SFU Calendar 2001-2002

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Department of Archaeology


9635 Education Building, (604) 291-4727 Tel, (604) 291-5666 Fax, www.sfu.ca/archaeology

Chair

D.V. Burley BA, MA (New Br), PhD (S Fraser)

Graduate Program Chair

B.D. Hayden BA (Col), MA, PhD (Tor), 778.782 4781

Faculty and Areas of Research

see "Department of Archaeology". for a complete list of faculty.

D.V. Burley - historical archaeology, cultural resource management, theory, northwest North America, South Pacific

R.L. Carlson - archaeology and ethnology North America, particularly Northwest Coast, Southwest, material culture, and early peopling of the New World, museology, primitive art

A.C. D'Andrea - paleoethnobotany, bioarchaeology, early agriculture, ethnoarchaeology, subsistence, East Asia, Africa

J.C. Driver - zooarchaeology, cultural ecology, Western Canada, American Southwest

K.R. Fladmark - northwest North America, geoarchaeology, paleoindian, Quaternary studies, Canadian prehistory, native cultures of North America

B.M.F. Galdikas - primate behavior, orangutan research and conservation

B.D. Hayden - lithics, ethnoarchaeology, Northwest Interior, Southeast Asia, hunter/gatherers, cultural ecology, method and theory

P.M. Hobler - Northwest Coast, Southwest, field techniques, historic components at Native sites

R.W. Jamieson - historical archaeology, Spanish colonialism, domestic architecture, material culture, ethnohistory, Andean South America

D. Lepofsky - Northwest Pacific, Oceania, cultural ecology, paleoethnobotany, households, prehistoric land use

D. Lyons - ethnoarchaeology, gender, theory, households, Arctic, Africa

J.D. Nance - statistical archaeology, southeast North America, method and theory

D.E. Nelson - archaeometric methods, stable isotope analysis, radiocarbon dating by accelerator mass spectrometry

G.P. Nicholas - northeast North America and Plateau, hunter/gatherers, cultural ecology, indigenous peoples and archaeology, wetlands, Quaternary studies

R. Shutler Jr. - paleoanthropology of East and Southeast Asia and Japan, prehistory Oceania, paleoindian New World

M.F. Skinner - physical anthropology, skeletal biology, forensic anthropology, paleoanthropology, paleopathology

D. Yang - physical anthropology, ancient DNA, DNA diagnosis of diseases from ancient remains, molecular forensic anthropology, molecular archaeology, North America, East Asia, Europe

E.C. Yellowhorn*- plains and fur trace archaeology, oral history, taditional knowledge, ethno-science, araeoastronomy, indegenous archaeolgy

Adjunct Faculty

A.D. McMillan - archaeology and ethnology of Canada, particularly Northwest coast, native arts

D. Sutton - archaeology of the South Pacific

Associate Members

J.M. D'Auria, Chemistry

D.J. Huntley, Physics

R.W. Mathewes, Biological Sciences

*joint appointment with First Nations studies

Areas of Study

The department offers specialization in archaeometry, art, ceramic analysis, cultural resource management, ethnoarchaeology, forensic anthropology, geoarchaeology, historical archaeology, lithic analysis, palaeoanthropology, palaeoethnobotany, skeletal biology and zooarchaeology. The student is expected to gain a comprehensive understanding of the discipline. In so doing, the student should strive to acquire a general knowledge of world prehistory, physical anthropology, and archaeological theory and method, in addition to gaining knowledge and expertise in particular areas of research interest. Depending on enrollments, individual or group courses can be arranged in addition to regularly scheduled courses.

Degree Requirements

A distinction is made between those who are enrolled in the program and those who have formally advanced to degree candidacy. A candidate is a student who successfully completed the requirements for advancement to candidacy (defined below). Normally, candidacy advancement happens once the Simon Fraser University residence requirement is fulfilled, but not later than the end of the ninth semester after PhD admission and not later than the end of the sixth semester for MA students.

MA Program

This program consists of these sequential steps: course requirements, thesis prospectus, colloquium presentation, advancement to candidacy, and thesis completion and defence.

Course Requirements

In addition to the thesis, students complete a minimum of four graduate courses including ARCH 871. Students may be required by their committee to take additional courses and are also required to take ARCH 872/873 each semester the course is offered. Credit for ARCH 873 does not constitute part of the normal MA requirement. Grading for these courses will be restricted to satisfactory/unsatisfactory (S/U).

Advancement to Candidacy

Advancement to candidacy requirements follow.

The colloquium is not to be considered a defence of the prospectus, per se, but is a means whereby the student may benefit from the collective expertise of the department.

Thesis

After the above, students advance to candidacy and complete and defend the thesis. The defence topic should be the thesis itself and related matters.

PhD Program

This program consists of these sequential steps: course requirements, comprehensive exam, thesis prospectus, colloquium presentation, advancement to candidacy, thesis completion and defence.

Course Requirements

Course requirements are determined in consultation with the supervisory committee.

In addition to the comprehensive exam and thesis, normal course requirements consist of a minimum of three graduate courses including ARCH 871. Students may be required to take additional courses and are also required to take ARCH 872/873 each semester the course is offered. ARCH 873 credit does not constitute part of the normal course requirements. Grading for these 872/873 courses will be restricted to satisfactory/unsatisfactory (S/U).

Comprehensive Exam

Students write a comprehensive examination prior to candidacy to test general knowledge in archaeology and in three regional or topical areas. Grading is on a pass/fail basis but the examination or parts thereof may be repeated once, at the department's discretion.

Advancement to Candidacy

Formal advancement to candidacy shall take place when the following have been completed.

The colloquium is not considered a defence of the prospectus, but a means whereby students may benefit from the department's collective expertise.

Thesis

After the above, students advance to candidacy and complete and defend the thesis. The defence topic should be the thesis itself and related matters.

Language Requirement

A knowledge of a language other than English is desirable, but there are no prescribed language requirements. However, if knowledge of a language is necessary for the field work or reading, he/she will be required to attain the necessary language proficiency.

Graduate Courses

ARCH 871-5 Archaeological Theory

Critical evaluation of new approaches to the study of the human past.

ARCH 872-0 Graduate Seminar in Archaeology and Prehistory

A seminar on selected problems in archaeological science and prehistory. Grading will be restricted to satisfactory/unsatisfactory (S/U).

ARCH 873-2 Graduate Seminar in Archaeology and Prehistory

A seminar on selected problems in archaeological science and prehistory. Students may take ARCH 873 for credit once in the graduate program.

ARCH 876-5 Research Design

Seminar focusing on the development of thesis research design and data analysis.

ARCH 892-5 Directed Readings in Prehistory

Directed readings under the supervision of a faculty member in the prehistory of any selected region of the world.

ARCH 893-3 Directed Readings

Intensive readings under the supervision of a faculty member in an area of interest related to the student's program.

ARCH 894-3 Special Topics

This course will be offered from time to time to meet special needs of students and make use of specialization of visiting faculty members.

ARCH 895-5 Special Topics

This course will be offered from time to time to meet special needs of students and to make use of specialization of visiting faculty members.

ARCH 896-5 Directed Laboratory/Library/Field Research

Directed laboratory, library or field research under the supervision of a faculty member in an area of interest related to the student's program.

ARCH 898-0 MA Thesis
ARCH 899-0 PhD Thesis


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Index : searchable with the Find function in your web browser Calendar.pdfs Office of the Registrar / SFU
Table of Contents : searchable with the Find function in your web browser Course Database or Course Outlines
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Financial Assistance