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Department of Psychology | Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Simon Fraser University Calendar | Summer 2020

Psychology

Master of Arts

The Department of Psychology prepares students for research and applied careers. The department offers courses and specializations in Cognitive and Neural Sciences; Developmental; Law and Forensic; Social; and History, Quantitative and Theoretical Psychology.

Admission Requirements

Applicants must satisfy the University admission requirements as stated in Graduate General Regulations 1.3 in the SFU Calendar. Applicants to this program are required to submit official Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) results as part of their application. Applicants will submit official transcripts of all post-secondary course work and Graduate Record Examinations (GREs) to the department. Refer to the department’s website for deadlines and additional requirements (http://www.psyc.sfu.ca/grad).

Incomplete or late applications will not be considered. The department reserves the right to admit only qualified applicants for whom departmental resources and appropriate faculty supervisors are available.

Program Requirements

This program offers five areas of specialization and consists of graduate course work and a thesis for a minimum of 30 units.

Students must complete

PSYC 910 - Research Design I: Experiments (3)

Reviews the basic logic of controlled experimentation, and focuses on analysis of variance designs commonly used in psychological research. Particular emphasis is given to the relative merits of the several designs when there are multiple research questions to be answered.

PSYC 911 - Research Design II: Research Studies (3)

Focuses on multivariate regression and correlation models. Deals with ways of answering questions when direct experimental manipulation is not feasible, and emphasizes new applications.

and one of the following research seminar courses specific to specialization taken every Fall and Spring

PSYC 913 - Research Seminar (1.5)

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

PSYC 914 - Research Seminar (1.5)

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

PSYC 916 - Research Seminar (1.5)

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

PSYC 917 - Research Seminar (1.5)

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

PSYC 918 - Research Seminar (1.5)

Research seminars are designed specifically to enable graduate students in Psychology to plan, execute, and analyse research including that leading to MA and PhD degrees. The seminars will provide directions for future research, critical discussion of pending designs, aid in resolving problems in ongoing studies, and alternative interpretations of results of completed projects. The research seminar courses are graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

and the requirements from one of the five areas of specialization below

and two PSYC graduate courses outside of student's specialization area

and a thesis proposal

PSYC 895 - MA Thesis Proposal (3)

Development and presentation of proposal for MA thesis research. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

and a thesis

PSYC 898 - MA Thesis (12)

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

Specialization

Cognitive and Neural Sciences Specialization

Students must complete a minimum of two area courses determined in consultation with the student's supervisor and graduate program chair.

Developmental Psychology Specialization

Students must complete

PSYC 824 - Research Issues in Psychology (3)

Prerequisite: Admission to the Masters or Doctoral program.

and a minimum two of

History, Quantitative and Theoretical Psychology Specialization

Students must complete a minimum of two area courses determined in consultation with the student's supervisor and graduate program chair.

Law and Forensic Psychology Specialization

Students must complete

PSYC 824 - Research Issues in Psychology (3)

Prerequisite: Admission to the Masters or Doctoral program.

and a minimum two of

PSYC 791 - Proseminar 2 in Law and Psychology (3)

Empirical and legal issues in law and psychology.

Social Psychology Specialization

Students must complete

PSYC 824 - Research Issues in Psychology (3)

Prerequisite: Admission to the Masters or Doctoral program.

and a minimum two of

* This course may be repeated for credit.

Clinical Psychology Program Requirements

Students in the clinical program are all members of the clinical research area. The PhD program, accredited by the Canadian Psychological Association (CPA), is based on the scientist-practitioner training model. The program provides generalist training and optional tracks in clinical child psychology, clinical forensic psychology, and clinical neuropsychology. Standing in the program is contingent upon maintenance of satisfactory performance in course work, thesis work, practicum skills development, comprehensive exams and adherence to professional ethical standards (CPA Code of Ethics, and CPBC Code of Conduct). Unsatisfactory academic progress and/or CPA ethical code of conduct violations (e.g. dishonesty, boundary violations, etc.) may lead to withdrawal from the clinical program.

The clinical MA program consists of graduate course work and thesis for a minimum of 30 units.

Students must complete all of

PSYC 820A - Psychological Assessment I (3)

History, theory, and clinical issues in the psychological assessment of mental abilities. Prerequisite: Admission to the Clinical Psychology Graduate Program.

PSYC 820B - Psychological Assessment II (3)

History, theory, and clinical issues in the psychological assessment of personality and psychopathology. Prerequisite: Admission to the Clinical Psychology Graduate Program. Corequisite: PSYC 821B.

PSYC 821A - Practicum in Psychological Assessment I (2)

Administration and interpretation of tests that assess mental abilities. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Admission to the Clinical Psychology Graduate Program. Corequisite: Enrollment in PSYC 820A. Students must successfully complete a Criminal Record Check.

PSYC 821B - Practicum in Psychological Assessment II (2)

Administration and interpretation of tests that assess personality and psychopathology. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: PSYC 821A. Corequisite: PSYC 820B. Students must successfully complete a Criminal Record Check.

PSYC 822 - Psychological Intervention I (3)

Introduction to theoretical concepts and practical applications of therapy. Prerequisite: Admission to the Clinical Psychology Graduate Program.

PSYC 823 - Psychological Intervention II (3)

Science, theory, and practice of evidence-based psychological interventions with an emphasis on cognitive-behaviourally (CBT) oriented approaches. Prerequisite: Admission to the Clinical Psychology Graduate Program.

PSYC 824 - Research Issues in Psychology (3)

Prerequisite: Admission to the Masters or Doctoral program.

PSYC 825 - Clinical Practice (2) **

Required every term prior to internship except when granted 'on leave' status from PSYC 825, or when enrolled in PSYC 880 and also inactive at the Clinical Psychology Centre (CPC). Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Admission to Clinical Psychology Graduate Program. Students must successfully complete a Criminal Record Check.

PSYC 880 - Junior Practicum (3)

450 hour placement to complete clinical work in an approved setting. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: PSYC 744, 770, 820, 821, 910, 911. Students must successfully complete a Criminal Record Check.

PSYC 910 - Research Design I: Experiments (3)

Reviews the basic logic of controlled experimentation, and focuses on analysis of variance designs commonly used in psychological research. Particular emphasis is given to the relative merits of the several designs when there are multiple research questions to be answered.

PSYC 911 - Research Design II: Research Studies (3)

Focuses on multivariate regression and correlation models. Deals with ways of answering questions when direct experimental manipulation is not feasible, and emphasizes new applications.

and one of the following every fall and spring term

PSYC 912 - Research Seminar (1.5)

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

PSYC 913 - Research Seminar (1.5)

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

PSYC 914 - Research Seminar (1.5)

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

PSYC 916 - Research Seminar (1.5)

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

PSYC 917 - Research Seminar (1.5)

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

PSYC 918 - Research Seminar (1.5)

Research seminars are designed specifically to enable graduate students in Psychology to plan, execute, and analyse research including that leading to MA and PhD degrees. The seminars will provide directions for future research, critical discussion of pending designs, aid in resolving problems in ongoing studies, and alternative interpretations of results of completed projects. The research seminar courses are graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

and the requirements from one of the tracks below

and a thesis proposal

PSYC 895 - MA Thesis Proposal (3)

Development and presentation of proposal for MA thesis research. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

and a thesis

PSYC 898 - MA Thesis (12)

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.

** Students must be enrolled in PSYC 825 every term.

Clinical Psychology Tracks

Clinical General Track

Students must complete two of the following in consultation with the student's supervisor and director of clinical training

  • Advanced Topics in Assessment or Intervention Course 1
  • Advanced Topics in Assessment or Intervention Course 2
  • Advanced Topics in Assessment or Intervention Course 3
  • Advanced Topics in Assessment or Intervention Course 4

Clinical Child Track

Students must complete two of the following

PSYC 807A - Advanced Topics in Intervention: Child Therapy (3)

Current theoretical and empirical issues in the area of child and adolescent therapy. Prerequisite: PSYC 820, 821, 822, 823, and 824; or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 807B - Advanced Topics in Intervention: Family Therapy (3)

Provides an overview of the current theoretical and empirical issues in the area of family therapy. Prerequisite: All of PSYC 820, 821, 822, 823, and 824; or permission of the instructor.

PSYC 830 - Seminar in Child Evaluation and Treatment Formulation (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 820.

and PSYC 831 - Practicum in Child Evaluation and Treatment Formulation (2)

Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: PSYC 820. Corequisite: PSYC 830. Students must successfully complete a Criminal Record Check.

Clinical Forensic Track

Students must complete two of the following

PSYC 791 - Proseminar 2 in Law and Psychology (3)

Empirical and legal issues in law and psychology.

PSYC 836 - Forensic Assessment (3)

Criminal and civil forensic assessment issues. Prerequisite: PSYC 790, 815.

Clinical Neuropsychology Track

Students must complete two of the following

PSYC 806 - Advanced Topics in Assessment (3)

Prerequisite: PSYC 820, 821, 822, 823, 824, or permission of the instructor.

ANAT 516 - Functional Human Neuroanatomy: Central Nervous System (3) (UBC)

Program Length

Students are expected to complete the program requirements in six terms.

Other Information

Transfer from MA to PhD

Students with a previous master's degree can apply mid-program to the fast-track PhD program (http://www.psyc.sfu.ca/grad); students who are accepted are not required to complete an MA thesis. Students in the MA program will not be permitted to enroll in PhD course work until they are admitted to the PhD, or receive approval from their supervisor, area coordinator and graduate program chair.

Satisfactory Performance

It is the policy of the Department of Psychology that a grade of less than B (3.0) on any course is deemed unsatisfactory. Any graduate student who obtains a grade of less than B (3.0) in two or more courses or who fails to maintain a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of at least 3.5, may be required to withdraw from the program. Additionally, students who receive unsatisfactory ratings on their annual evaluations, whether due to grades, inadequate progress through the program or unethical behavior, may be withdrawn from the program (as per Graduate General Regulation 1.8.2).

A student in the clinical psychology program whose behaviour raises the question of possible violations of the ethical codes binding the profession (CPA Code of Ethics, and CPBC Code of Conduct) will be advised of the nature of the problem behaviour in writing, and requested to meet with the clinical committee in a confidential closed session to determine the facts. Access to clinical clients may be immediately suspended pending the outcome of this meeting. The student will be invited to present any information and to respond to any questions. Whether or not the student attends, the committee members subsequently will meet in camera to consider the facts, and to decide on a recommendation to make to the graduate studies committee (GSC) of the department. Possible outcomes of this process include limitation of clinical training work, restriction of contact with clinical clients or research participants, remedial work, and recommendation of termination from the program. Issues pertaining to ethical integrity of students in the Psychology Graduate Program are subject to the same codes of conduct and will follow the same procedures as described above, but will be handled directly by the graduate studies committee.

A student may appeal the decision to the GSC of the department. The GSC will adjudicate the appeal using procedures outlined in Graduate General Regulation 1.8.2 Review of Unsatisfactory Progress. The grounds for appeal are errors or unfairness in the procedures that were followed.

Translational and Integrative Neuroscience (TRAIN) Specialization

Students interested in taking NEUR 800 and NEUR 801 to fulfill their graduate course requirements need to consult with the supervisor and graduate program chair.

For more information on TRAIN, please see Translational and Integrative Neuroscience.

Thesis

Students are required to present a written thesis proposal to their supervisory committee before the end of their fourth term in the program. After the thesis has been submitted an oral defence will be scheduled. Students are expected to have completed their thesis by the end of their second year in the program. For further information and regulations, see Graduate General Regulations 1.9.2.

Supervisory Committees

For the thesis, students establish a supervisory committee before the end of their first term. The supervisory committee will normally consist of at least two Department of Psychology tenure-track or tenured faculty members, one of whom will be the supervisor and committee chair. Other individuals who are considered necessary by the student and supervisor may serve on the committee.

Academic Requirements within the Graduate General Regulations

All graduate students must satisfy the academic requirements that are specified in the Graduate General Regulations, as well as the specific requirements for the program in which they are enrolled.