Please note:

To view the Fall 2021 Academic Calendar, go to www.sfu.ca/students/calendar/2021/fall.html.

School of Criminology | Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Simon Fraser University Calendar | Spring 2022

Criminology Honours

Bachelor of Arts

Program Declaration and Continuation

Students must first declare the Major. Students normally apply for the Criminology Honours program in the Spring term (February) and typically complete 104 total units with a minimum 3.00 CGPA prior to the start of the Honours program in the Fall term (September). Students may complete up to 8 additional units of the 104 during the Fall term. Students must complete and defend their theses in an Honours Symposium by the following April.

To continue in the honours program, students must maintain a 3.00 CGPA. Students whose CGPA falls below 3.00 cannot enroll in CRIM 499 and, therefore, cannot complete the program. Students whose CGPA falls below 2.25 cannot enroll in any upper division CRIM courses.

Program Requirements

This structured program for outstanding undergraduate students complements the Criminology major program and consists of two terms of advanced course work and supervised research. Honours students write and defend a short thesis.

Students complete a minimum of 120 units, including a minimum of 60 upper division units, as specified below with CGPAs in accordance with general and Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences graduation requirements including a minimum 3.00 CGPA.

Lower Division Requirements

60 units under group A, group B and general electives.

  • eight courses from group A with minimum C- grades
  • six courses from group B with minimum C- grades
  • an additional six courses of general electives

Group A Lower Division Requirements

All of

CRIM 101 - Introduction to Criminology (3)

Topics will include: examination of different terms and concepts commonly used in criminology, such as crime, delinquency, deviance, criminal, victim, rehabilitation and treatment. Criminology as a body of knowledge and as a profession. Position and subject matter of criminology. Relationship between criminology and other academic disciplines. Specificity of criminology. Relationship between theory and practice. History and evolution of criminological thought. Elements of continuity and discontinuity between classical and modern theories of criminality. Levels of explanations in criminology. Practical applications of criminology. The foundations of a modern criminal policy. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100 Bryan Kinney
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SSCC 9001, Burnaby
D101 We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SWH 10218, Burnaby
D102 We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SWH 10218, Burnaby
D103 We 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SWH 10218, Burnaby
D104 We 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SWH 10218, Burnaby
D105 We 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
SWH 10218, Burnaby
D106 We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 6100, Burnaby
D107 We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5029, Burnaby
D108 We 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5029, Burnaby
D109 We 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5029, Burnaby
D110 We 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 5027, Burnaby
D111 We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
D112 We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
D113 We 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
D114 We 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
D115 We 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
D116 We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
BLU 11911, Burnaby
D117 Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SWH 10218, Burnaby
D118 Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SWH 10218, Burnaby
D119 We 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
BLU 11911, Burnaby
D120 We 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
SWH 10075, Burnaby
D900 Zachary Rowan
Tu 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SRYC 2600, Surrey
D901 Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SRYC 2990, Surrey
D902 Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SRYC 2990, Surrey
D903 Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SRYC 2990, Surrey
D904 Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SRYC 2990, Surrey
D905 Tu 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SRYC 5320, Surrey
D906 Tu 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SRYC 5320, Surrey
D907 Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SRYC 5320, Surrey
D908 Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SRYC 5320, Surrey
CRIM 103 - Psychological Explanations of Criminal and Deviant Behavior (3)

An introduction to, and critical examination of, biogenetic, psychiatric, and psychological explanations of criminal and deviant behavior. Special attention will be given to the hypothesized links between criminality and genetics, physiology, the endocrine system, mental disorders, personality, moral development, and other forms of social learning. Prerequisite: PSYC 100 and 102 are recommended. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100 Jennifer Wong
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SSCC 9002, Burnaby
D101 Th 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
SWH 10218, Burnaby
D102 Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SWH 10218, Burnaby
D103 Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SWH 10218, Burnaby
D104 Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SWH 10218, Burnaby
D105 Th 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SWH 10218, Burnaby
D106 Th 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
RCB 7105, Burnaby
D107 Th 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
RCB 7105, Burnaby
D108 Th 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB 6100, Burnaby
D109 Th 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 6100, Burnaby
D110 Fr 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
AQ 5029, Burnaby
CRIM 104 - Sociological Explanations of Criminal and Deviant Behavior (3)

A survey of some major sociological perspectives on crime and deviance that will include both mainstream and critical theories. These will include: anomie, neutralization, control, group conflict, sub-cultural, ecological, functionalist and critical theories. Critical analysis of the assumptions upon which each theory is based. Examination of the similarities and differences between/among the various explanations. Prerequisite: SA 150 is recommended. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100 Stephanie Wiley
Fr 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 3003, Burnaby
D101 Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
WMC 3511, Burnaby
D102 Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 7105, Burnaby
D103 Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5027, Burnaby
D104 Fr 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5029, Burnaby
D105 Fr 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
RCB 6122, Burnaby
D900 Dawn Rault
Mo 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SRYC 2600, Surrey
D901 Mo 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SRYC 2710, Surrey
D902 Mo 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SRYC 2710, Surrey
D903 Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SRYC 2710, Surrey
D904 Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SRYC 2710, Surrey
D905 Mo 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SRYC 3010, Surrey
D906 Mo 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SRYC 3010, Surrey
D907 Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SRYC 3010, Surrey
D908 Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SRYC 3010, Surrey
CRIM 131 - Introduction to the Criminal Justice System - A Total System Approach (3)

Introductory analysis of the structure and operation of the Canadian criminal justice system. Examination of the patterns of crime and victimization; police operations, discretion and decision making; the criminal courts, including sentencing; the corrections system, including correctional institutions and community-based models; the youth justice system. Patterns of contact and conflict between various social groups and the criminal justice system. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Nikolay Shchitov
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 3182, Burnaby
D101 Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
BLU 11911, Burnaby
D102 We 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
RCB 6101, Burnaby
D103 We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
WMC 2521, Burnaby
D104 We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
WMC 2523, Burnaby
D105 We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 2521, Burnaby
D106 Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5014, Burnaby
D107 We 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
AQ 4125, Burnaby
D108 We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5047, Burnaby
D109 We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
WMC 2521, Burnaby
D110 We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5047, Burnaby
D111 Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 2122, Burnaby
D900 Danielle Murdoch
Fr 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SRYC 2600, Surrey
D901 Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SRYC 2990, Surrey
D902 Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SRYC 2990, Surrey
D903 Fr 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SRYC 2990, Surrey
D904 Fr 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SRYC 2990, Surrey
D905 Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SRYC 2995, Surrey
D906 Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SRYC 2995, Surrey
D907 Fr 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SRYC 2995, Surrey
D908 Fr 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SRYC 2995, Surrey
CRIM 135 - Introduction to Canadian Law and Legal Institutions: A Criminal Justice Perspective (3)

A general introduction to the fundamental and competing principles of jurisprudence and to the basic legal institutions of Canada. Prepares students for those law and law related courses offered within the School of Criminology and will consider the history of Canadian law, the development of the Canadian constitution, the system of Canadian courts and the roles and responsibilities of members of the legal profession. In addition, the course will consider the nature of legal reasoning, the doctrine of precedent, principles of statutory interpretation and will also introduce the fields of contract, torts, administrative law, and family law. Also examines the process of law reform in Canada. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Day/Time Location
OL01 Distance Education
CRIM 220 - Research Methods in Criminology (3)

An introduction to criminological research that is intended to develop the student's research and analytical skills. Specifically, the course will focus on the theory of inquiry, the logic, and structure of criminological inquiry, research design, data gathering, analysis and reporting. Prerequisite: Any 100 division CRIM course is recommended. Students with credit for CRIM 120 may not take CRIM 220 for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Zachary Rowan
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 3159, Burnaby
D101 Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
RCB 5120, Burnaby
D102 We 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
RCB 7105, Burnaby
D103 We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
RCB 7105, Burnaby
D104 We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB 8106, Burnaby
D105 We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 8106, Burnaby
OL01 Distance Education
CRIM 230 - Criminal Law (3)

Nature, purpose, scope, sources and basic principles of the criminal law. Study of certain fundamental legal concepts such as mens rea, negligence and strict liability. Analysis of the concept of criminal responsibility in Canada. Critical examination of the legislative policies expressed in the Criminal Code. Study of the basic elements of a criminal offence. Examination of the legal principles relating to certain specific crimes and to certain major defences. Impact of Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms on the criminal law. Prerequisite: CRIM 135.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Helene Love
Fr 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 3149, Burnaby
D101 Fr 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
D102 Fr 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
D103 Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
D104 Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
D105 Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
OL01 Distance Education

and one 200 level CRIM course

Group B Lower Division Requirements

Six courses, including

SA 150 - Introduction to Sociology (S) (4)

Explores how sociologists study, describe, and explain social life. Introduces the sociological perspective and applies it to fundamental social process and everyday issues. As we consider phenomena ranging from interactions among individuals to societal and global inequalities, students critically examine social issues to build their understanding of the world. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Kyle Willmott
Tu 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
WMC 3520, Burnaby
D101 We 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5027, Burnaby
D102 We 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5015, Burnaby
D103 We 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5029, Burnaby
D104 We 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 3511, Burnaby
D105 We 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 6101, Burnaby
D106 We 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 4125, Burnaby
D107 We 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
BLU 11901, Burnaby
D108 We 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 3531, Burnaby
D109 We 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5020, Burnaby
D110 Th 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5015, Burnaby
D111 Th 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D112 Th 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5029, Burnaby
D113 Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5027, Burnaby
D114 Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5015, Burnaby
D115 Th 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D900 Agnes MacDonald
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SRYC 2600, Surrey
D901 Mo 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SRYC 2990, Surrey
D902 Mo 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SRYC 2995, Surrey
D903 Mo 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
SRYC 2990, Surrey
D904 Mo 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
SRYC 2995, Surrey
D905 Mo 6:30 PM – 8:20 PM
SRYC 2990, Surrey
D906 Mo 6:30 PM – 8:20 PM
SRYC 2995, Surrey

and one of

POL 100 - Introduction to Politics and Government (3)

A comprehensive introduction to the study of politics and government for both political science majors and students specializing in other disciplines. The course will explore the major concepts, methods, approaches and issues in political science, as well as the primary components of government structure and the political process. Students with credit for POL 101W may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Stewart Prest
Mo 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 3520, Burnaby
D101 Mo 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 4125, Burnaby
D102 Mo 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 5027, Burnaby
D103 Mo 6:30 PM – 7:20 PM
AQ 5017, Burnaby
D104 Mo 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5017, Burnaby
D105 Mo 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 5017, Burnaby
D106 Mo 6:30 PM – 7:20 PM
AQ 5028, Burnaby
D107 Mo 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
D108 Mo 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
D109 Mo 6:30 PM – 7:20 PM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
D110 Mo 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5035, Burnaby
D111 Mo 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 5038, Burnaby
D112 Mo 6:30 PM – 7:20 PM
AQ 5038, Burnaby
POL 151 - Justice and Law (3)

The development of laws and their application to the citizen and social groups. Special consideration will be given to civil liberties. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Clare McGovern
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 3520, Burnaby
D101 Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5047, Burnaby
D102 Tu 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
BLU 11911, Burnaby
D103 Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
BLU 10655, Burnaby
D104 Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5004, Burnaby
D105 Tu 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 2268, Burnaby
D106 Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
WMC 2260, Burnaby
D107 Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
BLU 11911, Burnaby
D900 Michael Laurence
Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SRYC 5240, Surrey
D901 Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SRYC 5320, Surrey
D902 Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SRYC 3290, Surrey
D903 Th 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
SRYC 5320, Surrey

and

STAT 203 - Introduction to Statistics for the Social Sciences (3)

Descriptive and inferential statistics aimed at students in the social sciences. Scales of measurement. Descriptive statistics. Measures of association. Hypothesis tests and confidence intervals. Students in Sociology and Anthropology are expected to take SA 255 before this course. Intended to be particularly accessible to students who are not specializing in Statistics. Prerequisite: Recommended: 30 units including a research methods course such as SA 255, CRIM 220, POL 200W, or equivalent. Students cannot obtain credit for STAT 203 if they already have credit for - or are taking concurrently - STAT 101, 201, 205, 285, or any upper division STAT course. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Gamage Perera
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SSCC 9002, Burnaby
WMC 3520, Burnaby
OL01 Tim Swartz
TBD
OP01 TBD

or one of

BUS 232 - Data and Decisions I (4)

An introduction to business statistics with a heavy emphasis on applications and the use of EXCEL. Students will be required to use statistical applications to solve business problems. Prerequisite: MATH 150, MATH 151, MATH 154, or MATH 157, with a minimum grade of C-; 15 units. MATH 150, MATH 151, MATH 154, or MATH 157 may be taken concurrently with BUS 232. Students with credit for BUEC 232 or ECON 233 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D200 Andrew Flostrand
Tu, Th 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SRYC 5140, Surrey
E100 Mohammad Ghotboddini
Tu 6:00 PM – 9:50 PM
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
E200 Mohammad Ghotboddini
Th 6:00 PM – 9:50 PM
WMC 3520, Burnaby
OP06 We 4:30 PM – 8:20 PM
WMC 2301, Burnaby
PSYC 210 - Introduction to Data Analysis in Psychology (4)

Covers basic descriptive and inferential techniques most appropriately applied to the various forms of data from psychological research. Prerequisite: PSYC 201W and BC high school Math 12 with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or BC high school Math 11 with a minimum grade of B- (2.67) or any level MATH or STAT course with a C- (1.67) or FAN X99 taken at SFU with a minimum grade of C (2.00). Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Adam Blanchard
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
EDB 7618, Burnaby
D101 Tu 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 4115, Burnaby
D102 Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5025, Burnaby
D103 Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
D104 Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 2501, Burnaby
D105 Tu 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
RCB 6101, Burnaby
D106 We 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5049, Burnaby
D107 We 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5047, Burnaby
D108 We 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5017, Burnaby
D900 Adam Blanchard
Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SRYC 3090, Surrey
D901 We 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SRYC 3120, Surrey
D902 We 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SRYC 3120, Surrey
STAT 201 - Statistics for the Life Sciences (3)

Research methodology and associated statistical analysis techniques for students with training in the life sciences. Intended to be particularly accessible to students who are not specializing in Statistics. Prerequisite: Recommended: 30 units. Students cannot obtain credit for STAT 201 if they already have credit for - or are taking concurrently - STAT 101, 203, 205, 285, or any upper division STAT course. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D900 Wei Lin
Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SRYC 2600, Surrey
SRYC 2600, Surrey
OL01 Tim Swartz
TBD
OP09 TBD
STAT 205 - Introduction to Statistics (3)

The collection, description, analysis and summary of data, including the concepts of frequency distribution, parameter estimation and hypothesis testing. Intended to be particularly accessible to students who are not specializing in Statistics. Prerequisite: Recommended: 30 units. Students cannot obtain credit for STAT 205 if they already have credit for - or are taking concurrently - STAT 101, 201, 203, 285, or any upper division STAT course. Quantitative.

and

any 100 or 200 division PHIL course

and both of

PSYC 100 - Introduction to Psychology I (3)

Acquaints the student with the major issues in contemporary psychology and considers the historical antecedents. Special attention is given to questions of methodology and research design in psychology. Topics in physiological psychology, perception, learning and motivation are considered. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 George Alder
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
PSYC 102 - Introduction to Psychology II (3)

Acquaints the student with major issues in contemporary psychology and considers their historical antecedents. Topics in learning, cognition, social psychology and abnormal psychology are considered. Recommended: PSYC 100 is recommended but not required. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Russell Day
Mo, We 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby

General Electives Lower Division Requirements

Students complete the balance of the first 60 units by choosing any other 100-200 division courses. Breadth requirements must be completed for graduation and general electives should be considered for that purpose.

Upper Division Course Access and Requirements

Students with a minimum 2.25 CGPA are eligible to enroll in upper division Criminology courses upon successful completion of 60 units and Criminology program declaration.

Students complete a minimum of 60 upper division units including a minimum of 48 units in upper division Criminology* with minimum C grades in each course, including

CRIM 300W - Current Theories and Perspectives in Criminology (3)

A detailed examination of current theories and perspectives in criminology. The content of the course will change with developments in the area. Students can expect to study biological, psychological and sociological theories and perspectives, as well as those from other relevant disciplines and fields of inquiry (e.g. geography, political science and cultural studies). Prerequisite: CRIM 101. Students with credit for CRIM 300 may not take this course for further credit. Writing.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100 Alexandra Lysova
Fr 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
SWH 10081, Burnaby
D101 Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SWH 9071, Burnaby
D102 Fr 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SWH 9071, Burnaby
D103 Fr 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SWH 9071, Burnaby
D104 Mo 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
SWH 9071, Burnaby
D105 Mo 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SWH 9071, Burnaby
D106 Mo 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SWH 9071, Burnaby
D107 Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB 8106, Burnaby
D108 Fr 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 8106, Burnaby
D109 Fr 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
RCB 8106, Burnaby
D110 Mo 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
RCB 8106, Burnaby
D111 Mo 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
RCB 8106, Burnaby
D112 Mo 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB 8106, Burnaby
E100 Valerie Spicer
Fr 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
WMC 2202, Burnaby
E101 Fr 6:30 PM – 7:20 PM
SWH 9071, Burnaby
E102 Mo 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SWH 9071, Burnaby
E103 Mo 5:30 PM – 6:20 PM
SWH 9071, Burnaby
E104 Mo 6:30 PM – 7:20 PM
SWH 9071, Burnaby
CRIM 320 - Quantitative Research Methods in Criminology (3)

A detailed examination of the quantitative research methods and techniques most frequently used in criminological research. Advantages and shortcomings of each method and the appropriateness of each technique for criminological research. Problems of pure and applied research. Specific issues of interdisciplinary research. Critical evaluation of the quantitative methods used in certain major criminological studies. Prerequisite: CRIM 101; one of CRIM 120 or 220. CRIM 320 may be taken concurrently with CRIM 321. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100 Maaike Helmus
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 3260, Burnaby
D101 We 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
AQ 5040, Burnaby
D102 We 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
AQ 5040, Burnaby
D103 We 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
AQ 5040, Burnaby
D104 We 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 5040, Burnaby
D105 We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5040, Burnaby
D106 We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5040, Burnaby
D107 We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5040, Burnaby
D108 We 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5040, Burnaby
CRIM 321 - Qualitative Research Methods in Criminology (3)

A detailed examination and application of qualitative research methods and techniques most frequently used in criminological research. Advantages and disadvantages of each method and the appropriateness of each technique for criminological research. Ethics of criminological research. Specific issues of interdisciplinary research. Critical evaluation of qualitative methods used in certain major criminological studies. Prerequisite: CRIM 101; one of CRIM 120 or 220. This course may be taken concurrently with CRIM 320.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100 Dawn Rault
Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 3181, Burnaby
D101 Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SWH 9071, Burnaby
D102 Fr 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
SWH 9071, Burnaby
D103 Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SWH 9071, Burnaby
D104 Fr 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
SWH 9071, Burnaby
D105 Fr 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SWH 9071, Burnaby
D106 Th 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5029, Burnaby
D107 Fr 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D108 Fr 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
RCB 6122, Burnaby
D109 Fr 10:30 AM – 11:20 AM
RCB 5125, Burnaby
D110 Fr 11:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 5125, Burnaby
CRIM 330 - Criminal Procedure and Evidence (3)

Critical examination of selected topics in criminal procedure and evidence, including jurisdiction, police powers of search and seizure, the right to counsel and pre-trial and trial procedures. Brief survey of the system of rules and standards by means of which the admissibility of evidence is determined. Close examination of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and its impact on criminal procedure and evidence. Prerequisite: CRIM 101 and 230.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
D100 Amy Conroy
Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
BLU 9660, Burnaby
D101 Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB 7105, Burnaby
D102 Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5027, Burnaby
D103 Mo 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5015, Burnaby
D104 Tu 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
AQ 5015, Burnaby
D105 Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
RCB 5118, Burnaby
D106 Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
D107 Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
D108 Mo 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
D109 Tu 8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
D110 Tu 9:30 AM – 10:20 AM
SWH 10315, Burnaby
CRIM 490 - Honours Thesis I (3)

An in-depth investigation of a selected topic in criminology, including a comprehensive review of the literature as well as initial and partial completion of the thesis research. Open only to students who have been admitted to the criminology honours program. Prerequisite: Open only to students who have been admitted to the Criminology Honours Program.

CRIM 491 - Current Theory and Research in Criminology: Advanced Topics (4)

A detailed and comprehensive examination of the dominant theoretical research programs currently found in criminology. The subject matter of the seminars may change from year to year according to topicality and may include the following: biological theory and research; social psychological research programs (e.g., social learning theory); environmental criminology; left realism; feminism; post structuralism and post modernism. Students are also required to attend a weekly pro-seminar. Prerequisite: Open only to students who have been admitted to the Criminology Honours Program.

CRIM 499 - Honours Thesis II (9)

An honours thesis is a research report written under the supervision of a faculty member, a copy of which is to be permanently lodged in the School of Criminology. Students are required to attend a weekly seminar at which various issues associated with the linking of theory and method are examined and where students can both discuss their progress and share their research experiences. On completion, the thesis is to be orally defended in a school seminar. Open only to students who have been admitted to the criminology honours program. Students are not permitted to take other courses while enrolled in this course. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of B in CRIM 490 and 491 is required.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Gail Anderson
Mo 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
SWH 10218, Burnaby
D101 Mo 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
SWH 10218, Burnaby

*Declared Criminology students may not take CRIM 301 for credit.

Graduation Requirements

Students must obtain a minimum grade of C- in all required courses. For graduation, students must obtain a minimum 3.00 CGPA, 3.00 UDGPA, 3.00 Criminology program CGPA, and 3.00 Criminology program UDGPA.

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Honours Degree Requirements

For all bachelor of arts (BA) honours programs, students complete at least 120 units, which includes

  • at least 60 units that must be completed at Simon Fraser University
  • satisfaction of the writing, quantitative, and breadth requirements
  • students complete at least 60 upper division units, which must include at least 48 units in upper division courses in a Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences honours program; no more than 15 upper division units that have been transferred from another institution can be used toward this requirement
  • at least 60 units (including 21 upper division units) in Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences courses
  • students complete lower division requirements for at least one Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences honours program
  • students are required to achieve an overall cumulative grade point average (CGPA) and upper division CGPA of at least 3.0, and an honours program CGPA and upper division CGPA of at least 3.0

Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements

Students admitted to Simon Fraser University beginning in the fall 2006 term must meet writing, quantitative and breadth requirements as part of any degree program they may undertake. See Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements for university-wide information.

WQB Graduation Requirements

A grade of C- or better is required to earn W, Q or B credit

Requirement

Units

Notes
W - Writing

6

Must include at least one upper division course, taken at Simon Fraser University within the student’s major subject
Q - Quantitative

6

Q courses may be lower or upper division
B - Breadth

18

Designated Breadth Must be outside the student’s major subject, and may be lower or upper division
6 units Social Sciences: B-Soc
6 units Humanities: B-Hum
6 units Sciences: B-Sci

6

Additional Breadth 6 units outside the student’s major subject (may or may not be B-designated courses, and will likely help fulfil individual degree program requirements)

Students choosing to complete a joint major, joint honours, double major, two extended minors, an extended minor and a minor, or two minors may satisfy the breadth requirements (designated or not designated) with courses completed in either one or both program areas.

 

Residency Requirements and Transfer Credit

  • At least half of the program's total units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.
  • At least two thirds of the program's total upper division units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.

Elective Courses

In addition to the courses listed above, students should consult an academic advisor to plan the remaining required elective courses.