SFU Calendar 2001-2002

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Financial Assistance
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Faculty of Business Administration


Dean

(to be announced)

Associate Deans

L.N. Meredith BA, MA, PhD (S Fraser)

B.H. Reich BA, MSc, PhD (Br Col)

Faculty and Areas of Research

see "Faculty of Business Administration". for a complete list of faculty.

M.F. Abdel Magid - accounting

N.A.R. Abramson - international business, comparative management

A. Bick - investments and asset pricing

G.W. Blazenko - business finance

M.J. Brydon - management information systems

G.R. Bushe - organizational development, strategic human resource management

E.W. Bukszar, Jr. - business strategy, business, government and society

J.C-W. Chang - marketing

E.U. Choo - management science

P.M. Clarkson - accounting

C.M. Collins-Dodd - retailer decision-making, price expectations

K.T. Dirks - organizational behavior

A. Duncan - accounting

B.J. Edwards - accounting

C.P. Egri - organizational power and politics, innovation, leadership

C.E.N. Emby - accounting

M. Favere-Marchesi - accounting

D.R. Finley - accounting

M.R. Fizzell - accounting

J.N.P. Francis - international and strategic marketing, negotiations, advertising

A.M.G. Gelardi - accounting

A.C. Gemino - management information systems

I.M. Gordon - accounting

R.R. Grauer - business finance

J.W. Heaney - business finance

P.C. Klein - business finance

R. Krider - marketing

B.A. Lautsch - industrial relations, human resource management

C.E. Love - management science

G.A. Mauser - marketing

N. MacKay - management information systems

H. Merchant - international business

L.N. Meredith - business marketing, marketing strategy

D.C. Parker - decision support systems

D.L. Patient - business communication

L.T. Pinfield - organization behavior, organization policy

G. Poitras - international finance, econometrics, financial Institutions

B.H. Reich - management of the information technology function, strategic information systems, qualitative research

J.G. Richards - business, government and society

R.W. Schwindt* - industrial organization; international trade; business, government and society

D.M. Shapiro - industrial organizations, managerial economics, business and public policy

J.P. Sheppard - business policy, corporate failure and survival

C.F. Smart - business policy, organizational behaviour

K.G. Stewart - business communication

D.C. Thomas - international business

R.L. Tung - international business

K.E. Vandezande - business finance

A.R. Vining - business policy, business government and society

A.R. Warburton - management science

J.H. Waterhouse - accounting

W.C. Wedley - international business, operations management

M.N. Wexler - business, government and society, organizational behavior and theory

R.G. Wyckham - marketing

R.A Yates - commercial law

J.L. Zaichkowsky - marketing

C.E. Zietsma - business strategy, entrepreneurship

*joint appointment with economics

Graduate Diploma Offered

Business Administration

Graduate Degree Offered

Master of Business Administration

Graduate Programs Offered

The Faculty of Business Administration offers three programs leading to the MBA degree; the executive MBA program, the MBA program and the management of technology MBA program.

The executive MBA program is a weekend or weeknight program for mid-career managers or executives who want to continue working while studying in a collegial environment. The program takes a general management perspective; it focuses on organizational and decision-making processes that cut across functional divisions.

The specialized MBA program is a daytime program designed primarily for recent graduates who desire more concentrated exposure to a specific field of business study and development of applied research skills. Recent graduates with a business degree move directly to study an area of specialization.

The master of business administration (management of techology) was offered as a pilot program under special arrangements in 2000. The program is now in the final stages of full program approval by the provincial government. The program is expected to be officially approved later this year and offered as a regular ongoing program commencing in 2002.

Graduate Diploma in Business Administration

7200 Harbour Centre, 515 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC, V6B 5K3, 778.782.5256 Tel, 778.782 -5153 Fax, www.gdba.sfu.ca

Academic Director

B.H. Reich BA, MSc, PhD (Br Col)

Executive Director

T. Brown, 7200 Harbour Centre, 778.782 5255

The graduate diploma in business administration (GDBA) provides core business skills to the working professional who has earned an undergraduate degree in a discipline other than business. Delivered by the Internet over three semesters, the GDBA is a convenient and practical alternative for those who are unable to attend a traditional classroom-based program.

The GDBA is shorter and more concentrated than an MBA, covering the core of most MBA programs. The GDBA provides the firm foundation of business skills necessary to successfully compete in today's job market.

Although completion of the GDBA will satisfy the business degree requirement necessary for the Simon Fraser University MBA application, please be advised that satisfactory completion of the GDBA will not guarantee admission to the MBA program. Admission in the MBA program requires an applicant to meet all of the criteria set by each MBA program.

Admission

The basic entry qualification is a degree from a recognized university in an area other than business administration, commerce or the equivalent. A university level course in mathematics is required. We require three letters of reference preferably from supervisors or former professors. Candidates are expected to be reasonably computer literate, and familiar with the Internet. The Simon Fraser University GDBA requires a strong command of the English language. Applications are processed as they arrive. Early submission of all required materials will enable the admissions committee to assess the student's file expeditiously. Highly qualified applicants may be admitted early into the program.

Application

Candidates must submit the following documentation when applying to the program.

Financial Assistance

The Bank of Montreal offers a student line of credit for Canadian citizens and landed immigrants. Loan information and application packages are available from the GDBA office. Eligible students may also apply to the Canada Student Loan program in their province of residents. (The GDBA is considered a full time program by the Canada Student Loan program.)

Diploma Requirements

To qualify for the graduate diploma in business administration, students must complete a total of 24 credit hours drawn from the following courses.

BUS 550-2 Financial Accounting

BUS 551-2 Managerial Accounting

BUS 552-4 Managerial Economics

BUS 553-2 Quantitative Business Methods

BUS 554-2 Management Information Systems

BUS 555-4 Managerial Finance

BUS 556-4 Marketing Management

BUS 557-4 Human Resource Management/Organizational Behavior

BUS 558-3 Special Topics*

BUS 559-4 Special Topics*

*requires prior permission of the academic director

Graduate Diploma Courses
BUS 550-2 Financial Accounting

Concepts and principles in financial accounting from the user perspective.

BUS 551-2 Managerial Accounting

The use of accounting information for managerial decisions. Prerequisite: BUS 550 or equivalent.

BUS 552-4 Managerial Economics

Applications of economic theory to business problems.

BUS 553-2 Quantitative Business Methods

The use of quantitative or statistical techniques in managerial decision making.

BUS 554-2 Management Information Systems

The design and implementation of information systems to provide appropriate and timely information to management.

BUS 555-4 Managerial Finance

An overview of investment and financing decisions of the firm, including valuation, capital expenditures, financial markets, dividend and financial policy. Prerequisite: BUS 550 and 553 or equivalent.

BUS 556-4 Marketing Management

An introduction to the application of pricing, promotion, channel selection and product planning to marketing decisions.

BUS 557-4 Human Relations Management/Organization Behavior

Issues in the behavior of people in organizations, and human resource management practices that influence employee behavior.

BUS 558-3 Special Topics
BUS 559-4 Special Topics
BUS 560-2,3,4 Directed Studies

Prerequisite: requires prior permission of the academic director.

Specialist MBA Program

2323 Lohn Building, 778.782 3639 Tel, 778.782 3404 Fax, www.bus.sfu.ca

Director

J.L. Zaichkowsky BHE (Br Col), MSc (Guelph), PhD (Calif)

Advisor

Ms. N. Lalji, program co-ordinator, 2323 Lohn Building, 778.782 3639 Tel, 778.782 3404 Fax

The MBA program has a subject specialization focus in the following fields of specialization.

accounting*

finance

management and organization studies

International business

management science/information systems

marketing

policy analysis*

*not available in 2001

Additional fields of specialization are available with the approval of the student's supervisory committee. For example, students can take supporting courses in such disciplines as resource management, economics, computing science, criminology, and engineering science.

Admission

For admission, a student must have a bachelor's degree from a recognized university with a concentration in business administration (or its equivalent). The student should have normally completed course work in differential calculus,* statistics, managerial economics (or micro economics), accounting, management science (or operations research), finance, marketing, human resource management, and business policy (or business and society). Students admitted without all of these courses may be required to make up the deficiency without graduate credit.

The maximum number of students directly admitted in any one year to an area of concentration is expected to be 30. The minimum undergraduate grade point average required for admission is 3.0 (or equivalent). Criteria for admission, in addition to undergraduate grades, include acceptable scores on the GMAT test (see Application below), strong letters of reference, and for students whose native language is not English, acceptable TOEFL scores (570 minimum) and a score of 5 or above on the test of written English.

The program is designed for students with an undergraduate business/commerce degree. Students may begin in September, January or May. Courses are sequenced through the three semesters: fall, spring and summer. The normal course load is three courses per semester. In this manner, it is possible to complete the program in one year; although many students require four semesters to finish their research project. Students choosing the thesis option and/or a co-op term(s) may expect to take one additional semester in order to complete BUS 900. The completion time for a student holding a teaching assistantship over their whole program is typically five semesters.

*Integral calculus is also required for specializations in finance, management science and information systems, and marketing. It is recommended for specialization in accounting.

Application

Students must submit the following documentation when applying.

Financial Assistance

The Faculty can offer most qualified graduate students a teaching assistantship in business administration. Remuneration is normally $3,800 per semester. In addition to teaching assistantships, members of faculty, from time to time, have funding available to hire research assistants. A number of graduate fellowships are available to students who demonstrate high academic performance. see "Financial Aid for Graduate Students". for information on other university scholarships and awards available to graduate students.

Degree Requirements

To qualify for the MBA degree, the candidate must complete the requirements under one of two available options: project option or thesis option.

For the project option, students complete a minimum of three courses in a field of concentration, a minimum of one course in a supporting field, and one course in research techniques. Eight courses are required for the project option. Of these, four must be supporting or research courses. In addition, students must complete a written research project equivalent to one course. A project will generally represent successful original research regarding some practical problem. While students are expected to conduct a literature search regarding the problem, it will generally be less exhaustive in comparison with that of the thesis. The scope of a project is regarded as equivalent to one graduate course.

For the thesis option, students complete a minimum of three courses in a field of concentration as well as at least one course in research techniques and BUS 900, Research Methodology. Six courses are required in the thesis option. In addition, students must complete a written research thesis equivalent to three courses. In general, a thesis represents a major research effort in which the student, working closely with the supervisory committee, demonstrates a comprehensive knowledge of the literature on some aspect of a discipline and successfully completes original research which represents a contribution to knowledge in the area.

The requirements and options for each of the areas are detailed below.

Fields of Concentration: three course minimum
Accounting

BUS 871-4 Seminar in Financial Accounting

BUS 872-4 Seminar in Managerial Accounting

BUS 874-4 Advanced Topics in Accounting

Finance

BUS 815-4 Portfolio Theory

BUS 817-4 Theory of Capital Markets

BUS 818-4 Advanced Topics in Business Finance

International Business

BUS 862-4 Contemporary Topics in International Business

BUS 882-4 Doing Business with the Pacific Rim Countries

BUS 883-4 International Business and Multinational Enterprises

BUS 884-4 Comparative Management

BUS 885-4 International Human Resource Management

BUS 886-4 Management of International Firms

BUS 887-4 Entry Strategies for International Markets

Management and Organization Studies

BUS 831-4 Industrial Relations

BUS 836-4 Human Resource Practices for managers

BUS 837-4 Effective Leadership and Management in Organization

BUS 839-4 Organizational Assessment and Planned Change

Management Science and Information Systems

BUEC 819-4 Mathematical Programming for Economics and Business

BUEC 820-4 Analysis of Dynamic Processes

BUEC 823-4 Business and Economic Forecasting

BUS 822-4 Decision Theory

BUS 876-4 Decision Support Systems

BUS 904 Selected Topics in Business Administration

BUS 905 Selected Topics in Business Administration

Marketing

BUS 845-4 Marketing Measurement

BUS 846-4 Marketing Theory and Models

BUS 847-4 Advanced Consumer Behavior

BUS 848-4 Research in Marketing Strategy

Policy Analysis

BUS 850-4 Theoretical Issues in Strategic Management

BUS 852-4 Researching the Corporation in Canadian Society

BUS 854-4 Business and Government Regulation

BUS 858-4 Business and the Public Interest

BUS 860-4 Administration of Public Enterprises

Supporting Courses

The academic supervisor, in consultation with the student, selects supporting courses, either from business administration or from other fields of study (e.g., economics, resource management, computing science, psychology).

Research Courses

Project option students take at least one course in research techniques (BUS 801 or equivalent). Thesis option students take BUS 900 in addition to a minimum of one course in research techniques.

The academic supervisor, in consultation with the student, selects research courses. Students taking BUS 900 should complete their other research courses first.

Co-operative Education Program

This option is available to qualified MBA students at the Burnaby campus. The goal of the coop component is to give students applied experience so that they can link concepts with practice, and advance their career opportunities.

Admission

Students must be admitted to the MBA program before applying for the coop option and must have a CGPA and previous semester GPA of at least 3.0. Students must maintain these grade levels to continue in the MBA coop option.

Students entering the MBA program with a business/commerce degree must complete a minimum of one semester with at least two courses at the 800 level before beginning a co-op practicum.

Course Requirements

To qualify for an MBA with a cooperative education designation, students must complete two coop practicum semesters (BUS 725 and 726) and satisfy other MBA graduation requirements. These work terms are normally interlaced with study semesters. Students complete the MBA coop option with a study semester.

A pass/fail evaluation is assigned for each coop practicum course by a coop coordinator. The grade is based on an evaluation of a work term report and assessment of the student's work by both the supervisor and coop coordinator.

MBA Courses
BUS 725-0 MBA Co-op Practicum I

First semester of work experience. This course is open only to MBA students. The co-op education program co-ordinators must be contacted prior to registration for this course. Prerequisite: students must be enrolled as a graduate student in the MBA program, and must have a CGPA and previous SGPA of at least 3.0. Students entering the MBA program with a degree other than in business normally must complete all 500 level courses before beginning a co-op practicum. Students entering the MBA program with a business/commerce degree must complete a minimum of one semester with at least two courses at the 800 level before beginning a co-op practicum.

BUS 726-0 MBA Co-op Practicum II

This is the second semester of work experience. This course is open only to MBA students. The co-op education program co-ordinators must be contacted prior to registration for this course. Prerequisite: BUS 725. Students must be enrolled as a graduate student in the MBA program, and must have a CGPA and previous SGPA of at least 3.0.

BUS 801-4 Research Techniques

The design, conduct, and analysis of business research including both field and laboratory research methods. Prerequisite: BUEC 333, or permission of the instructor.

BUS 815-4 Portfolio Theory

A study of optimum portfolio selections and diversification of financial assets including cash vis-a-vis different classes of utility functions of final wealth. Also, an examination of the behavior of speculative prices and rates of return. Prerequisite: ECON 331. Offered once a year. This is the same course as ECON 815.

BUS 817-4 Theory of Capital Markets

A study of capital market equilibrium theories, risk allocation, valuation models under perfect and imperfect markets and their empirical testing. Prerequisite: ECON 331, 835. Offered once a year. This is the same course as ECON 817.

BUS 818-4 Advanced Topics in Business Finance

Extensions of advanced topics beyond those covered in BUEC 815 and 817. Prerequisite: BUEC 815, 817. This is the same course as ECON 818.

BUS 822-4 Decision Theory

An examination of prescriptive (Bayesian) theory of decision making under uncertainty and critical investigation of the theory. Prerequisite: BUEC 333, MATH 157, or permission of the instructor.

BUS 831-4 Industrial Relations

Negotiation, arbitration, collective agreements, work stoppages, labor-management co-operation.

BUS 836-4 Human Resource Practices for Managers

This course is focused on understanding how organizations can build, maintain, and compensate their pool of employees. Topics include recruitment and selection practices, compensation and incentive systems and diversty management.

BUS 837-4 Effective Leadership and Management in Organizations

Effective leadership is essential in modern organizations. This course provides an overview of leadership theories, principles and practices. An experimental learning approach is used to develop students' leadership skills and competencies.

BUS 839-4 Organizational Assessment and Planned Change

Current theory, research and practice in organizational diagnosis and planned change. Prerequisite: advanced undergraduate course work in micro and macro organizational behavior.

BUS 845-4 Marketing Measurement

The generation and analysis of non-accounting information from sources both internal and external to the firm, with the purpose of understanding the use of such measurements in marketing segmentation. Prerequisite: BUS 801.

BUS 846-4 Marketing Theory and Models

The construction, analysis and application of models of marketing phenomena. Prerequisite: BUS 801.

BUS 847-4 Advanced Consumer Behavior

A study of the results of consumer interactions with the forces affecting purchase decisions. The influence of environmental, corporate, and governmental factors on consumer behavior and the processes of consumer decision-making will be examined. Prerequisite: BUS 347, 801 or permission of the instructor.

BUS 848-4 Research in Marketing Strategy

Research in strategy integrates marketing models, competitive marketing theories, and marketing strategic analysis. Cases and computer simulations may be used to demonstrate competitive strategic decisions. Prerequisite: BUS 801.

BUS 850-4 Theoretical Issues in Strategic Management

This course investigates the theoretical basis of strategic management particularly in the areas of strategic decision making, formulation and implementation. Prerequisite: BUS 578 or equivalent.

BUS 852-4 Researching the Corporation in Canadian Society

Research in contemporary theory and methods of investigating and conducting scientific research in Canadian corporations.

BUS 854-4 Business and Government Regulation

The theory and practice of public policy in the area of industrial organization. Topics include anti-combines, utility regulation, patent policy, and other policies directed at market failure. Prerequisite: ECON 200, or permission of the instructor.

BUS 858-4 Business and the Public Interest

Society requires business to act in the `public interest' by means both of explicit (legislated) rules and implicit social contracts. This course deals with these social contracts and will include discussions of employment policies, investment policies, charitable donations, environmental concerns and community service.

BUS 860-4 Administration of Public Enterprises

History, models of organizations of public corporations and their divergence from private counterparts. Public accountability decision-making, cost-benefit theories.

BUS 862-4 Contemporary Topics in International Business

The analysis of specific issues in international business/multinational firms, Canada's regulations, international financial management, international marketing, international operations, foreign investment and the international environment.

BUS 871-4 Seminar in Financial Accounting

An in-depth analysis of current literature in financial accounting theory and practice. Emphasis will be placed on recent empirical research. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

BUS 872-4 Seminar in Managerial Accounting

An integrative course intended to develop an appreciation of the interrelationship of managerial accounting and analytical, behavioral and technological considerations in analysis and design of control systems. Emphasis will be placed on empirical research. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

BUS 873-4 Tax Strategy for Managers

The course will provide an overview of how taxes affect business decisions. The students will be exposed to a variety of managerial strategic decision topics which require a knowledge of taxes in order that optimal decisions can be made. Topics to be included will be: entity planning, capital sturcture, compensation planning, pensions, markets and arbitrage, international operations and executive personal tax planning.

BUS 874-4 Advanced Topics in Accounting

Selected advanced topics in accounting. A continuation of 871 and 872 with emphasis on the interrelation between financial and managerial accounting. Particular attention will be devoted to present and developing problem areas and the research related to those problems. Prerequisite: BUS 871 and 872, or permission of the instructor.

BUS 876-4 Decision Support Systems

Design and application of computer-based information systems to support managerial decision making in organizations.

BUS 882-4 Doing Business with the Pacific Rim Countries

The course seeks to examine the opportunities and challenges of doing business with the Pacific Rim countries. Topics include the analysis of foreign investment climate, business negotiations and marketing strategies. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

BUS 883-4 International Business and Multinational Enterprises

The course identifies theories, information and research findings which are useful in understanding different aspects of managing multinational operations, such as foreign investment, organization and control. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

BUS 884-4 Comparative Management

The course compares and contrasts similarities and differences in management styles and practices across countries. It seeks to develop an appreciation of what it is like to work with people from other cultures. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

BUS 885-4 International Human Resource Management

The course seeks to identify how cultural differences affect the practice of international human resource management; and to understand the linkage between international human resource strategy, organizational structure and corporate strategy. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

BUS 886-4 Management of International Firms

This course deals with strategic requirements for the management of multinational corporations. Firm-specific and institutional challenges facing global managers in formulating and implementing profitable strategies are also discussed. Prerequisite: BUS 883.

BUS 887-4 Entry Strategies for International Markets

Product-market entry decisions as well as choices on foreign market entry mode (exports, licensing, direct investment, etc.) are discussed. This course also deals with co-operate alliances in international business. Prerequisite: BUS 883.

BUS 897-4 Directed Readings

Supervised reading and report preparation in a particular field of specialization.

BUS 898-0 MBA Thesis
BUS 900-4 Methodology Seminar/Research Workshop

This course, which will meet twice weekly, will devote one half to an examination of methodological approaches including selection, planning and conduct of research and philosophy of science and one half to attendance at faculty and graduate student workshop presentations. The methodology section of the course is intended to place students' research methodology in a broader context for critical evaluation. The workshop section will require students to present their own research finding for critical evaluation. Prerequisite: completion of prior required research courses, or permission of the instructor.

BUS 901-4 Selected Topics in Business Administration
BUS 902-4 Selected Topics in Business Administration
BUS 903-4 Selected Topics in Business
BUS 904-4 Selected Topics in Business
BUS 905-4 Selected Topics in Business Administration
BUS 906-4 Selected Topics in Business Administration
BUS 907-4 Selected Topics in Business
BUS 908-4 Selected Topics in Business
BUS 909-4 Selected Topics in Business
BUS 910-4 Selected Topics in Business
BUS 999-0 MBA Project

Executive MBA Program

2400 Harbour Centre, 778.782 5013 Tel, 778.782 5122 Fax, www.harbour.sfu.ca/EMBA, emba_program@sfu.ca

Academic Director

Dr. A. Vining, 2400 Harbour Centre, 778.782 5249

Executive Director

Ms. S. Burns, 2400 Harbour Centre, 778.782 5013

This program offers the skills, insights and frameworks that experienced, high potential managers need to prepare for their next career phase. The program takes a general management perspective, focusing on organizational and decision-making processes that cut across functional divisions. It is designed to expand potential and develop the strategic and global perspective required of tomorrow's senior managers. Using a cohort model where students take courses in the same sequence, the program encourages student interaction and co-operation; study groups and project teams are an important aspect of the learning experience.

Because executive MBA students pursue full time careers, classes meet either two nights a week (weeknight program) or alternate weekends all day Friday and Saturday (weekend residential program). Classes are held at Simon Fraser University at Harbour Centre, located in downtown Vancouver. Students in the weekend residential program have Friday night accommodation provided as part of tuition for the fall and spring semesters. Students take two courses or two and one half courses per semester, completing the course work in two years. Both programs begin in September. There is a three week semester break except for the summer when the break is at least one month. Immediately following acceptance in May, all students participate in a preparatory skills module that includes Numeracy and the Electronic Toolkit. At the same time, students with no microeconomics training should review our recommended self study guide.

Admission

Applicants will be considered for admission to the program based on the following criteria.

*While priority will be given to applicants with a university degree or a professional designation, a limited number of applicants may be admitted who do not hold a formal degree but possess exceptional business management qualifications.

The application deadline is April 15 for September enrolment in the same year. In order to have your application reviewed for the September enrolment, you must have written the GMAT by April 1.

All students must demonstrate proficiency in mathematics and analytical writing. Students may prepare for the program by developing the following proficiencies: computer skills, using a PC in a Windows environment with Microsoft Word and Excel applications; reading and comprehension skills; and business and report writing.

For more information, phone 778.782 5013, fax 778.782 5122, email emba_program@sfu.ca or see our website at www.harbour.sfu.ca/EMBA.

Degree Requirements

Students must complete 13 courses, one of which is an elective, with a minimum B (3.0 GPA) average grade, and should expect to spend 25-30 hours a week on their studies.

Electives in the past two years have included: negotiation/conflict resolution; managing new ventures; international business; global operations and the impact of E-commerce; managing corporate change; and leadership and group development.

In place of the 600 level MBA courses listed below, students may substitute, with the prior consent of the executive MBA graduate program committee, equivalent graduate course work from any Simon Fraser department. Prior approval is not required to substitute 800 level BUS or BUEC courses as electives. In extraordinary circumstances, and with prior executive MBA graduate program committee permission, students may alter the course load of two courses per semester.

Weeknight and Weekend Residential Program Schedule
Year I
Semester 1 Fall
Fall Residential

MBA 601-2.5 Data and Decision-making

MBA 651-5 Managerial Economics

MBA 681-5 Organizational Leadership and Interpersonal Behavior

Semester 2 Spring

MBA 615-5 Marketing Management

MBA 670-5 Financial and Managerial Accounting

Semester 3 Summer

MBA 606-5 Financial Management

Elective

Year II
Semester 4 Fall
Fall Residential

MBA 602-2.5 The Global Environment of Business

MBA 603-5 Structure and Change in Organizations

MBA 691-5 Business and Government

Semester 5 Spring

MBA 607-5 Business Strategy

MBA 621-5 Information Technology & Organizational Transformation

Semester 6 Summer
Reflection/Action Retreat

MBA 696-5 Applied Strategic Analysis

Executive MBA Courses
MBA 601-2.5 Data and Decision-making

This course explores the application of quantitative methods to managerial decision-making. Topics will include data analysis and statistical description, sampling and statistical inference, and regression analysis. Case studies are used to help managers cope with decision-making in complex and uncertain circumstances.

MBA 602-2.5 The Global Business Environment

This course will examine the international context of business. Fundamental concepts in international finance, economics and business will be introduced and significant trends in the world economy will be analysed. Topics might include global trends in monetary and fiscal policy, exchange rate analysis, trends in international trade and investment, analysis of emerging markets, and strategic alliances. The human, cultural and ethical issues arising from doing business abroad will be discussed.

MBA 603-5 Structure and Change in Organizations

This course applies contemporary organizational theory to the managerial challenges of entrepreneurial, corporate, public sector and not-for-profit organizations in the areas of organizational structure and change, adapting the organizations to their changing environment, and articulating alternate plans for organizational survival (and where possible, growth).

MBA 604-5 Organizational Change and Development

An examination of the concepts, principles and assumptions of organization development.

MBA 606-5 Financial Management

Finance is the study of investments: these investments are made by firms in their operative activities and by persons in their financial portfolios.

MBA 607-5 Business Strategy

Analysis of strategic issues affecting the success of the total enterprise and business units. The course includes industry analysis, internal analysis of the firms' skills, resources and capabilities, corporate and business level strategies, the process of doing strategic analysis, the relationship between strategy and management, and the basic design of a plan of implementation for a strategic plan.

MBA 610-5 Directed Studies in Business Administration

Individual study with a faculty member. The course outline must be approved by the graduate program committee.

MBA 611-5 Directed Studies in Business Administration

Individual study with a faculty member. The course outline must be approved by the graduate program committee.

MBA 612-5 Directed Studies in Business Administration

Individual study with a faculty member. The course outline must be approved by the graduate program committee.

MBA 615-5 Marketing Management

An analysis of the strategic consideration of marketing management and their impact on the firm and its competitors.

MBA 621-5 Information Technology and Organizational Transformation

A seminar format will be used to discuss the concepts and frameworks essential to the effective management of information technology. Our focus will be on the strategic role that information systems play in organizations, their structure and components, and various perspectives on how to plan and manage this technology.

MBA 632-5 Operations Research

Quantitative methods to cope with problems of complexity, uncertainty, and lack of information in organizational decision-making.

MBA 634-5 Business Forecasting

Modern forecasting methods applied to a variable of interest to the student and his employer. Students taking the course must have access to at least five years of monthly data or 12 years of quarterly data on the variable to be forecast. Generally, the paper written for this course will provide the basis for the MBA project.

MBA 651-5 Managerial Economics

The application of modern microeconomic theory to problems of managerial decision-making. The importance of both economic models and quantitative applications are explained. Topics include demand, cost and productivity analysis; the analysis of market structure and firm strategy; international competition and trade; organizational economics; and the analysis of risk, uncertainty and information.

MBA 660-5 Special Topics in Business Administration

Course content varies from semester to semester. Specific course outlines and bibliographies must receive prior approval of the graduate program committee.

MBA 661-5 Special Topics in Business Administration

Course content varies from semester to semester. Specific course outlines and bibliographies must receive prior approval of the graduate program committee.

MBA 662-5 Special Topics in Business Administration

Course content varies from semester to semester. Specific course outlines and bibliographies must receive prior approval of the graduate program committee.

MBA 663-5 Special Topics in Business Administration

Course content varies from semester to semester. Specific course outlines and bibliographies must receive prior approval of the graduate program committee.

MBA 670-5 Financial and Managerial Accounting

Analysis of financial statements and their role in evaluation of the firm, and of internal financial information and its function in planning, control and performance evaluation.

MBA 681-5 Organizational Leadership and Interpersonal Behaviour

Interpersonal relations and group dynamics in organizational life. Development of perceptual and communication skills in small groups. Leadership theory and work group behavior.

MBA 688-5 Industrial Relations

Collective bargaining, the collective agreement, work stoppages, arbitration and the legal environment.

MBA 689-5 Special Topics in Business Administration

Course content varies from semester to semester. Specific course outlines and bibliographies must receive prior approval of the graduate program committee.

MBA 690-5 The Canadian Economy

An investigation of Canadian economic issues and problems, with particular emphasis on their impact on business decisions.

MBA 691-5 Business and Government

This course provides a survey of the relationship between business and government. The course examines the rationale for and nature of government intervention, the impact of public policies on business and the interactions among government, business and society.

MBA 695-5 Methods of Research

Methods and aims of business research and how it contributes to effective management.

MBA 696-5 Applied Strategic Analysis

Students will undertake a strategic firm analysis or public policy analysis (public sector students). Students may undertake other types of projects with permission of the executive MBA director. The project is submitted to the library. Prerequisite: MBA 607, 691.

MBA 698-5 Directed Studies in Business Administration

Individual study with a faculty member. The course outline must be approved by the graduate program committee.

MBA 699-5 Research Project

Execution of research project under faculty supervision. No formal classes.

MBA (Management of Technology)

7200 Harbour Centre, 515 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC, V6B 5K3, 778.782.5259 Tel, 778.782 -5153 Fax, motmba@sfu.ca E-mail, www.harbour.sfu.ca/mot

Academic Director

B.H. Reich BA, MSc, PhD (Br Col)

Executive Director

T. Brown, 7200 Harbour Centre, 778.782 5255

The management of technology MBA addresses the needs of the high technology business sector and continues Simon Fraser University's long tradition of industry collaboration. MOT MBA graduates will have a solid grounding in the theories and disciplines of management, particularly focused on topics relevant to an organization with technical core competencies. MOT MBA students work, or want to work, in enterprises that have products or services based on advanced technology. Most will have an undergraduate degree in a technical discipline; some students will have an undergraduate business degree complemented with technical work experience.

The program consists of two semesters of full time study followed by an industry-based final project. Students who continue working while they complete the program have the option of completing the program over five semesters of study. Courses are delivered face-to-face in new facilities at Simon Fraser University's Harbour Centre campus.

Admission

For admission, applicants to the MOT MBA must have either an undergraduate degree in business (BBA, BCom); or a non-business undergraduate degree combined with the graduate diploma in Business (GDBA); or a non-business undergraduate degree combined with an approved program of business courses. For most applicants the business prerequisite can be satisfied through the successful completion of the management of technology foundation courses (FMOT) offered in the fall semester. In addition to the academic requirements, applicants to the program will be considered based on the following criteria:

A limited number of exceptional candidates who lack some of the academic requirements but who have other outstanding qualifications may be admitted once they have completed specific preparatory courses.

The application deadline for all students is June 30. Late applicants who meet all the program prerequisites may be considered for admission at the discretion of the program director.

Application

Students must submit the following documentation when applying for the MOT MBA.

Financial Assistance

Two scholarships annually in the amount of $10,000 will be awarded from funds donated by the MOT Business Council. A number of teaching assistantships, valued at up to $3,800 each, are available to qualified graduate students. In addition to teaching assistantships, members of the faculty from time to time have funding available to hire research assistants.

The Bank of Montreal offers a student line of credit for Canadian citizens and landed immigrants. Loan information and application packages are available from the MOT MBA office. eligible students may also apply to the Canada Student Loan program in their province of residence.

A number of graduate fellowships are available to students who demonstrate high academic performance.

See "Financial Assistance and Awards". for information on other university scholarships and awards that are available to graduate students.

Degree Requirements

To qualify for the MBA degree, students must maintain a minimum average grade of B (3.0 grade point average) and complete courses totalling 36 credit hours or more from the following list:

BUS 750-4 Managing Technological Innovation

BUS 752-4 Strategic Management of Technology-based Firms

BUS 754-4 Marketing Technology-based Products and Services

BUS 756-4 Strategic Use of Information and Knowledge

BUS 758-4 Supply Chain Management

BUS 760-4 Organizing, Motivating, and Leading the Technology-driven Enterprise

BUS 762-4 Project Management

BUS 764-2 Financing the Organization

BUS 766-2 Organizational Focus, and Control through Financial Management

BUS 774-4 Special Topics*

BUS 776-4 Special Topics*

BUS 778-4 Directed Studies in Management of Technology*

BUS 780-4 Applied Project

* requires prior approval of the academic director

MBA (Management of Technology) Courses

BUS 750-4 Managing Technological Innovation

This course examines successful product and process innovations in industry, as well as the effective organization and management of the technological change process in new ventures, multi-divisional and multinational enterprises.

BUS 752-4 Strategic Management of Technology-based Firms

This course deals with how technology-based firms develop and implement strategies to create competitive advantage. The module treats strategy at two levels of analysis: (a) the overall strategy of the firm and (b) the technology strategy of the firm.

BUS 754-4 Marketing Technology-based Products and Services

What differentiates high-tech markets from more traditional ones is the environment - shrinking product life cycles, rapid changes in information and knowledge and great uncertainty about competitors. This course is designed to teach strategies for developing and executing marketing strategies in technology-intensive markets.

BUS 756-4 Strategic Use of Information and Knowledge

This course will demonstrate, through cases and discussion, how information can be used to support decision-making, monitor operations and enable global communications. Topics will include knowledge management and information technology to support a learning organization.

BUS 758-4 Supply Chain Management

This course demonstrates how strategic competitive advantages can be gained through supply chain management - the processes of logistics, production, delivery and after sales service. Concepts such as flexible manufacturing, just in time inventories and service quality will be examined.

BUS 760-4 Organizing, Motivating, and Leading the Technology-driven Enterprise

Technology-driven organizations are particularly dependent upon human resources. Their employees are intelligent, highly skilled and very mobile. This course discusses the human resource structures and strategies that technology-based firms use to achieve growth of both the firm and the individual.

BUS 762-4 Project Management

In high technology firms, projects are a way of life. The introduction of a new product or service, the redesign of an information system, and the opening of a new warehouse are all examples of projects that the technology-driven manager may encounter. This course demonstrates how complexity can be managed in a manner that increases the probability of project success. As a course assignment, students develop their own plan for the project/internship phase of the program

BUS 764-2 Financing the Organization

A basic understanding of the sources of capital, how to allocate it and how to regenerate it is necessary for technology managers. This course surveys the sources of venture capital, initial public offerings, mergers and debt capital. It also concentrates on net present values, internal rates of return, and other tools for capital budgeting and valuation.

BUS 766-2 Organizational Focus, and Control through Financial Management

Success is often tempered by the constraint of money. Project budgeting, cash flow projection, and contingency planning are tools that help keep the flow of funds in balance. This course looks at how the technology manager can influence the flow of funds through numerous measures such as leverage, equity injections, credit policies, dividends and taxes.

BUS 774-4 Special Topics
BUS 776-4 Special Topics
BUS 778-4 Directed Studies in Management of Technology

Individual study with a faculty member. A course outline must be approved by the graduate program committee.

BUS 780-4 Applied Project

Students will undertake a strategic business analysis and write an extended essay jointly supervised by a Simon Fraser University faculty member and an industry partner. The Management of Technology program director and a faculty member will negotiate the purpose, content and deliverables of each project with the student and the sponsoring organization.



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