SFU Calendar 2001-2002

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Gerontology Program


2800 Harbour Centre, (604) 2915065 Tel, (604) 2915066 Fax, gero@sfu.ca, www.harbour.sfu.ca/gero/

Graduate Program Chair

A.V. Wister BA, MA, PhD (WOnt)

Faculty and Areas of Research

G.M. Gutman - seniors' housing, long term care, dementia, health promotion and aging, program evaluation

B. Mitchell* - families and aging, intergenerational relations, youth transitions, social policy

A.V. Wister - demography, living arrangements and social supports, health promotion and population health, program evaluation

*joint appointment with sociology and anthropology

Advisor

Ms. N. Holtby, 2800 Harbour Centre, 778.782 5065

The Gerontology Program offers a master of arts degree. There are two concentrations offered within the program: aging and the built environment, and health promotion/population health and aging. The MA program prepares students for professional roles with a high level of current knowledge of the field, and substantial competence in the kinds of research tasks necessary to undertake those roles. It also provides focused, interdisciplinary training for individuals in occupations that provide services to older adults. Further, the program will develop an appreciation of the complex ethical issues that are faced by persons working in gerontology.

Each of the concentrations deals with specific problems and issues.

The aging and the built environment concentration trains students in the planning, design, research and evaluation of working, living and recreational environments for older persons. Students in this concentration will have backgrounds in architecture, interior design, urban and regional planning, social/human ecology, kinesiology, recreation and leisure studies, occupational therapy, physiotherapy, human factors, human geography, sociology or environmental or social psychology.

The health promotion/population health and aging concentration provides knowledge that can be used for research, evaluation and critical analysis of our health care system and of specific health promotion strategies. Students with degrees in psychology, sociology, demography, medical geography, social work, nursing, health education, physiotherapy, and physical education or kinesiology would be probable candidates for this concentration.

Students take an integrated core course sequence and courses specific to the selected concentration. The program builds upon the expertise, research activities and international reputation of the associated Gerontology Research Centre.

MA Program

Admission

Students interested in applying to this program should contact the student advisor for application forms and information. Candidates who have not completed the post baccalaureate diploma program in gerontology or a minimum of five upper level courses with substantial aging content may be advised to complete courses from the diploma program prior to applying to the MA program. Applications for fall admission should be completed by January 30 of that year and applications for spring admission by September 30 of the previous year.

Applicants are required to forward an application for graduate studies form, a cheque or money order for $55 (Canadian) made payable to Simon Fraser University, official copies of their transcripts along with three letters of reference, a statement of research interests (500-600 words), a statement of work experience in gerontology and a completed curriculum vitae information form.

The following prerequisites, or their equivalent, are needed for each concentration.

Aging and the Built Environment

GERO 401-3 Aging and the Built Environment

Health Promotion and Aging

GERO 404-3 Health and Illness in Later Life

and one of

GERO 302-3 Health Promotion and Aging*

GERO 402-3 Drug Issues in Gerontology

GERO 403-3 Counselling with Older Adults

GERO 407-3 Nutrition and Aging

*formerly offered as GERO 411 Special Topics: Health Promotion and Aging

Curriculum and Description

There are five components to the program: core courses, required courses for each concentration, electives, project or thesis and internship.

Students must complete six courses: two core courses, two required courses from the chosen concentration, and two electives. They must also complete a project. Under special circumstances, students may complete a thesis in lieu of the project (see Project or Thesis Option below).

Core Courses

These courses will be required of all students.

GERO 801-4 Health Policy and Applied Issues in Gerontology

GERO 802-4 Development and Evaluation of Health Promotion Programs for Older Persons

Students who complete a thesis will also complete the following course or any other approved graduate research methods course (also recommended for project stream students) (see Project or Thesis Option below).

GERO 803-4 Analytical Techniques for Gerontological Research

Areas of Concentration Requirements

These courses are required of students within each concentration.

Aging and the Built Environment

GERO 810-4 Community Based Housing for Older People

GERO 811-4 Institutional Living Environments

Health Promotion/Population Health and Aging

GERO 820-4 Principles and Practices of Health Promotion

GERO 821-4 Epidemiology of Aging

Elective Courses

Students may fulfil elective credit requirements by selecting from the following courses, completing required courses from another gerontology concentration, or from outside the program if approved by the student's graduate advisory committee.

GERO 830-4 Human Factors, Technology and Safety

GERO 840-4 Special Topics in Gerontology

GERO 889-4 Directed Studies

GERO 898 MA Project

GERO 899 MA Thesis

SA 886-5 Selected Problems in Social Analysis*

*when offered as Social Policy in a Changing Society

Project or Thesis Option

All students will be initially admitted into the project stream and will normally present a written project proposal to a faculty member, chosen as a supervisor. After consultation with the project supervisor, a second member is selected to complete the supervisory committee. Examples of projects include: evaluation of programs for older adults; design and implementation of environments or services for elderly persons; and analyses of secondary data. A project report will be evaluated by the supervisory committee and a qualified external reader. The project requirement must meet the guidelines set out in the Graduate General Regulations (page 297).

A small number of highly qualified students who wish to prepare for advanced graduate training may be permitted to elect a thesis option after one semester in the program. Students allowed to complete a thesis will replace the two elective courses with GERO 803. The thesis provides a focused research of high quality. Students will be encouraged to engage in original and innovative research to meet this requirement. Committee selection and approval of the thesis proposal will follow the same steps as the project. The thesis requirement must meet the guidelines in the Graduate General Regulations (page 297).

Internship

Students lacking relevant work experience will be required to supplement their program of study with an internship. The student will work for an agency or organization in a position of responsibility normally for a maximum of one semester.

Graduate Courses

GERO 801-4 Health Policy and Applied Issues in Gerontology

The aim of this course is to examine linkages between long term care and other service sectors as well as to compare programs and services across community, provincial and national boundaries. A number of key policy issues will be discussed that pertain to the provision of health related services to older adults.

GERO 802-4 Development and Evaluation of Health Promotion Programs for the Elderly

This course deals with the design, implementation and evaluation of health promotion programs and services for older persons. Students will participate in the development and critical analysis of a variety of health initiatives aimed at healthful aging.

GERO 803-4 Analytical Techniques for Gerontological Research

This course has been specifically designed to provide training in quantitative data analysis using SPSSx Programming Language with a focus on behavioural research problems in gerontology.

GERO 810-4 Community Based Housing for Older People

This course presents an indepth examination of theory, research and policy related to planning, designing, developing and managing housing for independent and semi-independent older adults.

GERO 811-4 Institutional Living Environments

This course focuses on design issues, theory, research and policy relevant to planning, developing and managing institutional living environments for dependent adults.

GERO 820-4 Principles and Practices of Health Promotion

This course is designed to cover and critically evaluate concepts, models and theories of health promotion and wellness in the aging population. These methods of implementation will be discussed in relation to individual and structural health system issues facing the aged.

GERO 821-4 Epidemiology of Aging

This course is required for students in the health promotion and aging concentration. It examines epidemiological methods and approaches to the study of aging and the care of the aged. Students will survey and critically evaluate current epidemiological literature addressing health and health care issues associated with individual and population aging.

GERO 830-4 Human Factors, Technology and Safety

This course covers theoretical, research and industry literature pertaining to designing home, work, institutional and public environments that are ergonomically functional, safe, and satisfying to the older adult.

GERO 840-4 Special Topics in Georontology

This course offers an opportunity to offer a specialized course in an area germane to the program but on a topic that is outside of the regular courses.

GERO 850-0 Co-op Internship

The internship consists of one full-time work semester. Arrangements for the work semesters are made through the Faculty of Arts Co-op Co-ordinator at least one semester in advance. For further details, students should refer to the Co-operative Education section of the Calendar. Prerequisite: MA students in good standing with a minimum GPA of 3.0 may apply to enter the co-op internship after satisfactory completion of 16 semester hours credit.

GERO 889-4 Directed Studies

This course consists of supervised readings in a particular field of specialization relevant to the selected area of concentration.

GERO 898-0 MA Project

A project must be written under committee supervision for formal examination as part of the program requirements for students in the project stream.

GERO 899-0 MA Thesis

A thesis must be written under committee supervision for formal examination as part of the progrm requirements for students in the thesis stream.



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Index : searchable with the Find function in your web browser Calendar.pdfs Office of the Registrar / SFU
Table of Contents : searchable with the Find function in your web browser Course Database or Course Outlines
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Financial Assistance