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Cognitive Science Program | Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Simon Fraser University Calendar | Spring 2022

Cognitive Science Major

Bachelor of Arts

Cognitive science is the study of the mind and its processes, including consciousness, language, learning, information processing, and decision making. At SFU this study is explored at the intersection of Linguistics, Psychology, Computing Science, and Philosophy. Through a variety of scientific and philosophical approaches, this interdisciplinary approach seeks a broader and deeper understanding of cognition.

Students in our program customize their individual programs within a set of required and recommended courses according to their developing interests. Faculty associated with our program and the Cognitive Science community at SFU contribute individually and collaboratively to a wide range of research areas.

Declaration Requirements

To be declared into the program, students must complete:

COGS 100 - Exploring the Mind (3)

This course provides a basic integrative overview of how cognitive science aspires to integrate the empirical findings, theories, and methods of psychology, neuroscience, linguistics, computing science and philosophy. Prerequisite: Open to all students. Students with credit for COGS 200 may not take COGS 100 for further credit. Breadth-Hum/Social Sci/Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Endre Begby
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
Fr 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
EDB 7618, Burnaby
EDB 7618, Burnaby
D900 Jeremy Turner
Mo 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SRYC 3090, Surrey
SRYC 3090, Surrey

Program Requirements

Within the minimum 120 units needed for the BA, students complete the required courses in the sections below.

Lower Division Requirements

Introductory Courses

Students are required to complete the following:

COGS 100 - Exploring the Mind (3)

This course provides a basic integrative overview of how cognitive science aspires to integrate the empirical findings, theories, and methods of psychology, neuroscience, linguistics, computing science and philosophy. Prerequisite: Open to all students. Students with credit for COGS 200 may not take COGS 100 for further credit. Breadth-Hum/Social Sci/Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Endre Begby
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
Fr 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
EDB 7618, Burnaby
EDB 7618, Burnaby
D900 Jeremy Turner
Mo 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SRYC 3090, Surrey
SRYC 3090, Surrey

and the following requirements.

Computing Science

CMPT 120 - Introduction to Computing Science and Programming I (3)

An elementary introduction to computing science and computer programming, suitable for students with little or no programming background. Students will learn fundamental concepts and terminology of computing science, acquire elementary skills for programming in a high-level language, e.g. Python. The students will be exposed to diverse fields within, and applications of computing science. Topics will include: pseudocode; data types and control structures; fundamental algorithms; recursion; reading and writing files; measuring performance of algorithms; debugging tools; basic terminal navigation using shell commands. Treatment is informal and programming is presented as a problem-solving tool. Prerequisite: BC Math 12 or equivalent is recommended. Students with credit for CMPT 102, 128, 130 or 166 may not take this course for further credit. Students who have taken CMPT 125, 129, 130 or 135 first may not then take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Diana Cukierman
Mo, We 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
Fr 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
SWH 10081, Burnaby
SSCB 9201, Burnaby
D200 Diana Cukierman
Mo, We, Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 3520, Burnaby
D400 John Edgar
Mo, We, Fr 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
SRYE 1002, Surrey
D401 Mo 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SRYE 4013, Surrey
D402 Mo 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SRYE 4024, Surrey
D403 Mo 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SRYE 4013, Surrey
D405 Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SRYE 4013, Surrey
D406 Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SRYE 4024, Surrey
D408 Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SRYE 4024, Surrey

and

CMPT 125 - Introduction to Computing Science and Programming II (3)

A rigorous introduction to computing science and computer programming, suitable for students who already have some background in computing science and programming. Intended for students who will major in computing science or a related program. Topics include: memory management; fundamental algorithms; formally analyzing the running time of algorithms; abstract data types and elementary data structures; object-oriented programming and software design; specification and program correctness; reading and writing files; debugging tools; shell commands. Prerequisite: CMPT 120 or CMPT 130, with a minimum grade of C-. Students with credit for CMPT 126, 129, 135 or CMPT 200 or higher may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Victor Cheung
We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
Fr 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 3182, Burnaby
SSCB 9201, Burnaby
D101 Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
ASB 9838, Burnaby
D102 Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
ASB 9838, Burnaby
D103 Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
ASB 9838, Burnaby
D104 Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
ASB 9838, Burnaby
D105 Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
ASB 9838, Burnaby
D106 Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
ASB 9838, Burnaby
D107 Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
ASB 9838, Burnaby
D108 Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
ASB 9838, Burnaby
D200 Igor Shinkar
Mo 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
We 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
SSCC 9001, Burnaby
SSCB 9201, Burnaby
D201 Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
ASB 9838, Burnaby
D202 Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
ASB 9838, Burnaby
D203 Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
ASB 9838, Burnaby
D204 Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
ASB 9838, Burnaby
D205 Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
ASB 9838, Burnaby
D206 Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
ASB 9838, Burnaby
D207 Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
ASB 9838, Burnaby
D208 Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
ASB 9838, Burnaby

Additionally students who choose intermediate level computing science, must complete

MACM 101 - Discrete Mathematics I (3)

Introduction to counting, induction, automata theory, formal reasoning, modular arithmetic. Prerequisite: BC Math 12 (or equivalent), or any of MATH 100, 150, 151, 154, 157. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Milan Tofiloski
Tu 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 3182, Burnaby
AQ 3182, Burnaby
D101 Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 2523, Burnaby
D102 Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
EDB 9651, Burnaby
D103 Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
BLU 11901, Burnaby
D104 Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
BLU 10901, Burnaby
D105 Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
EDB 9651, Burnaby
D106 Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5009, Burnaby
D107 Th 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
WMC 2533, Burnaby
D108 Th 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 5047, Burnaby
D200 Harinder Khangura
Mo 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SRYE 1002, Surrey
SRYE 1002, Surrey
D201 Th 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SRYE 3024, Surrey
D202 Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SRYE 3024, Surrey
D203 Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SRYE 4013, Surrey
D204 Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SRYE 3024, Surrey
D205 Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SRYE 4013, Surrey
D207 Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SRYE 3024, Surrey
D208 Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SRYE 4013, Surrey

Linguistics

LING 220 - Introduction to Linguistics (3)

Explores how language works. Introduces students to the systematic nature of language by exploring the patterns of sounds, words, sentences and meanings in English and other languages. Develops problem-solving and critical thinking skills through hands-on training in pattern recognition and language data analysis. Open to all students. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
A100 TBD
A330 TBD
D100 Claudia Wong
TBD
D101 Tu 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 4150, Burnaby
D102 We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
RCB 6101, Burnaby
D103 We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 4125, Burnaby
D104 We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 2122, Burnaby
D105 We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5028, Burnaby
D106 Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5027, Burnaby
D107 Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 4115, Burnaby

Philosophy

PHIL 100W - Knowledge and Reality (3)

An introduction to some of the central problems of philosophy. Topics to be discussed include the different theories of reality; the nature and sources of knowledge, truth, evidence, and reason; the justification of belief and knowledge about the universe. These topics and problems will be considered as they arise in the context of issues such as: relativism versus absolutism; the existence of God; personal identity; the nature of the mind and its relation to the body; free will and determinism; the possibility of moral knowledge. Open to all students. Students with credit for PHIL 100 may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Thomas Donaldson
Mo, We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SWH 10081, Burnaby
D101 Mo 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
AQ 5029, Burnaby
D102 Mo 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB 7105, Burnaby
D103 Mo 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB 6100, Burnaby
D104 Mo 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D105 Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5015, Burnaby
D106 Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5015, Burnaby
D107 Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5029, Burnaby
D108 Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D109 We 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
RCB 8106, Burnaby
D110 We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
WMC 3531, Burnaby
D111 We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5020, Burnaby
D112 We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5029, Burnaby
D113 We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
D114 Mo 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 7105, Burnaby
D115 Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5051, Burnaby
D116 We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5026, Burnaby
D900 Brian Thomas
We 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SRYC 5100, Surrey
PHIL 110 - Introduction to Logic and Reasoning (3)

The aim of this course is to familiarize students with fundamental techniques of correct reasoning. Special attention is given to the methods of logic in particular, and to their role in the discovery of truth not only within science and philosophy but within all forms of rational enquiry. Open to all students. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Nicolas Fillion
Mo, We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 3181, Burnaby
D101 Mo 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5051, Burnaby
D102 Mo 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 4115, Burnaby
D103 Mo 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5027, Burnaby
D104 Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5027, Burnaby
D105 Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5051, Burnaby
D106 Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 2260, Burnaby
D110 We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
WMC 3251, Burnaby
D111 We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
WMC 2260, Burnaby
D900 Simon Pollon
Th 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SRYC 3240, Surrey

Psychology

PSYC 100 - Introduction to Psychology I (3)

Acquaints the student with the major issues in contemporary psychology and considers the historical antecedents. Special attention is given to questions of methodology and research design in psychology. Topics in physiological psychology, perception, learning and motivation are considered. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 George Alder
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
PSYC 102 - Introduction to Psychology II (3)

Acquaints the student with major issues in contemporary psychology and considers their historical antecedents. Topics in learning, cognition, social psychology and abnormal psychology are considered. Recommended: PSYC 100 is recommended but not required. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Russell Day
Mo, We 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby

Intermediate Courses

Students complete

COGS 200 - Foundations in Cognitive Science (3)

An introduction to major empirical methods and theoretical frameworks for exploring the mind that examines some of the foundational debates that have fueled investigations over the past fifty years. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, the course illustrates how a convergence of ideas from psychology, philosophy, linguistics, and computer science has led to deep explanations of a range of cognitive science topics. Prerequisite: COGS 100.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Shawn Tan
Mo 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 3510, Burnaby
AQ 5038, Burnaby

and the requirements for at least three of the four disciplines shown below.

Computing Science

CMPT 225 - Data Structures and Programming (3)

Introduction to a variety of practical and important data structures and methods for implementation and for experimental and analytical evaluation. Topics include: stacks, queues and lists; search trees; hash tables and algorithms; efficient sorting; object-oriented programming; time and space efficiency analysis; and experimental evaluation. Prerequisite: (MACM 101 and (CMPT 125, CMPT 129 or CMPT 135)) or (ENSC 251 and ENSC 252), all with a minimum grade of C-. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 John Edgar
We 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
Fr 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SRYE 1002, Surrey
SRYE 1002, Surrey
D101 Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SRYE 4024, Surrey
D102 Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SRYE 4013, Surrey
D103 Tu 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SRYE 4024, Surrey
D105 Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SRYE 4024, Surrey
D107 Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SRYE 4024, Surrey
D200 Anne Lavergne
Mo, We, Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SSCB 9200, Burnaby
D201 Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
ASB 9838, Burnaby
D202 Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
ASB 9838, Burnaby
D203 Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
ASB 9838, Burnaby
D204 Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
ASB 9838, Burnaby
D205 Tu 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
ASB 9838, Burnaby
D206 Tu 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
ASB 9838, Burnaby
D207 Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
ASB 9838, Burnaby
D208 Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
ASB 9838, Burnaby

Linguistics

LING 282W - Writing for Linguistics (3)

Develops skills in language analysis by focusing on reading and writing of linguistic argumentation. Explores the foundations of such argumentation in the core areas of linguistics. Students read and discuss primary literature in linguistics in order to understand how to formulate hypotheses and evaluate them. They also learn how to use writing to construct their own solutions to challenging linguistic problems. Prerequisite: LING 220. Writing/Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D200 Panayiotis Pappas
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SWH 10051, Burnaby
SWH 10051, Burnaby
SWH 10051, Burnaby
SWH 10051, Burnaby
SWH 10051, Burnaby
SWH 10051, Burnaby
SWH 10051, Burnaby
SWH 10051, Burnaby

Philosophy

PHIL 201 - Epistemology (3)

A critical overview of recent accounts of the nature and scope of human knowledge and of justified or rational belief, and of philosophical issues that these accounts are intended to address. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 100W (or equivalent), 120W (or equivalent), 121, 144, 150, 151, or COGS 100. Students who have taken PHIL 301 cannot take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Thomas Donaldson
Tu 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
BLU 10031, Burnaby
or PHIL 203 - Metaphysics (3)

An examination of central problems of metaphysics such as space and time, universals and particulars, substance, identity and individuation and personal identity. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 100W (or equivalent), 120W (or equivalent), 121, 144, 150, 151, or COGS 100.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 David Heide
Mo 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 3533, Burnaby
WMC 3253, Burnaby

Psychology

PSYC 201W - Introduction to Research Methods in Psychology (4)

An introduction to the procedures used in psychological research, and to the logic underlying them. Topics include the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches to research, the formulation of testable questions, the control of extraneous influences, the measurement of effects, and the drawing of valid conclusions from empirical evidence. Provides a background for senior psychology courses since it offers a basis for the critical evaluation and conduct of research. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 or 102. Students with credit for PSYC 201 may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100 Shawn Tan
Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
D101 Tu 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5046, Burnaby
D102 Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5046, Burnaby
D103 Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5048, Burnaby
D104 Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
TASC2 7201, Burnaby
D105 Tu 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D106 Mo 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 4125, Burnaby
D107 Mo 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D108 We 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5028, Burnaby
D109 We 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 2268, Burnaby
D110 We 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 6101, Burnaby
D111 We 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 2523, Burnaby
D112 We 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 5015, Burnaby
D113 Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5020, Burnaby
D114 We 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5009, Burnaby
PSYC 221 - Introduction to Cognitive Psychology (3)

Introduction to the study of cognitive and perceptual processes. Topics include memory, perception, attention, language, mental imagery, creativity, judgment and decision-making, and an introduction to cognitive disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, dyslexia, aphasia and attention-deficit disorder. Prerequisite: PSYC 100.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Th 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
PSYC 280 - Introduction to Biological Psychology (3)

Surveys the major areas in biological psychology. Topics include the basics of neuroanatomy and nerve cell function, the behavioural and physiological effects of drugs and hormones in the nervous system, evolutionary perspectives on the brain and behaviour, and the biopsychology of vision, the chemical senses, hearing, movement, biological rhythms, sex, and cognitive processes. Prerequisite: PSYC 100. Recommended: BISC 101. Breadth-Science.

Section Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education

Upper Division Requirements

Students complete at least 33 upper division units, including:

COGS 300 - Selected Topics in Cognitive Science (3)

An interdisciplinary exploration of recent work on some special topic in cognitive science (such as vision, reasoning, connectionism, etc.). Prerequisite: 60 credits.

COGS 310 - Consciousness (3)

Explores the topic of consciousness, often called "the last great mystery of science," focusing on current scientific theories and empirical investigations from philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience. Prerequisite: COGS 100 and 200 (or permission of the instructor).

or COGS 315 - Formal Methods (3)

A survey of formal methods used in philosophy, cognitive science, linguistics and related disciplines. Topics will include some of the following: prepositional logic, predicate logic, formal syntax, formal semantics, the probability calculus, decision theory, game theory and formal causal modeling. Prerequisite: One of: PHIL 110, 210, 310, 314, MACM 101, BUEC 232 or STAT 270. Students with credit for PHIL 315 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 4130, Burnaby
WMC 2200, Burnaby

and at least 27 upper division units from the disciplines below, including at least one course from three of the four disciplines. (Note: COGS 310 or COGS 315 may be counted toward upper division units if the student takes both.)

Computing Science

CMPT 310 - Artificial Intelligence Survey (3)

Provides a unified discussion of the fundamental approaches to the problems in artificial intelligence. The topics considered are: representational typology and search methods; game playing, heuristic programming; pattern recognition and classification; theorem-proving; question-answering systems; natural language understanding; computer vision. Prerequisite: CMPT 225 and (MACM 101 or (ENSC 251 and ENSC 252)), all with a minimum grade of C-. Students with credit for CMPT 410 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E100 Hang Ma
Nafiseh Sedaghat
Mo, We, Fr 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCK 9500, Burnaby
CMPT 363 - User Interface Design (3)

This course provides a comprehensive study of user interface design. Topics include: goals and principles of UI design (systems engineering and human factors), historical perspective, current paradigms (widget-based, mental model, graphic design, ergonomics, metaphor, constructivist/iterative approach, and visual languages) and their evaluation, existing tools and packages (dialogue models, event-based systems, prototyping), future paradigms, and the social impact of UI. Prerequisite: CMPT 225 with a minimum grade of C-.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Victor Cheung
Mo 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SRYE 3016, Surrey
SRYE 3016, Surrey
D200 Paul Hibbitts
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
CMPT 365 - Multimedia Systems (3)

Multimedia systems design, multimedia hardware and software, issues in effectively representing, processing, and retrieving multimedia data such as text, graphics, sound and music, image and video. Prerequisite: CMPT 225 with a minimum grade of C-.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Jiangchuan Liu
Mo, We, Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SSCC 9002, Burnaby
CMPT 383 - Comparative Programming Languages (3)

Various concepts and principles underlying the design and use of modern programming languages are considered in the context of procedural, object-oriented, functional and logic programming languages. Topics include data and control structuring constructs, facilities for modularity and data abstraction, polymorphism, syntax, and formal semantics. Prerequisite: CMPT 225 and (MACM 101 or (ENSC 251 and ENSC 252)), all with a minimum grade of C-.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Yuepeng Wang
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SSCK 9500, Burnaby
SSCK 9500, Burnaby
CMPT 384 - Symbolic Computing (3)

This course considers modelling and programming techniques appropriate for symbolic data domains such as mathematical expressions, logical formulas, grammars and programming languages. Topics include recursive and functional programming style, grammar-based data abstraction, simplification and reduction transformations, conversions to canonical form, environment data structures and interpreters, metaprogramming, pattern matching and theorem proving. Prerequisite: CMPT 225 and (MACM 101 or (ENSC 251 and ENSC 252)), all with a minimum grade of C-.

CMPT 411 - Knowledge Representation (3)

Formal and foundational issues dealing with the representation of knowledge in artificial intelligence systems are covered. Questions of semantics, incompleteness, non-monotonicity and others will be examined. As well, particular approaches, such as procedural or semantic network, may be discussed. Prerequisite: Completion of nine units in Computing Science upper division courses or, in exceptional cases, permission of the instructor.

CMPT 412 - Computational Vision (3)

Computational approaches to image understanding will be discussed in relation to theories about the operation of the human visual system and with respect to practical applications in robotics. Topics will include edge detection, shape from shading, stereopsis, optical flow, Fourier methods, gradient space, three-dimensional object representation and constraint satisfaction. Prerequisite: MATH 152 with a minimum grade of C-, and nine units in Computing upper division courses or permission of the instructor.

CMPT 413 - Computational Linguistics (3)

This course examines the theoretical and applied problems of constructing and modelling systems, which aim to extract and represent the meaning of natural language sentences or of whole discourses, but drawing on contributions from the fields of linguistics, cognitive psychology, artificial intelligence and computing science. Prerequisite: Completion of nine units in Computing Science upper division courses or, in exceptional cases, permission of the instructor.

CMPT 414 - Model-Based Computer Vision (3)

This course covers various topics in computer vision with the emphasis on the model-based approach. Main subjects include 2-D and 3-D representations, matching, constraint relaxation, model-based vision systems. State-of-the-art robot vision systems will be used extensively as study cases. The solid modelling and CAD aspects of this course should also interest students of computer graphics. Prerequisite: MATH 152 with a minimum grade of C- and nine units in CMPT upper division courses, or permission of the instructor.

CMPT 417 - Intelligent Systems (3)

Intelligent Systems using modern constraint programming and heuristic search methods. A survey of this rapidly advancing technology as applied to scheduling, planning, design and configuration. An introduction to constraint programming, heuristic search, constructive (backtrack) search, iterative improvement (local) search, mixed-initiative systems and combinatorial optimization. Prerequisite: CMPT 225 with a minimum grade of C-.

CMPT 419 - Special Topics in Artificial Intelligence (3) *

Current topics in artificial intelligence depending on faculty and student interest.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Ke Li
We 5:30 PM – 7:20 PM
Fr 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
SWH 10081, Burnaby
SWH 10081, Burnaby
D200 Angelica Lim
Mo 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 3153, Burnaby
AQ 3153, Burnaby

Linguistics

LING 321 - Phonology (3)

An overview of theoretical principles in phonology. Prerequisite: LING 282W; or LING 221 and any lower division W course.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 John Alderete
Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
WMC 2532, Burnaby
RCB 6125, Burnaby
LING 322 - Syntax (3)

Introduces theories of sentence structure. Prerequisite: LING 282W; or LING 222 and any lower division W course.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Nancy Hedberg
Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 6125, Burnaby
LING 323 - Morphology (3)

Word structure in natural languages and its relationship to phonological and syntactic levels of grammar. Prerequisite: One of LING 301W, 309W or 482W.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Trevor Block
Tu 8:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SWH 10061, Burnaby
LING 324 - Semantics (3)

Basic formal aspects of meaning (e.g. compositional semantics, truth conditional semantics and quantification in natural language) and how they are distinguished from pragmatic aspects of meaning. Prerequisite: LING 282W; or LING 222 and any lower division W course. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Nancy Hedberg
Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 6125, Burnaby
LING 330 - Phonetics (3)

A survey of methods of speech sound description and transcription. Prerequisite: LING 282W; or LING 221 and any lower division W course.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Keith Leung
We 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
BLU 10031, Burnaby
LING 350 - First Language Acquisition (3)

Introduction to the study of language acquisition from the point of view of linguistic structure. Prerequisite: One of LING 301W, 309W or 482W. Students who have taken LING 250 may not take this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
E100 Dean Mellow
Tu 5:30 PM – 7:20 PM
Th 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
WMC 2507, Burnaby
WMC 3250, Burnaby
LING 400 - Formal Linguistics (3)

Formal systems and their relation to linguistic methods and theory. Topics include the mathematical properties of natural languages, and rigorously defined frameworks for linguistic analysis and their formal properties. Prerequisite: LING 322. Recommended: PHIL 210. Quantitative.

LING 415 - Neurolinguistics (3)

Explores language as a system of the human brain, including specific topics such as the neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of language; language production, perception and processing; bilingualism, language learning and brain plasticity; and aphasia, dyslexia, deafness and sign languages. Prerequisite: 12 units of upper division linguistic courses.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Yue Wang
We 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 2531, Burnaby
LING 480 - Topics in Linguistics I (3) *

Investigation of a selected area of linguistic research. This course may be repeated once for credit if the topic is different. Prerequisite: Requirements will vary according to the topic offered.

LING 481 - Topics in Linguistics II (3) *

Investigation of a selected area of linguistic research. This course may be repeated once for credit if the subject is different. Prerequisite: Requirements will vary according to the topic offered.

Philosophy

PHIL 302 - Topics in Epistemology and Metaphysics (3) *

An exploration of philosophical issues concerning, e.g.: causation, time, modality, or the self; the realism/nominalism or realism/idealism debate; relativism; the concept of truth; naturalized epistemology; global epistemological skepticism or perhaps a 'local' form of skepticism such as skepticism about induction or about sensory belief. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: PHIL 201 or 203.

PHIL 310 - Logic, Proofs and Set Theory (3)

An advanced introduction to the logical techniques and concepts required for the construction of proofs, including the fundamental principles of set theory and concepts such as set, relation, function, sequence, orderings and others. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 110, 210, 314, 315, or MACM 101; or a minimum of 12 units in MATH. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Nicolas Fillion
Tu 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
RCB 8100, Burnaby
PHIL 314 - Topics in Logic (3) *

An examination of one or more topics such as: alethic modal logic, applied modal logic, classical metatheory, and non-classical logic. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: One of PHIL 110, 210, 310, 315, or MACM 101, or with the approval of the instructor or department.

PHIL 341 - Philosophy of Science (3)

A study of the nature of scientific enquiry, classificatory systems, laws and theories, the role of observation in science, the demarcation between science and non-science, causality, the status of theoretical constructs, and teleological explanation. Prerequisite: Either one of: PHIL 201 or 203; or both of PHIL 100W (or equivalent) and COGS 200.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Simon Pollon
Tu 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
RCB 7100, Burnaby
PHIL 343 - Topics in the Philosophy of Mind (3)

A study of theories of the mind, consciousness, and human action. Students may repeat this course for further credit under a different topic. Prerequisite: Either one of: PHIL 201 or 203; or both of PHIL 100W (or equivalent) and COGS 200.

PHIL 344 - Topics in the Philosophy of Language (3)

An introduction to the major philosophic theories of language. Topics to be considered include the relationship between language and mind, language and the world, language and society. Students may repeat this course for further credit under a different topic. Prerequisite: Either one of: PHIL 201 or 203; or both of PHIL 100W (or equivalent) and COGS 200.

PHIL 455W - Contemporary Issues in Epistemology and Metaphysics (4) *

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Two 300 division PHIL courses. Writing.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
B100 Holly Andersen
Fr 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 3250, Burnaby
PHIL 467W - Seminar II (4) *

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Two 300 division PHIL courses. Writing.

Psychology

PSYC 303 - Perception (3)

An introduction to the study of perceptual processes with an emphasis on seeing and hearing. Topics include the perception of features, objects, motion, depth, time, visual illusions, and individual differences in perceptual ability. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 221 (or 335).

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Tom Spalek
We 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SWH 10061, Burnaby
PSYC 325 - Learning and Memory (3)

Examination of the phenomena of memory and the retention and reproduction of information. Considers the conditions and principles of retention and recall in short- and long-term memory. Prerequisite: PSYC 201W and PSYC 221 (or PSYC 280).

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Brianne Kent
Fr 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 3181, Burnaby
PSYC 330 - Attention (3)

Survey the different aspects of paying attention. Topics include the effects of selective and divided attention on perceptual and cognitive function; the role of attention in human performance; attentional dysfunction and attention-deficit disorder; and the development of attentional capacity across the life span from newborns to the elderly. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 221.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Richard Wright
Tu 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby
PSYC 381 - Behavioural Endocrinology (3)

Examines the ways in which hormones influence the nervous system, regulating essential behaviours such as eating, drinking, sex, parenting, sleep, emotional behaviour and cognitive processes. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 280.

PSYC 382 - Cognitive Neuroscience (3)

Examines the neurophysiological bases of cognitive and perceptual phenomena such as memory, attention, language, thinking, imagery, vision, audition, and sensory processes. The study of human cognitive performance with measurement techniques such as ERP, PET, and MRI is also discussed. Prerequisite: PSYC 201, 221, and 280.

PSYC 383 - Psychopharmacology (3)

A survey of how psychoactive drugs affect brain function to alter consciousness and behaviour. Topics will include cellular effects of drugs that affect the central nervous system and discussions of the psychological and social effects of those drug-induced changes in the brain. Research on drug abuse and addictions and means of treating them will be covered. Historical, social and legal aspects of non-medical drug use will be discussed, as will the use of medications for the treatment of anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, dementias and other psychological disorders. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 280.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Evan Caldbick
Tu 6:00 PM – 9:00 PM
BLU 9660, Burnaby
PSYC 385 - Evolution and Psychology (3)

Topics such as altruism, parental care, mate choice, sex differences in behaviour, aggression, dominance and territoriality are considered from an evolutionary perspective. The role of heredity and environment in the development of these behaviours is also discussed. Prerequisite: PSYC 201W.

PSYC 388 - Biological Rhythms and Sleep (3)

Behaviour and physiology are regulated by biological clocks, which function to synchronize the organism optimally with its environment. In this course we examine the adaptive role of clocks in animal behaviour, the neural and endocrine mechanisms of daily, monthly and yearly rhythms, and the relevance of clocks, rhythms and sleep to human performance and psychopathology. We will also consider the mechanisms and functions of sleep states. Prerequisite: PSYC 201 and 280.

Section Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
PSYC 389 - Emotion and Motivation (3)

Explores the psychology and neuroscience of the related concepts of emotion and motivation by conducting a contemporary survey of the key psychology and behavioural studies carried out in the burgeoning area of affective science. Prerequisite: PSYC 201. Students with credit for PSYC 391 Emotion and Motivation may not take PSYC 389 for further credit.

* Students seeking to have these courses satisfy program requirements must seek approval from the Undergraduate Advisor based on the particular topic of the course.

Directed Studies Courses

Additional upper division electives to complete the minimum 45 upper division units requirement for the BA degree can include:

COGS 350 - Directed Readings (3)

Independent readings in a selected field of cognitive science study culminating in a written report. To register, a student must (i) have prior written agreement from a Cognitive Science Program Faculty Member or Associate Member who will act as a research supervisor, and (ii) permission of the Director. Prerequisite: COGS 200, 60 units, and permission of the Director.

COGS 380 - Directed Research (3)

Directed study aimed at gaining knowledge and practical experience in designing, conducting, analyzing, and documenting cognitive science research. To register, a student must (i) have prior written agreement from a Cognitive Science Program Faculty Member or Associate Member who will act as a research supervisor; and (ii) permission of the Director. Prerequisite: COGS 200, 60 units, and permission of the Director.

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Degree Requirements

For all bachelor of arts (BA) programs, students complete 120 units, which includes

  • at least 60 units that must be completed at Simon Fraser University
  • at least 45 upper division units, of which at least 30 upper division units must be completed at Simon Fraser University
  • at least 60 units (including 21 upper division units) in Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences courses
  • satisfaction of the writing, quantitative, and breadth requirements
  • an overall cumulative grade point average (CGPA) and upper division CGPA of at least 2.0, and minimum CGPA and upper division CGPA of at least 2.0 across all units attempted in each subject that is a major, a joint major, a minor, or an extended minor. FASS Departments may define specific requirements for their respective programs.

Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements

Students admitted to Simon Fraser University beginning in the fall 2006 term must meet writing, quantitative and breadth requirements as part of any degree program they may undertake. See Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements for university-wide information.

WQB Graduation Requirements

A grade of C- or better is required to earn W, Q or B credit

Requirement

Units

Notes
W - Writing

6

Must include at least one upper division course, taken at Simon Fraser University within the student’s major subject
Q - Quantitative

6

Q courses may be lower or upper division
B - Breadth

18

Designated Breadth Must be outside the student’s major subject, and may be lower or upper division
6 units Social Sciences: B-Soc
6 units Humanities: B-Hum
6 units Sciences: B-Sci

6

Additional Breadth 6 units outside the student’s major subject (may or may not be B-designated courses, and will likely help fulfil individual degree program requirements)

Students choosing to complete a joint major, joint honours, double major, two extended minors, an extended minor and a minor, or two minors may satisfy the breadth requirements (designated or not designated) with courses completed in either one or both program areas.

 

Grade Requirements

In addition to the BA requirement that a student's cumulative grade point average (CGPA) and upper division grade point average (UD GPA) be 2.0 or highter for graduation, cognitive science grade point averages (cognitive science GPA and cognitive science upper division GPA) are calculated based on all the courses selected to satisfy the graduation requirements for a major, minor or honours. Cognitive science program GPAs (COGS CGPA and COGS UD GPA) of 2.0 or higher are required for program continuation.

Residency Requirements and Transfer Credit

  • At least half of the program's total units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.
  • At least two thirds of the program's total upper division units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.

Elective Courses

In addition to the courses listed above, students should consult an academic advisor to plan the remaining required elective courses.

Languages Other Than English

Those contemplating graduate work are advised to acquire a reading knowledge of at least one language other than English.