SFU Calendar 2001-2002

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School of Criminology


2630 Diamond Building, (604) 2914762/3213 Tel, (604) 2914140 Fax, crimgrad@sfu.ca E-mail, www.sfu.ca/criminology

Director

R.M. Gordon BA (Latrobe), MA (S Fraser), PhD (Br Col)

Graduate Program Director

P.L. Brantingham AB (Col), MA (Fordham), MSP, PhD (Florida State)

Faculty and Areas of Research

see "School of Criminology". for a complete list of faculty.

G.S. Anderson - forensic, medical and veterinary entomology

E.O. Boyanowsky - community standards and the law, environment, emotion and behaviour, media and crime, group behavior, police, gangs and juries

N.T. Boyd - critical analysis of Canadian criminal law, homicide, Canadian narcotics legislation, legal control of pornography

P.J. Brantingham - environmental and historical criminology

P.L. Brantingham - environmental criminology, crime prevention through environmental design, criminal justice planning, policy evaluations

J. Brockman - feminist jurisprudence, social science evidence in court, self regulation and the sociology of professions, white collar and corporate crime, criminal law, procedure and evidence

B. Burtch - penology, corrections, sociology of law, social control, reproduction and law, state theory, electronic monitoring of offenders

M. Carter - criminal law, family law, contemporary legal theory

W. Chan - critical criminology, feminist jurisprudence, homicides between partners, representations of women and violence, technology and social theory

D.E. Chunn - feminist legal theory; crimes of authorities; family, law and social policy; historical sociology of crime, law and social welfare; media representations of women in law; `policing' violence against women

R.R. Corrado - comparative juvenile justice, terrorism, evaluation research, administration of justice in Canada

F.D. Cousineau - juvenile justice, deterrence, sociology of criminological research

E. Elliott - social philosophy of punishment and abolitionism, critical analysis of the prison, women in prison, fear of crime

K. Faith - feminist theory, gender/race/class relations and crime, media imagery of female criminals, philosophical/historical criminology, female incarceration, medieval to 20th century witch hunts, political economy and social problems

W.G. Glackman - research methodology, multivariate statistical techniques, forensic psychology, perceptions of crime

R.M. Gordon - mental health law, young offenders and police, political economy of crime, sociology of law

C.T. Griffiths - corrections, Native American criminality, delinquency and involvement in the criminal justice system, delivery of criminal justice services in the North, cross cultural studies in juvenile justice

M.A. Jackson - criminal justice administration and planning, judicial attitudes and sentencing behaviour, corrections (including alternatives to incarceration), law enforcement management, psychiatric decision-making, elderly, native, and female offenders

D. Lacombe - sociology of law and deviance, gender relations, political sociology

J. Lowman - prostitution, prostitution law and law enforcement, sociology of punishment, critical theory, research ethics

R.J. Menzies - assessment of dangerousness, sociology of law, critical criminology, psychiatry and law, dangerousness and violence, clinical and judicial decision-making, history of crime and mental health, research methods

J.A. Osborne - criminal law and procedure, human rights and civil liberties, administration of criminal justice, juvenile justice

T.S. Palys - research methodology, evaluation and assessment, decision-making, philosophy of science/sociology of knowledge

S.N. Verdun-Jones - criminal law, procedure and evidence, comparative criminal law and procedure, jurisprudence, sociology of law, interdisciplinary criminal justice research, history of criminal justice

Associate Members

S. Duguid, Humanities

J. Whatley, Continuing Studies

C. Yerbury, Continuing Studies

Degrees Offered

The school's graduate programs lead to MA and PhD degrees.

Areas of Study and Research

The graduate programs in criminology concentrate on advanced academic study and have a strong research emphasis. The broad goal of the program is to prepare students for careers in the teaching of criminology, in criminological research and in policy-making in criminal justice.

The emphasis of the graduate programs is to foster a spirit of inquiry and creative endeavour among the students, to develop their critical and analytical capabilities, and to train them in the various techniques of criminological research.

The graduate programs focus on five major (core) areas.

Criminology Research Centre

see "Criminology Research Centre"..

Feminist Institute for Studies on Law and Society

see "Feminist Institute for Studies on Law and Society"..

Institute for Studies in Criminal Justice Policy

see "Institute for Studies in Criminal Justice Policy"..

MA Program

Admission

Students holding a baccalaureate or equivalent from a recognized institution must meet the admission requirements for graduate studies.

see "1.3.2 Admission to a Graduate Diploma Program". and also see "1.3.8 Conditional Admission".

Normally, an applicant should have at least one course in social science research methods and one undergraduate introductory course in statistics.

Applicants must forward official transcripts and send a short statement of interests which includes a description of previous employment, and research or other work relevant to the candidate's proposed graduate studies. Letters of recommendation from people who know the candidates and are familiar with their work are required.

A cheque or money order for $55 (Canadian), made payable to Simon Fraser University, should be submitted with the application form.

Deadlines for completed applications, for entrance commencing fall semester, is February 1. Applicants will be informed of the outcome as soon as possible thereafter.

Degree Requirements

Candidates for an MA degree must take a minimum of eighteen (18) credit hours of course work consisting of

and one of

or

plus

The thesis will not normally be more than 100 pages in length, including bibliography and footnotes, but exclusive of appendices.

Satisfactory Performance

The candidate's progress is assessed at least twice a year by the school (spring and fall). A student who performs unsatisfactorily is not permitted to continue in the program, subject to the procedure for the review of unsatisfactory progress described in Graduate General Regulation 1.8.2 (page 301).

PhD Program

Admission

The minimum university requirements for admission to the doctoral program are provided in the Graduate General Regulations 1.3.3 (page 297).

Normally, an applicant should have at least one course in social science research methods and one undergraduate introductory course in statistics.

Direct admission may be approved for persons with a master's in criminology, a master's in a discipline other than criminology and, under exceptional circumstances, with an undergraduate degree or its equivalent provided that a CGPA of at least 3.5 has been maintained.

Applicants must submit a statement of research interests and at least two examples of previous academic work.

In exceptional circumstances, undergraduate degree holders (or equivalent) may be admitted if they meet University regulations for entry with a BA, have demonstrated a capacity for original research at the undergraduate level, and are recommended for direct entry by at least two criminology faculty members who are eligible to teach or supervise in the PhD program. Those who meet the GPA requirement and have demonstrated research ability through field criminal justice experience may also be considered on recommendation of at least two faculty members involved in the program. Those so admitted have their status reviewed by the end of the second semester following admission. The graduate program committee determines the candidate's ability to complete the PhD by direct entry. The student will either be confirmed as an approved PhD candidate in criminology or directed to seek admission to the master's program.

Because many disciplines are allied to criminology, the graduate program committee reserves the right to determine equivalent courses already taken in the applicant's master's program. At the time of admission, the graduate program committee may waive up to 15 credit hours of requirements.

A cheque or money order for $55 (Canadian), made payable to Simon Fraser University, must be submitted with the application form. The school must receive the completed application, for entrance to the fall semester, by February 1. Applicants are informed of the outcome as soon as possible thereafter.

Note: Those with two consecutive degrees from the School of Criminology at Simon Fraser University will not normally be admissible to the PhD program.

Degree Requirements

PhD candidates must take a minimum of 33 credit hours consisting of

A maximum of nine credit hours may be taken in another department or university on approval of the student's supervisory committee and the graduate program committee. These courses may be accepted as partially meeting the requirements for any courses in the PhD program.

All students must write comprehensive exams in two of the five graduate core areas of the curriculum. Normally, students are expected to finish courses and comprehensives within two years of entering the program.

Note: While two of the course areas are entitled `methods' and `theory,' methodological and theoretical issues are relevant to all core areas.

Dissertation Procedures

In the semester after comprehensive examinations are passed, each candidate develops a thesis prospectus, based on original research, which defines the proposed investigation and demonstrates the relationship between it and existing scholarship. The thesis proposal is presented to the supervisory committee and, on approval, is circulated to faculty and resident graduate students and presented at a colloquium.

The thesis is defended in oral examination by an examining committee constituted under the provisions of Graduate General Regulation 1.9.3 (page 301).

Satisfactory Performance

The progress of each candidate is assessed at least twice a year by the school (spring and fall). Students who perform unsatisfactorily may not continue in the program, subject to the procedure for review of unsatisfactory progress described in Graduate General Regulation 1.8.2 (page 301).

Graduate Courses

CRIM 800-3 Theories of Crime

A comprehensive overview of theories and the development of theoretical knowledge in criminology. This seminar will familiarize students with competing levels of understanding vis-ŕ-vis crime and deviance phenomena. The course will emphasize the integration of historical and contemporary theory, theory construction and testing, and the impact of factors such as ideology, politics and social structure on the emergence of criminological thought.

CRIM 801-3 Theories of Crime II

Intensive exposure to the major streams of criminological theory. Topics for in-depth analysis will be selected according to the availability and interest of specific course instructors. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between ideas and social forces, as well as the interplay of theory and practice.

CRIM 810-3 The Phenomena of Crime I

Designed for the beginning graduate student, this course covers a wide variety of topics all of which deal with what we know about the phenomena of crime historically, temporally and geographically. This course will look at the patterns of crime and victimization, and will explore crime patterns at local, provincial, national and international levels. Known characteristics of specific forms of crime will be studied.

CRIM 811-3 The Phenomena of Crime II

Topics for in-depth analysis will be selected according to the availability and interest of specific course instructors and selected from but not limited to one or more of the following topics: historical criminology; the ecology of crime; environmental criminology; the media and crime; fear of crime; victimization; organized crime; or corporate crime.

CRIM 820-3 Criminal Justice Policy Analysis I

An introduction to policy development and policy analysis in the field of criminal justice, including a general review of the function of bureaucratic agencies in the public sector and the particular role of government ministries providing criminal justice services. Major topic areas include: organization theory; policy planning theory; decision theory; inter-governmental analysis as it applies to the administration of justice; and comparative analyses of criminal justice policies especially related to international or trans-national crime.

CRIM 821-3 Criminal Justice Policy Analysis II

Topics for in-depth analysis will be selected according to the availability and interest of specific course instructors and may be selected from any area of criminal justice practice including: law enforcement; the judiciary; court administration; corrections; or legal services. The course will emphasize the systems approach in criminal justice policy planning. Program evaluation techniques will be applied to the major types of planning and program initiatives taken within or across criminal justice systems.

CRIM 830-3 Law and Social Control I

An examination of the social utility of legal intervention in the instance of criminal law; the relationship between law and social order; and the process of law making and the social efficacy of specific criminal sanctions.

CRIM 831-3 Law and Social Control II

Topics for in-depth analysis will be selected according to the availability and interest of specific course instructors and selected from but not limited to one or more of the following themes: theoretical perspectives on punishment and social control; theoretical perspectives on policing; law and mental health; law and the environment; and law and gender.

CRIM 840-3 Proseminar

Examination of current theory and research by faculty in the School of Criminology.

CRIM 860-3 Research Methods I

The course will cover basic research design for criminological problems and basic techniques for the conduct of research in criminology and socio-legal study. The research methods covered will comprise both quantitative and qualitative techniques. The course is intended to establish fundamental research skills to be applied in advanced research methods seminars, in other core area courses, and in the preparation of theses and dissertations.

CRIM 861-3 Research Methods II

This course covers both parametric and non-parametric statistical techniques with an emphasis on parametric analysis. Basic descriptive and inferential statistics will be covered , including univariate measures, analyses of cross classified data, correlation, t-tests, analysis of variance, regression, and related measures. Also discussed are the experimental and statistical research strategies which produce those data. The approach will be conceptual and will emphasize the strengths, weaknesses, selection and application of various statistical, experimental and quasi-experimental techniques.

CRIM 862-3 Research Methods III

This course will address a range of research techniques generally subsumed under the rubric of `qualitative' research including field research, interview techniques, historical and legal research, and documentary analysis. Emphasis will be on the logic underlying such inquiry, the advantages and limitations associated with different sources of information and procedures, and the processes by which analytical rigour is achieved.

CRIM 863-3 Research Methods IV

Advanced topics, issues and techniques in criminological and socio-legal research. The subject matter of this course will vary according to instructor interests and specialization. Specific areas of concentration may include the following: advanced multivariate statistical techniques, documentary and historical methods, evaluative and predictive research, participant observation/ethnography, systems analysis, and computer simulation modelling. Prerequisite: CRIM 860, 861, 862, or by permission of the instructor.

CRIM 870-3 Directed Readings

Intensive readings under the supervision of a faculty member, in areas of interest related to the student's program.

CRIM 871-3 Selected Topics

Concentrated studies in areas of student specialization.

CRIM 872-3 Selected Topics

Concentrated studies in areas of student specialization.

CRIM 873-3 Selected Topics

Concentrated studies in areas of student specialization.

CRIM 898-0 MA Thesis
CRIM 899-0 PhD Thesis


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Index : searchable with the Find function in your web browser Calendar.pdfs Office of the Registrar / SFU
Table of Contents : searchable with the Find function in your web browser Course Database or Course Outlines
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Financial Assistance