SFU Calendar 2001-2002

Table of Contents : searchable with the Find function of your web browser Course Database or Course Outlines
(opens in new window)
Financial Assistance
Index : searchable with the Find function of your web browser Calendar .pdfs Office of the Registrar / SFU


Department of French


8108 Robert C. Brown Hall, (604) 2914740 Tel, (604) 2915932 Fax, www.sfu.ca/french

Chair

M.C. Fauquenoy LèsL, Dr3rdCy (Paris), Chev. Palmes Acad (France), FRSCan

Graduate Program Chair

S. Steele BA, MA (Br Col), PhD (Tor)

Faculty and Areas of Research

see "Department of French". for a complete list of faculty.

R. Canac-Marquis - transformational syntax, morpho-syntax, formal semantics, anaphora, second language acquisition

R. Davison - 18th century French literature, correspondence and pedagogy, women writers, emigré writers

M.C. Fauquenoy - French linguistics, sociolinguistics, Creole French dialects

G. Merler - modern French and Quebec literatures, methods of discourse analysis, Stendhal, individual psychology and literary analysis, poetry

G. Poirier - Renaissance French literature, 17th century French literature, Quebec literature and paraliterature, gender studies

S. Steele - Chrétien de Troyes, Medievalism and the Third Republic, French war writing, modern French poetry

J. Viswanathan - modern French and French Canadian novel, narrative theory, film and fiction

P. Wrenn - text linguistics, experimental phonetics, Canadian French, phonostylistics, phonology

The department offers graduate research leading to an MA, with a concentration in either French linguistics or French literature. Students interested in French as a second language (FSL) should contact the graduate program chair. (The FSL option will be of particular interest to candidates contemplating a career in the teaching of French.) Students seeking PhD program admission may apply under the special arrangements provisions of graduate general regulation 1.3.4.

The major areas of study are as follows.

Linguistics: Linguistic analysis of French, varieties of French (social, regional and stylistic variations), French Creoles, French linguistic theories, French applied linguistics, theoretical approaches to the acquisition of French as a second language. A variety of practical applications of linguistic theory may be envisaged: pedagogy, translation, stylistic analysis, etc.

Literature: This option offers a unique curriculum based on theoretical and interdisciplinary approaches to literature and para-literature: textual, discourse, genre analysis; cultural and gender studies; theory of literary criticism; psychological, sociological criticism, new trends in the history of movements and historical periods, topics in French Canadian literature.

MA Program

Conditions of Admission

Candidates for admission must satisfy the general admission requirements for graduate studies as show in Graduate General Regulations 1.3.2 (page 297) and 1.3.8 (page 298).

Program admission requires a sound background in French literature or French linguistics, as well as a good command of both oral and written French. Candidates lacking these must remedy the deficiency before admission is granted. This may be accomplished through one or two semesters as a qualifying student (Graduate General Regulation 1.3.5 page 298).

Upon admission, each student will be assigned a temporary supervisor.

The program's degree requirements may be completed `with thesis' or `without thesis.' In either case, the student works under a supervisory committee's direction (Graduate General Regulation 1.6 page 300) that has been appointed by the end of the second semester.

Students are normally admitted initially to the MA without thesis option. Those wishing to transfer to the MA with thesis option may do so after completion of their second semester in the program, on the recommendation of their supervisory committee, and subject to the approval of the graduate studies committee. Program requirements: course work, thesis topic or area of field examination, as well as any additional requirements, must be approved by the supervisory committee and the graduate studies committee.

Degree Requirements

The MA program has the following minimum requirements. During the first semester, students must successfully complete one of

FREN 800-2 Readings in French Linguistics

FREN 801-2 Readings in Literary Theory

plus, during the first or second semester, students must successfully complete

FREN 802-2 Basic Research Methods

Concentration Requirements

Students must successfully complete an additional 20 credit hours, selected from core and specialized courses for each concentration (either linguistics or literature).

Students may be required to complete additional courses to remedy deficiencies or to ensure suitable preparation for the thesis research proposed.

MA with Thesis

For this option, students complete a thesis of about 100 pages that is defended at an oral examination as described in Graduate General Regulations 1.9 (page 301) and 1.10 (page 302). Students must submit a written thesis proposal no later than one semester following the completion of course work. Substantive work on the thesis may proceed only after approval of the thesis proposal by the supervisory committee and the graduate studies committee.

MA without Thesis

This option requires successful completion of a further 10 credit hours of graduate work within the Department of French and a field examination based on three completed courses. These additional courses may be selected from either concentration. Preparation for the field examination will be undertaken on the advice of the supervisory committee.

Language Requirement

Students must demonstrate to the graduate program committee an acceptable level of competence in written and oral French and must show at least a reading knowledge of one language other than English or French that is acceptable to the supervisory committee. This requirement can be fulfilled by successfully completing two courses in that language or by passing an exam consisting of the translation of a 250 word text into English.

Graduate Courses
Core Courses

The following courses concern fundamental aspects (in literature and linguistics) of the field specialization. These are offered at least once every six semesters. Selection of and need to take any specific course(s) is made in consultation with the student's supervisor.

Linguistics

FREN 807-5 Problems in French Phonology

FREN 808-5 Problems in French Grammar

FREN 809-5 Problems in French Semantics and Lexicology

Literature

FREN 820-5 Types of Discourse

FREN 821-5 Theories and Methods of Literary Analysis

FREN 822-5 Socio-cultural Approaches to French Literature

Specialized Courses

The courses listed below treat specialized areas with respect to the student's particular interests or thesis topic. These courses are offered as needed to complete or enhance a student's program. Depending upon content and enrolment, they may be offered as directed readings or as seminars rather than lecture courses.

Linguistics/Applied Linguistics

FREN 811-5 Problems in French Dialectology

FREN 812-5 Problems in French Linguistic Theory

FREN 813-5 Problems in the History of French

FREN 814-5 Contrastive Structures of French and English

FREN 815-5 French Creoles

FREN 816-5 Sociolinguistic Approaches to French Studies

FREN 817-5 French Applied Linguistics

FREN 818-5 Phonostylistics of French

FREN 830-5 Canadian French

FREN 831-5 Studies of Bilingualism in the FrenchSpeaking World

FREN 832-5 Theoretical Approaches to the Acquisition of French as a Second Language

Literature

Topics in the following literature courses will vary to meet the interests of both students and faculty.

FREN 823-5 Interdisciplinary Approaches to French Literature

FREN 824-5 Topics in French Canadian Literature

FREN 825-5 Topics in French Literature

FREN 826-5 Monographic Studies

Note: With the supervisory committee's approval, one course from the other concentration may substitute, or one may be taken outside the department. For a linguistics concentration, those demonstrating adequate preparation in general linguistics may take a Department of Linguistics course. For a literature concentration, consider a course in the Department of English. For a French as a second language (FSL) concentration, course selection is subject to the graduate program committee's approval.

Joint Master in English and French Literatures

This joint master's program allows students who have already been trained in both literatures to continue studies beyond the undergraduate level.

Students register in and, if successful, receive a degree from one of two departments, known as the home department. The other department is designated the associate department.

Application for Admission

Students may apply to either department or to both, indicating a preference. Both departments must agree on the student's admission or on conditions for admission. A home department will be assigned in consultation with the student and with the agreement of both departments. A minimum of 15 upper division undergraduate credit hours in each discipline is required for admission. The student, after admission and two semesters of course work, will have the option of completing an MA either with thesis or without, subject to the agreement of both departments.

Supervision

The home department selects a joint supervisory committee of two faculty from the home department and one from the associate department.

Home Department Requirements

either both of

ENGL 810-5 Graduate Professional Development Seminar Part I

ENGL 811-5 Graduate Professional Development Seminar Part II

or both of

FREN 801-2 Readings in French Literature

FREN 802-2 Basic Research Methods

Concentration Requirements

In addition to the home department requirements shown above, students must also complete either the MA with thesis or without thesis option.

MA with Thesis

For this option, students successfully complete another 20 credit hours selected from literature courses in the Departments of French and English, including at least one course from each department (one course from one department and three from the other, or two from each department) and complete a thesis of about 100 pages on a topic acceptable to the supervisory committee, defended at an oral examination as described in Graduate General Regulations 1.9 (page 301) and 1.10 (page 302).

MA without Thesis

For this option, students successfully complete another 30 credit hours selected from literature courses in the Departments of French and English, including at least two courses from each department (two courses from one department and four from the other, or three from each department) and a written field exam based on three completed courses. Field exam preparation is undertaken on the advice of the supervisory committee.

Graduate Courses

FREN 800-2 Readings in French Linguistics

A semester of required readings in French linguistic theory. This course, which culminates in an oral examination, will be graded satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

FREN 801-2 Readings in French Literature

A semester of required readings in French literary theory. This course, which culminates in an oral examination, will be graded satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

FREN 802-2 Basic Research Methods

The study of research methods and tools used in French linguistics or French literature. Planning a long term research project.

FREN 807-5 Problems in French Phonology

Explores a selection of classic problems of French phonology from different theoretical viewpoints.

FREN 808-5 Problems in French Grammar

Explores a selection of classic problems of French morphology, morpho-syntax and/or syntax from different theoretical viewpoints.

FREN 809-5 Problems in French Semantics and Lexicology

Theories, methods and major research trends in the diachronic and/or synchronic analysis of the lexicon and structures of meaning in French.

FREN 811-5 Problems in French Dialectology

Methods in the study of social and geographical dialects (from fieldwork techniques to the analysis of data). Linguistic theory (traditional, structural, generative and sociolinguistic) as it applies to French dialectology.

FREN 812-5 Problems in French Linguistic Theory

Studies the contributions of a selection of twentieth century French language linguists to the evolution of various aspects of linguistics and linguistic theory.

FREN 813-5 Problems in the History of French

A diachronic study of a variety of phonological, grammatical or lexical aspects of French presenting descriptive/explanatory challenges.

FREN 814-5 Contrastive Structures of French and English

A contrastive study of the grammatical structures of French and English with emphasis on `rank-shift' across discourse techniques. A variety of practical applications may be envisaged: pedagogy, translation, stylistic analysis, etc.

FREN 815-5 French Creoles

Development, diversity and sociality of French Creoles. Theoretical approaches to the study of the life cycle of creole languages, with special emphasis on French-based Creoles.

FREN 816-5 Sociolinguistic Approaches to French Studies

Language, society and identity in France. Study of social markers in speech, conversational rules, objective versus subjective norms, attitudes towards language variation and their implications among French speakers from an integrative perspective.

FREN 817-5 French Applied Linguistics

Study of the contribution of linguistic theory to the teaching and learning of French as a second language.

FREN 818-5 Phonostylistics of French

The linguistic analysis of paralinguistic features of French and their expressivity in various types of oral discourse.

FREN 820-5 Types of Discourse

A study of the language in use, discourse strategies, the enunciation devices of various types of texts, both traditional and non-traditional genres such as oral or para-literary texts.

FREN 821-5 Theories and Methods of Literary Analysis

A study of a selection of significant works by contemporary French critics (Barthes, Genette, Kristeva). The application of their theories and models to the analysis of specific works. May concentrate on one area, e.g. narratology, semiotics, etc.

FREN 822-5 Socio-cultural Approaches to French Literature

Provides a framework for a detailed study of French literature within its socio-cultural context.

FREN 823-5 Interdisciplinary Approaches to French Literature

Explores the relationships between French literature and other arts or applies concepts and models developed in other disciplines to the study of French literature.

FREN 824-5 Topics in French Canadian Literature

An in-depth study of a theme or an aspect of French Canadian Literature through different literary works.

FREN 825-5 Topics in French Literature

An in-depth study of a topic relating to a period or a movement in French literary history, such as: Middle Ages, Renaissance, Classical Period, Enlightenment, Romanticism, Realism, Naturalism, Existentialism.

FREN 826-5 Monographic Studies

An in-depth study of one writer from a specific theoretical perspective (psychological, historical, linguistic).

FREN 830-5 Canadian French

Advanced study of the linguistic structures and sociolinguistic rules of French in Canada.

FREN 831-5 Studies of Bilingualism in the French-Speaking World

Theories of bilingualism as they apply to French, and the place of French in the world.

FREN 832-5 Theoretical Approaches to the Acquisition of French as a Second Language

New trends and theoretical developments in the acquisition of French as a second language.

FREN 898-0 MA Thesis
FREN 999-0 Field Examination


Please email the Webmaster with any comments or problems with this website. Calendar Home Page Simon Fraser University
8888 University Drive
Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6
Canada
1-778.782.3224
Index : searchable with the Find function in your web browser Calendar.pdfs Office of the Registrar / SFU
Table of Contents : searchable with the Find function in your web browser Course Database or Course Outlines
(opens in new window)
Financial Assistance