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Department of Sociology and Anthropology | Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Simon Fraser University Calendar | Summer 2022

Social Justice

Certificate
The program enables students to explore the causes of unequal treatment, compare and contrast interlocking patterns of oppression and exploitation and develop strategies for social change. This certificate program develops competence in identifying and examining the causes and consequences of social inequalities, and the differential perception and treatment of groups and individuals on the basis of a variety of factors including, but not limited to gender, sexual orientation, class, race, ethnicity, and religion. Students must apply for the certificate no later than two terms prior to graduation.

Program Requirements

Students complete a minimum total of 25 units consisting of required and optional courses, including

SA 255 - Introduction to Social Research (SA) (4)

Explores how sociologists and anthropologists investigate social relations and contexts. Students learn to develop research questions and turn them into research projects. Introduces data collection techniques and related ethical issues, the relationship between theory and research, and other fundamental concepts and issues involved in conducting qualitative and quantitative research. Prerequisite: SA 101 or 150. Quantitative.

and one of

SA 101 - Introduction to Anthropology (A) (4)

Anthropology asks fundamental questions about how people live and interact in different contexts. Engages with contemporary social life around the world, including the relations among people, ideas, and things. Provides analytical tools to help understand the role of culture and society in our lives. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Natasha Ferenczi
Mo 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
AQ 3154, Burnaby
D101 Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5015, Burnaby
D102 Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D103 Mo 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5029, Burnaby
D104 Mo 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D105 Mo 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 5029, Burnaby
SA 150 - Introduction to Sociology (S) (4)

Explores how sociologists study, describe, and explain social life. Introduces the sociological perspective and applies it to fundamental social process and everyday issues. As we consider phenomena ranging from interactions among individuals to societal and global inequalities, students critically examine social issues to build their understanding of the world. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Kyle Willmott
Tu 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 3005, Burnaby
D101 Tu 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D102 Tu 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM
AQ 5029, Burnaby
D103 We 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5015, Burnaby
D104 We 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5017, Burnaby
D105 We 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5015, Burnaby
D106 We 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5017, Burnaby
OL01 Distance Education

and one of

SA 201W - Anthropology and Contemporary Life (A) (4)

An introduction to the anthropological perspective as applied to the organization of everyday life in contemporary settings. Introduces positivist, interpretive, and critical interpretive approaches to the analysis of social actions, identities, and values as enacted in space and time. Prerequisite: Recommended: SA 101. Writing.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Natasha Ferenczi
We 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
BLU 10655, Burnaby
SA 250 - Introduction to Sociological Theory (S) (4)

An account of sociological theory, outlining the main ideas and concepts of the principal schools of thought. Prerequisite: SA 150.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D200 Debbie Dergousoff
We 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
Fr 9:30 AM – 12:20 PM
WMC 3253, Burnaby
WMC 3510, Burnaby

and three of

CRIM 101 - Introduction to Criminology (3)

Topics will include: examination of different terms and concepts commonly used in criminology, such as crime, delinquency, deviance, criminal, victim, rehabilitation and treatment. Criminology as a body of knowledge and as a profession. Position and subject matter of criminology. Relationship between criminology and other academic disciplines. Specificity of criminology. Relationship between theory and practice. History and evolution of criminological thought. Elements of continuity and discontinuity between classical and modern theories of criminality. Levels of explanations in criminology. Practical applications of criminology. The foundations of a modern criminal policy. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Cristina Pastia
Mo 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
EDB 7618, Burnaby
D101 Mo 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5025, Burnaby
D102 Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5006, Burnaby
D103 Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5006, Burnaby
D104 Tu 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5006, Burnaby
D105 Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5006, Burnaby
D106 Mo 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
AQ 5020, Burnaby
D107 Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
BLU 10031, Burnaby
D108 Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
BLU 10031, Burnaby
ECON 102 - The World Economy (3)

An overview of the broad economic trends in the development of the world economy over the last five decades with reference to the major debates related to economic interdependence, development and growth, globalization, and the role of the major multilateral economic institutions (IMF, World Bank, OCED, ILO, UN). (lecture/tutorial). Breadth-Social Sciences.

INDG 201W - Indigenous Peoples' Perspectives on History (3)

An examination of fact and ideology in history and historic events involving contact between Indigenous and European peoples. The course will also address questions of research methodologies in studying Indigenous/European relations, such as the evaluation of oral history and written ethnohistoric sources. An additional focus will be on gender as it influences perspectives. Students with credit for FNST 201W may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Social Sci.

Section Day/Time Location
OL01 Distance Education
GEOG 100 - Our World: Introducing Human Geography (3)

A geographical introduction to how humans shape our world, with attention also given to how it shapes us. Themes may include: culture, economic activities, environmental change, globalization, politics, population, resources, and urbanization. Breadth-Humanities/Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
OL01 Leanne Roderick
TBD
GSWS 100 - Sex Talk: Introduction to Contemporary Issues in Sexuality Studies (3)

An introduction to issues in the study of sex, sexual identity, and sexual culture. Focused on contemporary theories of sexuality as well as representations in fiction, film and popular media from diverse cultural contexts. Students who have completed GDST 200 may not complete this course for further credit. Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
OL01 Natasha Patterson
TBD
GSWS 101 - Gender Talk (3)

An interdisciplinary study of the social and cultural construction of gender, and how ideas about masculinity and feminity shape current issues, knowledge, popular culture, and social policy. Students who have completed WS 101 may not take GSWS 101 for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

GSWS 102 - Feminist Action (3)

An historical and comparative survey of feminisms and feminist activism in Western European, North American, and Global communities. Students who have completed WS 102 may not take GSWS 102 for further credit. Breadth-Humanities.

HSCI 160 - Global Perspectives on Health (3)

An introduction to the differences in health and health services among the nations of the globe. Vulnerable sub-populations worldwide and their special health needs. Mechanisms whereby events in one country can impact health in another. Future worldwide health risks, their economic and health consequences. SARS, avian 'flu,' West Nile virus, 'mad cow disease,' antibiotic resistant malaria or tuberculosis. Dangers to rich and poor nations from ignoring health problems in developing world. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 John O'Neil
We 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCB 9200, Burnaby
HIST 204 - The Social History of Canada (3)

A survey of major themes in Canadian social history, which is the examination of past lived experiences. Particular attention will be paid to developing an anti-racist and feminist historical analysis of how race, gender, sexuality, and class shape everyday life, and how and why lived experiences change over time. Prerequisite: Recommended: HIST 101 and 102W. Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Elise Chenier
Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
WMC 3220, Burnaby
D101 Elise Chenier
Th 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
AQ 5025, Burnaby
D102 Elise Chenier
Th 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5025, Burnaby
LBST 101 - Work and Worker's Rights: Introducing Labour Studies (3)

Introduces key concepts and approaches for understanding the character and organization of work, employment relations, worker’s rights, and labour movements in contemporary society. Explores who does paid and unpaid work and under what conditions through the study of trends and issues, including migration and immigration, unionization, precarious employment, and automation. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 John-Henry Harter
Tu 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
BLU 10921, Burnaby
OL01 Distance Education
PHIL 120W - Moral and Legal Problems (3)

A critical examination of a range of moral and legal issues we confront in our dealings with the state and our fellow human beings, such as: Is it wrong to break the law? Should pornography and recreational drugs be illegal? Do animals have rights? Is there a duty to admit immigrants? Are there duties to the world's poor? Are indigenous peoples owed reparations? Students with credit for PHIL 120 may not take this course for further credit. Writing/Breadth-Humanities.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Bruno Guindon
Mo 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
We 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
WMC 3520, Burnaby
RCB IMAGTH, Burnaby
D101 Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5038, Burnaby
D102 Mo 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5025, Burnaby
D103 Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 2122, Burnaby
D104 Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
AQ 5019, Burnaby
D105 Mo 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
WMC 2260, Burnaby
D106 We 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 6101, Burnaby
D107 We 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 5125, Burnaby
D109 We 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
AQ 5035, Burnaby
D110 We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 5035, Burnaby
D111 We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 8105, Burnaby
D112 We 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 8104, Burnaby
POL 100 - Introduction to Politics and Government (3)

A comprehensive introduction to the study of politics and government for both political science majors and students specializing in other disciplines. The course will explore the major concepts, methods, approaches and issues in political science, as well as the primary components of government structure and the political process. Students with credit for POL 101W may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Sanjay Jeram
Tu 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
AQ 3150, Burnaby
D101 Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB 6101, Burnaby
D102 Tu 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 6101, Burnaby
D103 Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
RCB 6101, Burnaby
D104 Tu 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB 5125, Burnaby
D105 Tu 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 5125, Burnaby
D106 Tu 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM
RCB 5125, Burnaby
POL 151 - Justice and Law (3)

The development of laws and their application to the citizen and social groups. Special consideration will be given to civil liberties. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Stewart Prest
Fr 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
RCB 8100, Burnaby
D101 Fr 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM
RCB 5118, Burnaby
D102 Fr 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
RCB 5118, Burnaby
D103 Fr 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM
RCB 5118, Burnaby
D104 Fr 3:30 PM – 4:20 PM
RCB 5118, Burnaby
PSYC 106 - Psychological Issues in Contemporary Society (3)

Relates contemporary knowledge from psychology to current social problems. Provides relevant information from studies pertaining to problems such as attitude development, prejudice, race relations, addiction, behaviour technology, and family pathology. Course can be repeated for credit. See psychology department website for course description. Students may not take this course for further credit if similar topics are covered. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Ralph Mistlberger
We 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM
SSCK 9500, Burnaby
REM 100 - Global Change (3)

This course provides students with an overview of global environmental change and its causes from a social science perspective, historically and at the present time. Population growth, an increasing ecological footprint and changes in ideology, social organization, economy and technology will be critically reviewed. New ways of thinking in natural and social science will be considered in relation to specific issues such as land, soil and food; energy, raw materials and solid waste; air pollution and transportation; water, oceans and fisheries; climate change; forestry and biodiversity; urbanization, and alternative futures. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
OL01 Charles Hostovsky
TBD
SA 203 - Violence in War and Peace (SA) (4)

A critical examination of the relationship between violence and structural inequalities. Focus will be on different forms that violence assumes in war and peace and how acts of violence are remembered, collectively denied or misrecognized. Particular case studies may include colonization of indigenous people, Holocaust, South African Apartheid, India's Partition, the genocide in Rwanda, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, 9/11 and its aftermath along with everyday suffering, including gender violence. As well, special attention will be given to anthropological witnessing.

Section Day/Time Location
C100 Distance Education
SA 260 - Individual and Society (S) (4)

An examination of how self and identity (e.g. race, class, gender, sexual orientation) are socially derived within contemporary western culture, and of the ways that individuals shape their social environment.

SD 281 - Introduction to Sustainability (3)

Introduces the challenges and opportunities for developing sustainable communities and a sustainable world, through the framework of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and alternative perspectives around sustainability (e.g. Indigenous, just sustainabilities etc.). Students will also learn from the practical experience of diverse experts and sustainability professionals. Conventional approaches to sustainable development will be critiqued to ensure considerations for equity and social justice. Highlights will be showcased from the Global North and Global South. Students with credit for SCD 201 or REM 201 or REM 281 may not complete this course for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
OL01 Charles Hostovsky
TBD

and one upper division SA course (must be completed at Simon Fraser University)

Subject to steering committee approval, students may substitute relevant special topics or related courses.

* sociology and/or anthropology majors are required to include one non-SA course among the three optional courses

Transfer Credit

Up to 12 units assigned to specific courses may be transferred to this certificate, subject to University transfer credit regulations and the program co-ordinator's approval.