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Department of Earth Sciences, Department of Chemistry | Faculty of Science Simon Fraser University Calendar | Summer 2021

Chemistry and Earth Sciences Joint Major

Bachelor of Science

This Bachelor of Science (BSc) program is offered jointly by the Departments of Chemistry and Earth Sciences.

Admission Requirements

Entry requires permission of both departments.

Minimum Grade Requirement

Students wishing to enroll in Chemistry and Earth Sciences courses must obtain a C- grade or better in prerequisite courses.

Program Requirements

Students complete a minimum of 123 units, as specified below.

Lower Division Requirements

Students will complete a minimum of 69 units including all of

CHEM 121 - General Chemistry and Laboratory I (4)

Atomic and molecular structure; chemical bonding; thermochemistry; elements; periodic table; gases liquids, solids, and solutions. This course includes a laboratory component. Prerequisite: Chemistry 12 with a minimum grade of C, or CHEM 109 or 111 with a minimum grade of C-. Students with credit for CHEM 120 or 125 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

CHEM 122 - General Chemistry II (2)

Chemical equilibria; electrochemistry; chemical thermodynamics; kinetics. Students who intend to take further laboratory courses in chemistry should take CHEM 122 concurrently with CHEM 126. Prerequisite: CHEM 120 or 121 with a minimum grade of C-. Students with credit for CHEM 124 or CHEM 180 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Hogan Yu
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D101 We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D102 We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D103 Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D104 Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D105 Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D106 Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D107 We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D108 We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D109 Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D110 Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
CHEM 126 - General Chemistry Laboratory II (2)

Experiments in chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, qualitative analysis, electrochemistry and chemical kinetics. Prerequisite: CHEM 121 with a minimum grade of C-. Corequisite: CHEM 122. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
LA03 Garry Mund
Tu 8:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SSCC 7071, Burnaby
LA04 Garry Mund
Tu 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCC 7071, Burnaby
LA05 Garry Mund
We 8:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SSCC 7071, Burnaby
LA06 Garry Mund
We 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCC 7071, Burnaby
LA07 Garry Mund
Th 8:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SSCC 7071, Burnaby
LA08 Garry Mund
Th 1:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCC 7071, Burnaby
CHEM 215 - Introduction to Analytical Chemistry and Laboratory (4)

The principles of analytical chemistry and their practical application to solution samples. Titrimetric and electrochemical methods. Prerequisite: CHEM 122 and 126, both with a minimum grade of C-. Students with credit for CHEM 210 or 216 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

CHEM 230 - Inorganic Chemistry (3)

The chemistry of the elements and their inorganic compounds in terms of fundamental concepts of periodicity of properties, valence, ionization potential, electron affinity, electronegativity, stability of oxidation states, bonding, structure and stereochemistry. Co-ordination complexes and organometallic chemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 122 with a minimum grade of C-. Students who expect to take further courses in inorganic chemistry should take CHEM 230 concurrently with CHEM 236W. Quantitative.

CHEM 236W - Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory (3)

An introduction to the synthetic and spectroscopic techniques used in the preparation and characterization of both main group and transition metal compounds. Prerequisite: CHEM 126 with a minimum grade of C-. Corequisite: CHEM 230. Students with credit for CHEM 236 may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Quantitative.

CHEM 260 - Atoms, Molecules, Spectroscopy (4)

Elements of physical chemistry from the molecular point of view. Introduction to quantum chemistry, atomic and molecular structure, and spectroscopy. Prerequisite: CHEM 122, MATH 152, and PHYS 121, 126 or 141 (or PHYS 102 with a minimum grade of B), all with a minimum grade of C-. Recommended: MATH 232. PHYS 285 will be accepted in lieu of CHEM 260. Quantitative.

CHEM 281 - Organic Chemistry and Laboratory I (4)

Structure, bonding, physical and chemical properties of simple organic compounds. Introduction to spectroscopy. Kinetics and mechanisms of organic reactions. This course includes a laboratory component. Prerequisite: CHEM 121 with a minimum grade of C-. Corequisite: CHEM 122. Students with credit for CHEM 280 or CHEM 285 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

EASC 101 - Dynamic Earth (3)

Origin and character of minerals, rocks, Earth structure, Earth surface processes and plate tectonic theory. Primarily designed to deliver prereq. information to EASC majors/honours and students pursuing degrees in other Departments and Faculties that require a strong foundational course in Earth Science. Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Kevin Cameron
Mo, We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D101 Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
,
D102 Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
,
D103 We 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
,
D104 We 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
,
EASC 201 - Stratigraphy and Sedimentation (3)

An introduction to the nature, origin and interpretation of stratified earth materials. Principles of lithostratigraphy, biostratigraphy and chronostratigraphy, sequence stratigraphy, the facies concept. Prerequisite: EASC 210 with a grade of C- or better.

EASC 202 - Introduction to Mineralogy (3)

Introduction to crystallography, crystal chemistry and chemical properties and chemical principles necessary for the study of minerals. Prerequisite: EASC 101 and CHEM 121. All with a grade of C- or better.

EASC 204 - Structural Geology I (3)

Description, classification and interpretation of earth structures: folds, faults, joints, cleavage and lineations. Elementary rock mechanics. Prerequisite: EASC 210, PHYS 101 or 120 or 125 or 140. All with a grade of C- or better.

EASC 205 - Introduction to Petrology (3)

Optical phenomena related to the use of the polarizing microscope in the identification of minerals in thin section. Petrogenesis and classification of igneous sedimentary and metamorphic rocks. Hand specimen and thin section identification of rocks and minerals. Prerequisite: EASC 202, CHEM 122, and one of: (PHYS 102 and PHYS 130), (PHYS 121 and PHYS 133), (PHYS 126 and PHYS 133) or (PHYS 141). All with a grade of C- or better.

EASC 206 - Field Geology I (2)

Methods of field navigation, geological mapping and the interpretation of geological field data including cross sections, the geological time scale, and stratigraphic sections and columns. Includes two weekend field trips. Field locations may vary from year to year. All lectures and field trips are mandatory. Prerequisite: EASC 101 and prerequisite/co-requisite: EASC 210. All with a grade of C- or better.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Derek Thorkelson
TBD
EASC 207 - Introduction to Applied Geophysics (3)

An introduction to geophysics emphasizing seismic, magnetic and gravimetric observations of the Earth. Applied geophysics. Prerequisite: MATH 152, and one of: (PHYS 102 and PHYS 130), (PHYS 121 and PHYS 133), (PHYS 126 and PHYS 133) or (PHYS 141). All with a grade of C- or better. Quantitative.

EASC 208 - Introduction to Geochemistry (3)

Distribution and cycles of elements, minerals and rocks on and within Earth. Understanding and evolution of Earth systems through high and low temperature fluid-rock interaction, aqueous geochemistry, stable and radiogenic isotopes. Prerequisite: EASC 202, CHEM 121, 122 and 126. All with a grade of C- or better. Quantitative.

EASC 209W - Environmental Geoscience (4)

Environmental geology is a branch of Earth science that deals with the relationship of people to their geological habitat. Topics covered will include environmental impact of mineral extraction and logging; erosion and sedimentation in rural and urban environments; and mass movements in mountainous terrain. The course includes two 1-day field trips that usually occur on Saturdays. This course is primarily designed for EASC program students and those pursuing degrees in other Departments and Faculties that require a strong foundational course in Environmental Geoscience. Prerequisite: EASC 101 with a grade of C- or better. Students with credits for EASC 303W may not take this course for credit. Writing.

EASC 210 - Evolving Earth (3)

The study of the evolution of the Earth, the geological time scale, fossils and evolution, stratigraphic concepts, geological history of western Canada. Prerequisite: EASC 101 with a grade of C- or better. Breadth-Science.

MATH 151 - Calculus I (3)

Designed for students specializing in mathematics, physics, chemistry, computing science and engineering. Logarithmic and exponential functions, trigonometric functions, inverse functions. Limits, continuity, and derivatives. Techniques of differentiation, including logarithmic and implicit differentiation. The Mean Value Theorem. Applications of differentiation including extrema, curve sketching, Newton's method. Introduction to modeling with differential equations. Polar coordinates, parametric curves. Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus 12 (or equivalent) with a grade of at least A, or MATH 100 with a grade of at least B, or achieving a satisfactory grade on the Simon Fraser University Calculus Readiness Test. Students with credit for either MATH 150, 154 or 157 may not take MATH 151 for further credit. Quantitative.

or MATH 150 - Calculus I with Review (4)

Designed for students specializing in mathematics, physics, chemistry, computing science and engineering. Topics as for Math 151 with a more extensive review of functions, their properties and their graphs. Recommended for students with no previous knowledge of Calculus. In addition to regularly scheduled lectures, students enrolled in this course are encouraged to come for assistance to the Calculus Workshop (Burnaby), or Math Open Lab (Surrey). Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus 12 (or equivalent) with a grade of at least B+, or MATH 100 with a grade of at least B-, or achieving a satisfactory grade on the Simon Fraser University Calculus Readiness Test. Students with credit for either MATH 151, 154 or 157 may not take MATH 150 for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Mo, We, Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
OP01 TBD
MATH 152 - Calculus II (3)

Riemann sum, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, definite, indefinite and improper integrals, approximate integration, integration techniques, applications of integration. First-order separable differential equations and growth models. Sequences and series, series tests, power series, convergence and applications of power series. Prerequisite: MATH 150 or 151, with a minimum grade of C-; or MATH 154 or 157 with a grade of at least B. Students with credit for MATH 155 or 158 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Vijaykumar Singh
Mo, We, Fr 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
OP01 TBD

and one of

STAT 201 - Statistics for the Life Sciences (3)

Research methodology and associated statistical analysis techniques for students with training in the life sciences. Intended to be particularly accessible to students who are not specializing in Statistics. Prerequisite: Recommended: 30 units. Students cannot obtain credit for STAT 201 if they already have credit for - or are taking concurrently - STAT 101, 203, 205, 285, or any upper division STAT course. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Tim Swartz
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
Fr 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
OP01 TBD
STAT 270 - Introduction to Probability and Statistics (3)

Basic laws of probability, sample distributions. Introduction to statistical inference and applications. Prerequisite: or Corequisite: MATH 152 or 155 or 158, with a minimum grade of C-. Students wishing an intuitive appreciation of a broad range of statistical strategies may wish to take STAT 100 first. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Scott Pai
We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
Fr 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
OP01 TBD

and all of

PHYS 120 - Mechanics and Modern Physics (3)

A general calculus-based introduction to mechanics. Topics include translational and rotational motion, momentum, energy, gravitation, and selected topics in modern physics. Prerequisite: BC Principles of Physics 12 or PHYS 100 or equivalent, with a minimum grade of C-. This prerequisite may be waived, at the discretion of the department, as determined by the student's performance on a regularly scheduled PHYS 100 final exam. Please consult the physics advisor for further details. Corequisite: MATH 150 or 151 or 154. Recommended Corequisite: PHYS 132. Students with credit for PHYS 101, 125 or 140 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

PHYS 121 - Optics, Electricity and Magnetism (3)

A general calculus-based introduction to electricity, magnetism and optics. Topics include electricity, magnetism, simple circuits, optics and topics from applied physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 120 or 125 or 140, with a minimum grade of C-, or PHYS 101 with a minimum grade of B. Corequisite: MATH 152 or 155. Recommended Corequisite: PHYS 133. Students with credit for PHYS 102, 126 or 141 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Sarah Johnson
Mo, We, Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D101 We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D102 We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D103 We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D104 We 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D105 Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
D106 Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
PHYS 132 - Physics Laboratory I (1)

Introduction to experimental physics with an emphasis on measurement and experimental design. Includes elementary experiments in mechanics designed to support and enrich conceptual learning. Corequisite: PHYS 101 or 120 or 125. Students with credit for PHYS 140 may not take PHYS 132 for further credit. Quantitative.

PHYS 133 - Physics Laboratory II (1)

Introduction to experimental physics with an emphasis on measurement and experimental design. Includes elementary experiments in electromagnetism and optics designed to support and enrich conceptual learning. Prerequisite: PHYS 132 or 140 or ENSC 120 (no substitutions), with a minimum grade of C-. Corequisite: PHYS 102 or 121 or 126. Students with credit for PHYS 141 may not take PHYS 133 for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
LA01 Simin Bagheri Najmi
Th 2:30 PM – 6:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby

or all of

PHYS 125 - Mechanics and Special Relativity (3)

An enriched course in mechanics for students with good preparation in physics and mathematics. Special relativity and classical topics such as translational and rotational dynamics and conservation laws will be given a much more sophisticated treatment than in our other first-year courses. Prerequisite: Permission of the department. Corequisite: MATH 151. Recommended Corequisite: PHYS 132. Students with credit for PHYS 101, 120 or PHYS 140 may not take PHYS 125 for further credit. Quantitative.

PHYS 126 - Electricity, Magnetism and Light (3)

An enriched course in electromagnetism for students with good preparation in physics and mathematics. Classical topics such as waves, electricity and magnetism, as well as wave particle duality and the birth of Quantum Mechanics, will be given a much more sophisticated treatment than in our other first year courses. Prerequisite: PHYS 125 or permission of the department. Corequisite: MATH 152. Recommended Corequisite: PHYS 133. Students with credit in PHYS 102, 121 or 141 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

PHYS 132 - Physics Laboratory I (1)

Introduction to experimental physics with an emphasis on measurement and experimental design. Includes elementary experiments in mechanics designed to support and enrich conceptual learning. Corequisite: PHYS 101 or 120 or 125. Students with credit for PHYS 140 may not take PHYS 132 for further credit. Quantitative.

PHYS 133 - Physics Laboratory II (1)

Introduction to experimental physics with an emphasis on measurement and experimental design. Includes elementary experiments in electromagnetism and optics designed to support and enrich conceptual learning. Prerequisite: PHYS 132 or 140 or ENSC 120 (no substitutions), with a minimum grade of C-. Corequisite: PHYS 102 or 121 or 126. Students with credit for PHYS 141 may not take PHYS 133 for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
LA01 Simin Bagheri Najmi
Th 2:30 PM – 6:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby

or both of

PHYS 140 - Studio Physics - Mechanics and Modern Physics (4)

A general calculus-based introduction to mechanics taught in an integrated lecture-laboratory environment. Topics include translational and rotational motion, momentum, energy, gravitation, and selected topics in modern physics. Prerequisite: BC Principles of Physics 12, or PHYS 100 or equivalent, with a minimum grade of C-. Corequisite: MATH 150 or 151 or 154. Students with credit for PHYS 125 or 120 or 101 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

PHYS 141 - Studio Physics - Optics, Electricity and Magnetism (4)

A general calculus-based introduction to electricity, magnetism and optics taught in an integrated lecture-laboratory environment. Topics include electricity, magnetism, simple circuits, optics and topics from applied physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 120 or PHYS 125 or PHYS 140, with a minimum grade of C-, or PHYS 101 with a minimum grade of B. Corequisite: MATH 152 or MATH 155. Students with credit for PHYS 126 or 121 or 102 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

Upper Division Requirements

Students will complete a minimum of 42 units including all of

CHEM 316 - Introductory Instrumental Analysis (4)

Principles and applications of basic analytical instrumentation based upon spectroscopy, chromatography and electrochemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 215 and 260, both with a minimum grade of C-, or permission of the Department. Quantitative.

CHEM 317 - Analytical Environmental Chemistry (2)

Principles and applications of the methodologies of analytical chemistry employed in the determination of substances in air, water, and soil, with particular emphasis upon sampling and sample preparation. Prerequisite: CHEM 316 and 371, both with a minimum grade of C-. Corequisite: CHEM 372. Quantitative.

CHEM 332 - The Chemistry of Transition Metals (3)

The synthesis and characterization of classical and organometallic complexes of the transition metals, and their physical and chemical properties. Prerequisite: CHEM 230, 236W and 260, all with a minimum grade of C-, or permission of the Department. Quantitative.

CHEM 360 - Thermodynamics and Chemical Kinetics (3)

Elements of physical chemistry from the macroscopic point of view. Thermodynamics, and its applications to chemical equilibrium. Chemical kinetics and reaction rate theories. Prerequisite: CHEM 260 with a minimum grade of C-. Recommended: MATH 251. MBB 323 will be accepted in lieu of CHEM 360. Quantitative.

CHEM 371 - Chemistry of the Aqueous Environment (3)

An introduction to chemical processes in the aqueous environment. Quantitative treatment of the variables determining the composition of natural systems. Chemistry of aqueous toxic agents, wastewater treatment, and related matters. Prerequisite: CHEM 281 and CHEM 360, both with a minimum grade of C-. Quantitative.

CHEM 372 - Chemistry of the Atmospheric Environment (3)

Quantitative treatment of chemical and physical processes in the atmospheric environment. Chemistry of the troposphere including air pollution and climate change. Chemistry of the stratosphere including ozone depletion. Environmental radioactivity. Current topics. Prerequisite: CHEM 281 and CHEM 360, both with a minimum grade of C-. Quantitative.

and 3 units of 400-level CHEM not including CHEM 481-5, CHEM 483-5 or CHEM 484-10

and 3 additional units of upper division EASC courses

and all of

EASC 306 - Field Geology II (3)

A 10-14 day field camp held after final exams in the spring term. Students will learn how to observe, record and interpret geological features, and will carry out geological mapping and analysis. Lectures on field methods, equipment and safety may precede the field camp. Field locations may vary from year to year. Prerequisite: Prerequisite/Corequisite: EASC 201, 204, 205, and 206. All with a grade of C- or better.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Derek Thorkelson
TBD
EASC 308 - Field Geology III (3)

A 10-14 day field school held at the end of the summer term. Students will observe and interpret sedimentary and glacial geomorphic features, investigate natural hazard mechanisms and become acquainted with environmental geoscience topics. Students will carry out geological, geotechnical and geophysical surveying and analysis. Field locations may vary from year to year. Prerequisite: EASC 201, 206 and 209W. Recommended: EASC 207. All with a grade of C- or better. Students with credit for EASC 406 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Shahin Dashtgard
TBD

and one of

EASC 310W - Paleontology (3)

Principles of classification, morphology and development of the major groups of animals and plants in the geological record; the paleoecologic significance of fossils. Prerequisite: EASC 210. Recommended: BISC 102. All with a grade of C- or better. Students with credit for EASC 203 or EASC 310 may not take this course for further credit. Writing.

EASC 315W - Geochemistry of Natural Waters (3)

Emphasis is on the fundamentals of water-rock interactions and the chemistry of natural waters, developing an understanding of the physical and chemical principles that govern the geochemistry of water within Earth's crust. Topics will include water sample collection and analysis, chemical thermodynamics, gas-water-rock interactions and geochemical modeling. The applications range from weathering and recharge to acid rock drainage and diagenesis. Prerequisite: CHEM 122 and 126. Corequisite or prerequisite: EASC 304. All with a grade of C- or better. Students with credit for EASC 412 and/or EASC 315 may not complete this course for further credit. Writing.

and one of

NUSC 341 - Introduction to Radiochemistry (3)

Brief description of the nucleus and its decays and reactions; interaction of radiation with matter; nuclear instrumentation; radioisotopes in chemistry; activation analysis and related analytical techniques; other applications of nuclear techniques; nuclear reactors and nuclear fusion. Prerequisite: Completion of 60 units in a science program, including first year calculus, chemistry and physics. Quantitative.

NUSC 344 - Nucleosynthesis and Distribution of the Elements (3)

Formation and distribution of the chemical elements in the early universe, in present stellar environments and in the solar system; elemental abundances and isotopic ratios; and radiometric chronology techniques. Prerequisite: Completion of 60 units in a science program, including first year calculus, chemistry and physics. Quantitative.

Environmental Geoscience Stream

Students who choose this stream will complete all of

EASC 304 - Hydrogeology (3)

An introduction to the basic concepts and principles governing the flow of groundwater in the subsurface environment. These are used to develop an understanding of aquifers and their physical properties, groundwater sustainability and management, and interaction of groundwater with surface water. In addition, as a foundation course in fluids in geologic media, this course has relevance to the oil and gas and mining industries, as well as to engineering applications such as dewatering. Prerequisite: EASC 101 and PHYS 102 or 121 or 126 or 141; and 12 additional units in earth sciences, physical geography or environmental science. All with a grade of C- or better. Quantitative.

EASC 403 - Quaternary Geology (3)

Stratigraphy and history of the Quaternary Period with emphasis on glaciation, glacial sediments, and landforms. The course includes several 1-day trips and at least one 3-day trip. Prerequisite: EASC 201, EASC 209W or GEOG 213, and EASC 308. All with a grade of C- or better.

Geology Stream

Students who choose this stream will complete all of

EASC 301 - Igneous Petrology (3)

Integrated theoretical and practical investigation of igneous rocks. Topics include melt generation, ascent and modification of magma, and solidification of magma in plutonic and volcanic environments. Emphasis will be placed on mineralogy, geochemistry and petrography. Relations between magmatic and tectonic processes will be explored. Prerequisite: EASC 205 and 208. All with a grade of C- or better.

EASC 302 - Sedimentary Petrology (3)

Description and classification, field and microscopic identification of sedimentary rocks; petrogenesis and paleoenvironmental reconstruction. Prerequisite: STAT 201 or 270, EASC 201 and 205. All with a grade of C- or better.

Upper Division Electives

Upper division units must total a minimum of 44 upper division units.

University Degree Requirements

Students must also satisfy University degree requirements for degree completion.

Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements

Students admitted to Simon Fraser University beginning in the fall 2006 term must meet writing, quantitative and breadth requirements as part of any degree program they may undertake. See Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements for university-wide information.

WQB Graduation Requirements

A grade of C- or better is required to earn W, Q or B credit

Requirement

Units

Notes
W - Writing

6

Must include at least one upper division course, taken at Simon Fraser University within the student’s major subject
Q - Quantitative

6

Q courses may be lower or upper division
B - Breadth

18

Designated Breadth Must be outside the student’s major subject, and may be lower or upper division
6 units Social Sciences: B-Soc
6 units Humanities: B-Hum
6 units Sciences: B-Sci

6

Additional Breadth 6 units outside the student’s major subject (may or may not be B-designated courses, and will likely help fulfil individual degree program requirements)

Students choosing to complete a joint major, joint honours, double major, two extended minors, an extended minor and a minor, or two minors may satisfy the breadth requirements (designated or not designated) with courses completed in either one or both program areas.

 

Residency Requirements and Transfer Credit

  • At least half of the program's total units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.
  • At least two thirds of the program's total upper division units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.

Elective Courses

In addition to the courses listed above, students should consult an academic advisor to plan the remaining required elective courses.