relevant Criminal, Immigration, and municipal law. Prerequisite: CRIM 101. Students with credit for CRIM 313 (Specific Types of Crime) prior to Summer 2007 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Tamara O'Doherty
Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 3154, Burnaby
D101 Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SWH 10304, Burnaby
D102 Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SWH 10304, Burnaby
D103 Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SWH 10304, Burnaby
D104 Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SWH 10304, Burnaby
D105 Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SWH 10304, Burnaby
D106 Fr 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SWH 10304, Burnaby
CRIM 330 - Criminal Procedure and Evidence (3)

Critical examination of selected topics in criminal procedure and evidence, including jurisdiction, police powers of search and seizure, the right to counsel and pre-trial and trial procedures. Brief survey of the system of rules and standards by means of which the admissibility of evidence is determined. Close examination of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and its impact on criminal procedure and evidence. Prerequisite: CRIM 101 and 230.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100 Helene Love
Mo 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
EDB 7618, Burnaby
D101 Mo 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
D102 Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
D103 Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
D104 Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
D105 Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
D106 Mo 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
D107 Tu 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
D108 Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
D109 Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
D110 Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
D111 Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
D112 Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
CRIM 331 - Advanced Criminal Law (3)

An extension of CRIM 230, this course will examine Canadian criminal law in greater depth as well as in comparison with other jurisdictions. Each term several substantive areas will be analysed closely. The areas to be examined will be determined by student interest but may include sexual offences, public order offences, mental disorder and the criminal process, property offences, etc. Prerequisite: CRIM 101 and 230.

CRIM 333 - Gender, Law and the State (3)

A consideration of the relationship of women and men to the State, law and society. Analysis of concepts such as patriarchal relations, criminalization, racism and sexuality, using feminist and masculinity theories. Prerequisite: CRIM 101 and 135. Recommended: CRIM 213.

CRIM 334 - Law and Human Reproduction (3)

Overview of theoretical perspectives and available research on debates linked with human reproduction. Reconsideration of the effects of legislation, social policy and social change on contraception, birth, abortion, adoption, eugenics policies, new reproductive technologies, sexualities, and other topics. Historical and contemporary examples will be used. Feminist perspectives will be featured along with other approaches to human reproduction. Students with credit for CRIM 416, 417, 418 under the title Law and Reproduction, or GSWS 334 (or WS 334), may not take this course for further credit.

CRIM 335 - Human Rights and Civil Liberties (3)

A study of the relationship between the government and the individual. Focus upon the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and its interpretation by the judiciary. Examination of the issues of equality before the law, freedom of speech, freedom of religion and freedom of expression. A study of human rights at the international, federal and provincial levels.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100 Tamara O'Doherty
Fr 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SECB 1010, Burnaby
D101 Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SECB 1010, Burnaby
D102 Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
BLU 10031, Burnaby
D103 Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
BLU 10031, Burnaby
D104 Fr 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
BLU 10031, Burnaby
J100 Yun Li-Reilly
Mo 5:30 PM – 8:20 PM
HCC 2205, Vancouver
CRIM 336 - Corporate Crime and Corporate Regulation (3)

An examination and analysis of the nature, scope and impact of corporate crime, the principal organizational, social, political and economic factors involved in the definition and commission of such crime, and the ways in which governments and organizations respond to the problem. Particular types of corporate crime will be used as vehicles for exploring the legal and administrative framework that defines and regulates corporate wrongdoing. Prerequisite: CRIM 101 and 135. Recommended: ECON 101.

CRIM 416 - Current Issues in Criminology and Criminal Justice (3)

A critical analysis of certain 'hot' issues in criminology and criminal justice. The topics covered change from term to term. Prerequisite: CRIM 101.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Zachary Rowan
Th 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SWH 10218, Burnaby
CRIM 417 - Current Issues in Criminology and Criminal Justice (3)

A critical analysis of certain 'hot' issues in criminology and criminal justice. The topics covered change from term to term. Prerequisite: CRIM 101.

CRIM 418 - Current Issues in Criminology and Criminal Justice (3)

A critical analysis of certain 'hot' issues in criminology and criminal justice. The topics covered change from term to term. Prerequisite: CRIM 101.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Rylan Simpson
We 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
BLU 11911, Burnaby
CRIM 429 - Indigenous Peoples and International Law (3)

An examination of how relations between indigenous and non-indigenous peoples framed and were framed by the development of international law from the 15th century onward. Prerequisite: CRIM 101 or FNST 101 or 201 or permission of instructor. Students with credit for CRIM 416, or 418 under the title "Indigenous Peoples and International Law" or "Indigenous Peoples and Evolving International Relations", or FNST 429 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Ted Palys
Tu 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SWH 10218, Burnaby
CRIM 432 - Gender in the Courts and the Legal Profession (3)

The gendered nature of law will be addressed through an examination of its underlying factual assumptions, and the use of social science research as evidence in equality litigation. The use of the charter, human rights legislation, and other legal means to achieve gender equality through the legal system in the areas of work, employment and pay equity, and compensatory schemes for personal injuries will also be examined. This course will also examine women's struggles to gain admittance to the legal profession, and the barriers which may still prevent them from participating equally in the profession today. Prerequisite: CRIM 330.

Section Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
CRIM 436 - Corporate Crime and Corporate Regulation: Advanced Topics (3)

A detailed examination and analysis of particular types of corporate wrongdoing and the nature and impact of the relevant legal and administrative framework. The topics will be selected by the particular course instructor and will, therefore, vary according to the instructor's interests as well as topicality. The areas of corporate crime which are chosen may include one or more of the following: 'economic crimes' such as violations of statutes which regulate competition, protect intellectual property, and safeguard stock market investors; crimes against the environment such as air and water pollution; and, crimes against consumers including the marketing of hazardous products, contaminated food, or dangerous drugs and devices. Prerequisite: CRIM 101. Recommended: CRIM 336.

CRIM 437 - Crime and Misconduct in the Professions (3)

Examines the use of self regulation by professional organizations (e.g. law societies, colleges of physicians and surgeons) and the increasing demand by other occupational groups and social and economic entities to be governed by these internal controls in addition to, or in lieu of, the criminal and other state law. It will specifically examine how the criminal law is used in the context of self-regulation and how professionals can bypass the criminal law through self-regulating organizations. The professions will be examined in the context of administrative, civil and criminal law. Implications for self regulation in other areas and the future of self-regulation will also be considered. Prerequisite: Recommended: CRIM 330.

CRIM 438 - Wrongful Convictions and Other Miscarriages of Justice (3)

Examines the issues of wrongful convictions and other miscarriages of justice. Considers the major factors that contribute to wrongful convictions despite the safeguards built into the system, and ways to prevent or reduce their number. Prerequisite: CRIM 330 is recommended. Students with credit for CRIM 417 under this title (Fall 2007 or Fall 2008) may not take this course for further credit.

ECON 427W - Industrial Organization: Law and Economics (3)

An in depth examination of the application of economic reasoning to the law. The course considers how legal relationships influence behavior and how economic models can explain the structure of the law. A selected number of topics will be covered, and may include the economic approach to common law; property rights; contracts; torts; criminal behavior; family law; and corporate bankruptcy law. Prerequisite: ECON 201 or 301, and ECON (or BUEC 333) or ECON 302. Students with credit for BUEC 427 or BUEC 495 may not take this course for further credit. Writing.

EDUC 445 - Legal Context of Teaching (4)

Designed to provide education students, teachers, counsellors and school administrators with a comprehensive understanding of the legal issues and potential legal liabilities encountered in the BC public school system. Special attention is devoted to the legal dimensions and consequences of routine classroom and administrative activity. Topics include: sexual abuse by school board employees; negligence and supervision; private lifestyles and community standards; discipline and corporal punishment; sexual harassment in the workplace; responsibility for curriculum fulfillment; liability outside school hours; and the AIDS controversy. Prerequisite: 60 units.

EDUC 446 - Law for the Classroom Teacher (4)

Provides a fundamental knowledge of law to teach law-related content in the BC curriculum: social studies, science, personal planning, language arts, P.E., social responsibility, and business. Topics: Canadian legal system, legal history, legal reasoning, dispute resolution strategies, the role of the courts, and family, environmental, property and contract laws. Prerequisite: 60 units.

Section Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
EDUC 448 - Teaching about Justice, Law and Citizenship (4)

The justification and practise of law-related education in the K-12 curriculum are the subjects of this methodology course. Students will examine the place of law in the curriculum, existing resources and appropriate teaching strategies and will have the opportunity to develop unit plans and curriculum materials. Emphasis is on developing and implementing law-related programs in the classroom. Prerequisite: 60 units including six in education courses. Teaching experience is recommended.

GSWS 411 - Special Topics in Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies (4) **

A specific theme within the field of gender, sexuality, and women's studies, not otherwise covered in depth in regularly scheduled courses, will be dealt with as occasion and demand warrant. Prerequisite: 45 units, including six units in GSWS.

HIST 443W - Aboriginal Peoples, History and the Law (4)

Traces the development of legal doctrine pertaining to Aboriginal peoples in Canada and the United States, including its shared roots in British colonial law and policy. Prerequisite: 45 units including nine units of lower division history. Students with credit for FNST 443, or HIST 485 or 486 under this topic may not take this course for further credit. Writing.

or FNST 443W - Aboriginal Peoples, History and the Law (4)

Traces the development of legal doctrine pertaining to Aboriginal peoples in Canada and the United States, including its shared roots in British colonial law and policy. Prerequisite: 45 units including FNST 101, 201W and one other FNST course; or permission of the instructor. Students with credit for HIST 443, or HIST 485 or 486 under this topic may not take this course for further credit. Writing.

PHIL 320 - Social and Political Philosophy (3)

An examination of an issue or selection of issues in social and political philosophy. Contemporary or historical readings or a mixture of these will be used. Possible topics include: justice, the law and legal systems, sovereignty, power and authority, democracy, liberty and equality. Sometimes the course will focus on the views of historically important political philosophers, such as Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Burke, Bentham, Mill and Marx. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 120W (or equivalent), 121, 220, 221 or ENV 320W.

PHIL 321 - Topics in Moral Philosophy (3)

An advanced investigation of central issues and theories in moral philosophy. In any given term, the course may focus on a general theory or concept or concern, for example meta-ethics, utilitarianism, or theories of rights. Sometimes it will focus on a particular problem or problems, such as medical ethics, moral personhood, or free will and moral responsibility. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 120W (or equivalent), 121, 220, 221 or ENV 320W.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Bruno Guindon
Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5037, Burnaby
WMC 3510, Burnaby
POL 324 - The Canadian Constitution (4)

An analysis of the Canadian constitution from a theoretical and comparative perspective. Amendment, entrenchment, civil rights. Prerequisite: Six lower division units in political science or permission of the department.

POL 344 - International Law (4)

Sovereignty, nationality, jurisdiction, arbitration. Examination of selected cases exemplifying present trends in the international legal order. Prerequisite: Six lower division units in political science or permission of the department.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
J100 Linda Elmose
Fr 5:30 PM – 9:20 PM
HCC 1315, Vancouver
POL 346 - International Organization (4)

An examination of the structures and processes and the main substantive decisions of the United Nations and related international organizations. Based upon in-depth study of the UN Charter, the Security Council, General Assembly, Secretary-general and Secretariat and their constitutional and political interactions since 1945, with special attention to the theory and practice of international organization advanced by the principal Western countries, the Soviet Union and Soviet bloc, the People's Republic of China and leading Third World countries. Prerequisite: Six lower division units in political science or permission of the department.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Th 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
BLU 10021, Burnaby
POL 351 - Immigration, Integration, and Public Policy in Canada (4)

Explores the governance challenges related to immigration and integration in Canada using a public policy approach. The course deals with topics concerning immigrant selection (including immigration categories, temporary/permanent Immigration, intergovernmental agreements, etc.) and focuses on immigrant's integration into society (such as nation-building strategies, integration Indicators and discrimination). Prerequisite: Six lower division units in political science or permission of the department. Students who have taken Selected Topics course POL 359 with this topic may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Shiva Olyaei
We 9:30 AM – 1:20 PM
SECB 1012, Burnaby
POL 417 - Human Rights Theories (4)

This course introduces students to the problems involved in the assertion of universal moral standards across political and cultural divides. These issues will be explored at a theoretical level, and in the context of specific human rights controversies. Prerequisite: Eight upper division units in political science or permission of the department. Recommended: PHIL 220 or 320.

POL 459 - Selected Topics in Governance (4) *

Prerequisite: Eight upper division units in political science or permission of the department.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
F100 Joƫlle Alice Michaud-Ouellet
We 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5025, Burnaby
PSYC 376 - Experimental Psychology and Law (3)

The roles of experimental developmental, cognitive, and social psychology in the understanding of behavior and perceptions of individuals in legal contexts. Topics include eyewitness testimony, autobiographical memory, interviewing, deception detection, and juror decision-making. Prerequisite: PSYC 201W and PSYC 268. Recommended: PSYC 210.

Section Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
PSYC 379 - Clinical Forensic Psychology (3)

Clinical approaches to the understanding of behavior in criminal and civil forensic settings. Topics related to the assessment, treatment, and management of people suffering from mental disorder. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 268. PSYC 241 is recommended.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Kevin Douglas
Tu 8:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 3154, Burnaby
PSYC 476 - Advanced Topics in Law and Forensic Psychology (4)

Course can be repeated for credit. Students may not take this course for further credit if similar topics are covered. See Psychology department website for course description. Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 210, 268, 60 units, and a CGPA of 3.0. Other prerequisites vary by topic offering.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Ryan Fitzgerald
Mo 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
RCB 7206, Burnaby
WL 303 - Global Culture and Its Discontents (4)

Explores the tendencies of globalization in the cultural realm, which while sparking cross-border communication, also tends to flatten identities into a coercive global norm. Focuses on writing in contexts of political oppression, digital communities, censorship, cultural displacement, terrorism and/or warfare. Prerequisite: 45 units. Breadth-Humanities.

Check with the school for additional relevant courses.

Declared Criminology students may not take CRIM 301 for credit.

* when offered as a legal topic

** when offered as the topic Women and the Law

Graduation Requirements

Students must obtain a minimum grade of C- in all required courses. For graduation, students must obtain a minimum 2.25 CGPA, 2.25 UDGPA, 2.25 Criminology program CGPA, and 2.25 Criminology program UDGPA.

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Degree Requirements

For all bachelor of arts (BA) programs, students complete 120 units, which includes

  • at least 60 units that must be completed at Simon Fraser University
  • at least 45 upper division units, of which at least 30 upper division units must be completed at Simon Fraser University
  • at least 65 units (including 21 upper division units) in Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences courses
  • satisfaction of the writing, quantitative, and breadth requirements
  • an overall cumulative grade point average (CGPA) and upper division CGPA of at least 2.0, and a program (major, joint major, extended minor, minor) CGPA and upper division CGPA of at least 2.0

For students in other Faculties, please check your Faculty's overall degree requirements: https://www.sfu.ca/students/calendar/faculties-research.html

Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements

Students admitted to Simon Fraser University beginning in the fall 2006 term must meet writing, quantitative and breadth requirements as part of any degree program they may undertake. See Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements for university-wide information.

WQB Graduation Requirements

A grade of C- or better is required to earn W, Q or B credit

Requirement

Units

Notes
W - Writing

6

Must include at least one upper division course, taken at Simon Fraser University within the student’s major subject
Q - Quantitative

6

Q courses may be lower or upper division
B - Breadth

18

Designated Breadth Must be outside the student’s major subject, and may be lower or upper division
6 units Social Sciences: B-Soc
6 units Humanities: B-Hum
6 units Sciences: B-Sci

6

Additional Breadth 6 units outside the student’s major subject (may or may not be B-designated courses, and will likely help fulfil individual degree program requirements)

Students choosing to complete a joint major, joint honours, double major, two extended minors, an extended minor and a minor, or two minors may satisfy the breadth requirements (designated or not designated) with courses completed in either one or both program areas.