SFU Calendar 2001-2002

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Department of History


6022 Academic Quadrangle, (604) 2914467 Tel, (604) 2915837 Fax, www.sfu.ca/history

Chair

H.J.M. Johnston BA (Tor), MA (WOnt), PhD (Lond)

Graduate Program Chair

T.M. Loo BSc (Br Col), MA (Tor), PhD (Br Col)

Faculty and Areas of Research

see "Department of History". for a complete list of faculty.

L. Armstrong - Italian Renaissance

R.E. Boyer - Latin America

W.L. Cleveland - Middle East

J.S. Craig - early modern England

R.K. Debo - Russia

P.E. Dutton - ancient and Medieval

C.I. Dyck - modern Britain

M.D. Fellman - United States

K. Ferguson - 20th century United States

D.P. Gagan - hospitals, health care, social classes

H. Gay - history, philosophy of science

A. Gerolymatos - Greece and Balkans

J.F. Hutchinson - social, Russia

H.J.M. Johnston - Canada

J.M. Kitchen - Germany, Socialism

M. Leier - Canada, labor

J.I. Little - Canada, French Canada

T.M. Loo - Canada, law, environment

D. MacLean - Middle East, Islam, India

J. Matsumura - East Asia

H. Pabel - early modern Europe

R. Panchasi - modern France

J. Parr - Canada

M. Prokopow - Anglo-Atlantic colonial world

P. Raibmon - First Nations history

D.A. Ross - Africa

N. Roth - modern Germany

A. Seager - Canada, labor

M.L. Stewart - Europe, social, women's studies

J.O. Stubbs - modern Britain

Areas of Study

The Department of History offers graduate research leading to an MA and PhD. The major study areas are Canada, Europe, colonialism and imperialism, the Middle East, the Americas, and Africa. Only those who wish to specialize in one of the specific fields covered by the list of MA courses in the case of MA applicants, or PhD areas of specialization in the case of PhD applicants, will be considered for admission. The department reserves the right to accept candidates only when a qualified supervisor is available and the University resources (including library facilities) are deemed adequate for the student's stated research priority.

Admission of Graduate Students

Admission for MA students will be in the fall semester only, and for PhD and part time MA students in either fall or spring semesters. Applications for fall should be completed by February 15, and applications for spring admission by October 15 of the previous year. Applicants must submit a sample of their written work.

MA Program

Conditions of Admission

MA candidates must satisfy the minimum University entrance requirements: at least a 3.0 average or its equivalent. In addition, the department requires a 3.33 (B+) average in history courses taken during the last two years of the undergraduate program. A degree in a discipline related to history may be accepted in some cases.

Programs of Study

Upon graduate program admission, students are assigned a provisional supervisor. see "1.6.4 Supervisory Committee". for supervisory committee information. All MA degree candidates must satisfy the following minimum requirements, totalling 30 credit hours.

The department offers two options. The thesis option requires 20 credit hours (four courses of five credit hours each), of which at least 15 must be in graduate courses in the department. The project option requires 30 credit hours, (six courses of five credit hours each) of which 20 must be in graduate courses in the department.

Normally, three seminars are offered each fall and spring semester, including one in conjunction with the University of British Columbia's Department of History, at the Harbour Centre campus.

All Canadian history students must take HIST 806, another seminar of their choice, and the research seminar HIST 814. All European history students must take HIST 810, another seminar of their choice, and the research seminar HIST 814. Other students must take one seminar and HIST 814. Remaining course requirements may be taken as readings courses.

In HIST 814, each thesis option student writes a paper which becomes the basis of the thesis. It should present a coherent thesis topic and place this topic within the framework of existing work in the area. Each project option student is required to write a short research paper which becomes the basis of the required research project.

Full time MA thesis option students complete degree requirements in a maximum of five semesters, and project option students in a maximum of three semesters. Part time thesis option students complete degree requirements in a maximum of eight semesters and part time project option students in a maximum of six semesters.

Students with significant financial support from fellowships, scholarships or teaching assistantships are expected to take a full semester course load. Those with no financial aid from fellowships, teaching assistantships, etc. may be considered part time students and may take only one course per semester.

Students complete a thesis of 10 credit hours with a maximum length of 100 pages, or a research project of approximately 35 pages. The student's thesis/research project must demonstrate capability in scholarly research and procedures as well as independent critical thought. Before the beginning of the third semester, thesis option students defend the thesis prospectus before an examining committee made up of the supervisory committee and the graduate program committee chair. The project option student will defend his/her research project in the same time frame.

Full time thesis option students complete their degree requirements in a maximum of five semesters, and project option students in three. Part time students may take one additional year for completion.

Language Requirements

Students must demonstrate a reading ability in a language other than English that is acceptable to the supervisory committee. Students proposing to study Canadian history must demonstrate an ability to read French. Ability is determined by a time limited examination consisting of the translation of a passage of history in the particular language. A dictionary is permitted. The Department of French offers courses to help students meet the language requirements.

PhD Program

General

Prospective PhD candidates are advised that the degree is granted in recognition of the student's general grasp of the subject matter of a broad area of study; for the ability to think critically; and for the power to analyse and co-ordinate problems and data from allied fields of study.

A student ordinarily is admitted to the PhD program after completion of an MA or its equivalent. BA applicants applying directly to the PhD program must have at least a 3.5 GPA or its equivalent. Candidates for the MA may, under exceptional circumstances, be admitted to the PhD program without completing the MA requirements if they have 20 credit hours of course work. Admission from the MA program is contingent upon a distinguished level of performance, recommendation of directing faculty, scholarly potential, and available department resources.

Programs of Study

Upon program admission, each student is assigned a faculty supervisor. see "1.6 Supervision". for information on supervisory committees. The supervisory committee and the student determine three fields of study, at least two of which are chosen from the list below. A third field may be chosen within or outside the Department of History with permission of the graduate studies committee.

The student and each field supervisor will agree as soon as possible on a general readings list of approximately 45 books (or the equivalent) in each field. Reading list copies must be submitted to the chair of the graduate program committee by the beginning of the second semester. The graduate program committee approves these lists and places them in the student's files. Students are expected to cover the material on these lists, preferably by means of a structured reading and writing program with their supervisors.

The comprehensive examinations, based on the reading lists, are offered twice a year, in the first half of the fall and spring semesters. Written examinations are administered in weeks five and six of the semester. Oral examinations are scheduled in weeks six through seven of the same semester. Students who miss the first round of examinations in their fourth semester due to extenuating circumstances must take the examinations the following semester. For details on the nature of the comprehensive examinations, see the Department of History's graduate brochure. All written examinations must be passed before the oral comprehensive exam takes place. A student who fails one of the written examinations, and one only, will have one additional chance for reexamination before sitting the oral examination. A `fail,' `pass,' or `pass with distinction' will be assigned by the examining committee after completion of the oral exam. Students failing at this stage are not allowed to continue in the program.

PhD Fields

Canadian social and cultural history

Canadian political and economic history

European social history

European cultural history

European intellectual history

European international relations since the early 19th century

gender and history

rural history

Mediaeval Europe

France since 1789

Germany since the 18th century

Russia since Peter the Great

the British Isles since 1485

Great Britain as a great power since 1763

state and society in the nineteenth century Ottoman empire

state and society in the twentieth century Middle East

the Middle East in the international system

the geopolitics of the Indian empire

Islamic India

sub-Saharan Africa since 1800

European settlement in Africa

United States to 1890

United States since 1890

United States cultural history 1830-1890

colonial Latin America

Latin America since Independence

Thesis

Within one semester of successful completion of comprehensive exams and formal candidacy admission, students submit a thesis prospectus on a topic selected from the specialization areas listed above. The same procedure is followed for MA candidates but the thesis committee may seek the participation of another who has particular expertise in the area of the proposed thesis topic. Through the thesis, the student must demonstrate an original contribution to knowledge. When the thesis is complete and the student is ready to offer himself/herself for the degree, a thesis examining committee will be formed, composed of the chair of the departmental graduate program committee or designate; the student's supervisory committee; a member of faculty or a person otherwise suitably qualified who is not a member of the supervisory committee; and an external examiner who is not a University employee. This committee examines the student on the thesis and in the student's major field of study. see "Graduate General Regulations". for further information and regulations.

Language Requirements

Students must demonstrate a reading ability in one language other than English that is acceptable to the supervisory committee. Students proposing to study Canadian history must demonstrate an ability to read French, determined by a time limited examination consisting of the translation of a passage of history in the particular language. A dictionary will be permitted.

The Department of French offers courses to help graduate students meet this requirements.

Graduate Courses

HIST 814 is a compulsory MA seminar offered each spring semester. HIST 806 and 810 are also offered as seminars each year. At least two other seminars will normally be offered, the choice depending on the research interests of the majority of the students.

HIST 805-5 Western Canada
HIST 806-5 Themes in Canadian History
HIST 810-5 Themes in European History
HIST 812-5 Special Topics in History
HIST 814-5 Research Seminar
HIST 819-5 Medieval Europe
HIST 820-5 Tudor and Stuart England
HIST 821-5 Early Modern Europe
HIST 822-5 Modern Great Britain
HIST 823-5 Modern Russia
HIST 824-5 Modern France
HIST 825-5 Modern Germany
HIST 826-5 International Relations
HIST 828-5 European Cultural and Intellectual History
HIST 843-5 United States to 1890
HIST 844-5 United States since 1890
HIST 845-5 Latin America to 1825
HIST 846-5 Latin America since 1825
HIST 851-5 State and Society in 19th Century Middle East
HIST 852-5 State and Society in the Modern Middle East
HIST 854-5 Imperialism in the Middle East
HIST 864-5 Tropical Africa
HIST 870-5 Culture and Society in China
HIST 871-5 Culture and Society in India
HIST 881-5 Great Britain as a Great Power Since 1763
HIST 884-5 Health and Society
HIST 885-5 Law and Society
HIST 886-5 Migration and Settlement
HIST 887-5 Comparative Labour History
HIST 888-5 Native-European Contact
HIST 890-5 Gender and History
HIST 891-5 The French Experience in North America
HIST 892-5 Religion and Society
HIST 893-5 State and Society
HIST 894-5 War and Society
HIST 895-5 Rural History
HIST 896-5 Culture and Identity
HIST 897-5 Supervised Readings
HIST 898-0 MA Thesis
HIST 899-0 PhD Thesis
HIST 900-0 Research Project


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Index : searchable with the Find function in your web browser Calendar.pdfs Office of the Registrar / SFU
Table of Contents : searchable with the Find function in your web browser Course Database or Course Outlines
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Financial Assistance