SFU Calendar 2001-2002

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Department of Sociology and Anthropology


5053 Academic Quadrangle, (604) 2913518 Tel, (604) 2915799 Fax, www.sfu.ca/sociology

Chair

E. Gee BA, PhD (Br Col)

Faculty and Areas of Research

see "Department of Sociology and Anthropology". for a complete list of faculty.

H. Adam - political sociology, critical theory, nationalism, migration, Germany, southern Africa

M. Boelscher-Ignace - practice theory, language and culture, aboriginal resource management, aboriginal peoples of northwestern North America

D. Culhane - critical anthropology, anthropology of/and colonialism, anthropology of/and law, First Nations, contemporary ethnography, visual anthropology

P. Dossa - critical anthropology, anthropology of health, anthropology of diaspora and migration, Muslim minorities: gender, disability, aging.

N. Dyck - social anthropology, sport and childhood, aboriginal peoples and governments, Canadian society

K. Froschauer - Canadian social issues, political economy, sociology of development, immigration, East Asia

M. Gates - development studies, agricultural policy and practice, environmental anthropology, urban anthropology, NAFTA, Latin America, Mexico

E. Gee - demography, sociology of aging, sociology of the family, social policy, gender

M. Howard - development studies, ethnicity, natural resources management, textiles and art, southwest Pacific, southeast Asia

M. Kenny - anthropology and medicine, anthropology and psychiatry (memory as a political issue in child abuse, amnesia and multiple personality), religion and society, 19th century American social history, history of eugenics

D. Lacombe - contemporary social theory, sexuality and moral panic, deviance and social problems

A.T. McLaren - sociology of gender, education and the family

B. Mitchell - families and aging, youth transitions, intergenerational relations, quantitative methods, social policy, health promotion

G.P. Nicholas - North American prehistory, prehistory and contemporary human ecology, ecology of wetlands, cultural resource management

G. Otero - political sociology, political economy of development, sociology of agriculture, science and technology, social movements, NAFTA, Mexico and Latin America

S. Pigg - contemporary anthropological theory, transnational cultures and post colonial social relations, anthropology of medicine, anthropology of development, Nepal

J. Pulkingham - social policy, feminist political economy, gender, sociology of the family (especially family law)

G.B. Teeple - political economy of Canada, Hegelian and Marxist philosophy, sociology of art, neoliberalism and the global division of labor

A. Travers - sociological theory, feminist theorizing on the liberal democratic public sphere, gender and technology, sociology of sport and leisure, social issues and movements

J.M. Whitworth - sociology of religion (especially sects, cults and new religions), sociological theory, 19th century British and North American intellectual history

Admission

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology offers programs of advanced learning and research leading to MA and PhD degrees. The MA program is available on both a part time and a full time basis.

see "1.3 Admission". for general admission requirements. The department also requires a written statement about the student's current interests and prospective research. How well the applicant's proposed research coincides with the research and teaching interests of the faculty is an important admission consideration. PhD applicants must submit a sample of their work from earlier or ongoing graduate studies.

Admission applications are normally considered once each year at the end of January. The program commences in September.

Contact the department's graduate program chair or secretary for further program information.

Areas of Study
MA Program Degree Requirements

The MA program may be completed through course work and either an essay or research project option or a thesis option.

All students are admitted to the essay or project option and require the recommendation of their supervisory committee and the approval of the department graduate program committee to transfer to the thesis option.

Except under extenuating circumstances, students may transfer only once during their time in the MA program.

Option 1: Courses and Extended Essays or Research Project Report

The minimum requirements for completion of the degree program include four one-semester courses, and two extended essays or one research project report.

Courses

Students must complete four one-semester courses, two of which must be SA 850 or 870; and SA 857. The remaining two courses will be chosen from SA 886, SA readings courses, a course in another department or university. (The option of the readings courses and the extra-departmental courses must be approved by the student's supervisory committee and the departmental graduate program committee. Any student with deficiencies may be asked to complete more courses.)

Extended Essays or Research Project Report

The extended essays or research project option requires the completion of either:

or

The extended essays and the research project reports should demonstrate capability in scholarly research as well as independent critical thought and will be examined by the student's supervisory committee and a qualified external examiner. Extended essays and research project reports will be bound and placed in the library.

The minimum degree completion requirements under this option include three one-semester courses and one thesis. Students who wish to transfer to this option must submit a thesis proposal to their supervisory committee at the end of the first semester of enrollment in the program. Supervisory committees may then recommend to the department graduate program committee that the student be permitted to transfer to the thesis option. See the department handbook for further details.

Courses

Students complete three one-semester courses, two of which must be SA 850 or 870 and 857. The remaining course is chosen from SA 886, SA readings course, a course in another department or university. The option of the readings course and the extra-departmental course must be approved by the student's supervisory committee and the departmental graduate program committee. Students with deficiencies may be asked to complete more courses.

Thesis

The thesis option focuses on high quality research study. The thesis will normally consist of no more than 75-100 pages, inclusive of bibliographies, appendices and tables. At the discretion of the supervisory committee, the maximum number of pages may be increased. This will normally be done only to facilitate the inclusion of large appendices and tables. The thesis will be examined by the student's supervisory committee and a qualified external examiner. Theses are bound and placed in the library.

PhD Program Degree Requirements

Students complete four one-semester courses, two of which must be SA 850 or 870 and SA 857.

If a doctoral student has completed an MA in the department, course requirements remain the same as for other doctoral students, but special arrangements will be made by the department's graduate program committee so that SA 850 or 870 is not repeated.

The remaining two courses will be chosen from SA 886, SA readings courses, or a course in another department or university. The option of the readings courses and the extra-departmental courses must be approved by the student's supervisory committee and the departmental graduate program committee. Any student with deficiencies may be asked to complete more courses.

Students must also complete a written qualifying examination in theory and methodology.

Prior to commencing work on the thesis, the student will defend a written prospectus on the thesis in an oral examination.

Students must prepare a thesis. See the departmental handbook for guidelines. An oral examination on the thesis is also required.

Graduate Seminar

All full-time graduate students must attend and actively participate in the graduate seminar during the first two semesters of their program. In subsequent semesters, attendance and registration is voluntary. Special arrangements will be made for part-time students to fulfil this requirement.

Language Requirement

Although the department recognizes that a knowledge of French or foreign languages is desirable for advanced degree studies, it does not have prescribed language requirements. However, where a language other than English is necessary for the candidate's field work or reading, the student will be required to attain the necessary proficiency.

Graduate Courses

SA 840-2 Graduate Seminar
SA 841-0 Graduate Seminar
SA 850-5 Advanced Sociological Theory
SA 853-5 Readings in Sociology I
SA 854-5 Readings in Sociology II
SA 857-5 Research Design Seminar
SA 870-5 Advanced Anthropological Theory
SA 871-5 Readings in Anthropology I
SA 872-5 Readings in Anthropology II
SA 886-5 Selected Problems in Social Analysis
SA 896-0 MA Extended Essays
SA 897-0 MA Researcg Project
SA 898-0 MA Thesis
SA 899-0 PhD Thesis


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Index : searchable with the Find function in your web browser Calendar.pdfs Office of the Registrar / SFU
Table of Contents : searchable with the Find function in your web browser Course Database or Course Outlines
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Financial Assistance