SFU Calendar 2001-2002

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Department of Physics


P8429 Shrum Science Centre, (604) 2914465 Tel, (604) 2913592 Fax, www.phys.sfu.ca

Chair

M. Plischke BSc (Montr), MPhil (Yale), PhD (Yeshiva)

Graduate Program Chair

J.L. Bechhoefer AB (Harv), PhD (Chic)

Faculty and Areas of Research

see "Department of Physics". for a complete list of faculty.

A.S. Arrott* - magnetism, liquid crystals

L.E. Ballentine - dynamical chaos, foundations of quantum mechanics

J.L. Bechhoefer - liquid crystals, soft condensed matter, pattern formation

D.H. Boal - statistical mechanics and biophysics

C. Bolognesi - semiconductor devices

B.P. Clayman - far-infrared properties of solids

J.F. Cochran* - surface impedance of metals, ferromagnetism

K. Colbow* - thin film semiconductors, microsensors, solid state gas sensors, hydrogen storage materials

E.D. Crozier - condensed matter, structure and electronic properties, EXAFS

A.E. Curzon* - scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray analysis, materials science

J.S. Dodge - superconductivity, magnetism, optical spectroscopy

R.H. Enns - non-linear problems in optics and other areas of physics

R.F. Frindt - layered solids, intercalation solids

B.J. Frisken - soft condensed matter

S. Gygax* - superconductivity, low temperature physics

M. Hayden - experimental condensed matter physics, resonance imaging

B. Heinrich - molecular beam epitaxy, superconductivity, surface physics

D.J. Huntley - luminescence dating, archaeometry

J.C. Irwin* - layered compounds and high temperature superconductors, Raman scattering

I. Herbut - condensed matter theory

K.L. Kavanagh - materials science

G. Kirczenow - condensed matter theory

S.R. Morrison* - physical and chemical properties of semiconductor surfaces, energy storage and conversion

L.H. Palmer* - astronomy, astrophysics, musical acoustics

M. Plischke - condensed matter theory, statistical physics

K.E. Rieckhoff* - chemical physics, spectroscopy

J.E. Sonier - MuSR spectroscopy, high TC superconductivity

J.L. Thewalt - biophysics, NMR studies of membranes

M.L.W. Thewalt - semiconductor physics

H.D. Trottier - lattice quantum chromodynamics, phenomenology of strong and weak interactions, field theoretical study of non-Abelian gauge theories

K.S. Viswanathan - high energy theory, classical and quantum gravity

S. Watkins - semiconductor physics

M. Wortis - solid state theory, statistical mechanics, surface physics, membranes, biophysics

Adjunct Faculty

B.K. Jennings - theoretical intermediate energy physics

M. Vetterli - intermediate energy and particle physics

J. Vrba - thin films, SQUID systems

R.M. Woloshyn - theoretical particle physics, lattice field theory

Associate Members

J.M. D'Auria, Chemistry

D.E. Nelson, Archaeology

E.M. Voigt,* Chemistry

*emeritus

Degrees Offered

The Department of Physics offers programs leading to the MSc and PhD degrees in physics.

MSc Program

Admission

To qualify for admission, a student must have at least second class standing or equivalent, in honors physics, honors mathematics and physics, engineering physics, or electrical engineering. see "1.3 Admission"..

Degree Requirements
Course Work

The minimum requirement is 17 credit hours, of which at least 14 must be at the graduate level and will normally include

PHYS 801-2 Student Seminar

PHYS 810-3 Fundamental Quantum Mechanics

PHYS 821-3 Electromagnetic Theory

and one of

PHYS 811-3 Advanced Topics in Quantum Mechanics

PHYS 841-3 Equilibrium Statistical Mechanics

Additional undergraduate courses, including prerequisites to required graduate courses, may be required to remedy deficiencies in background.

Research

Part of the program is conducting original research. A thesis describing this research is submitted and defended at the program's conclusion.

PhD Program

Admission

To qualify for admission, a student must have a master's degree or the equivalent in physics. Also see "Graduate General Regulations"..

Degree Requirements
Course Work

The minimum requirement consists of nine hours of graduate credit beyond the master's. Faculty of Science requirements must also be met.

Research

A major portion of this program is conducting original research. A thesis, embodying new and important results or original research, must be presented and defended at the conclusion of the degree program.

Admission from a Master's Program to the PhD Program

A student may be admitted from an MSc to a PhD program with a CGPA that normally will be at least 3.67 calculated over a minimum of 15 graduate level credits, and approval of the student's supervisory committee and senate graduate studies committee.

Language Requirement

In certain areas of research, familiarity with languages other than English may be important so a student's supervisory committee may require a reading knowledge of one such language.

Biophysics

Students who wish to undertake interdisciplinary work in Biophysics may apply to the Department of Physics or the Department of Biological Sciences. Those who wish to work in biophysics under special arrangements should see "1.3.4 Admission to a Doctoral Program"..

Chemical Physics

Students who wish to undertake interdisciplinary work in chemical physics may apply to the Department of Physics or to the Department of Chemistry. Those who wish to work in chemical physics under special arrangements should see "1.3.4 Admission to a Doctoral Program"..

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

See "Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry".

Graduate Courses

PHYS 801-2 Student Seminar

Discussion of recent developments in physics, based on student seminars. Attendance is required for all students proceeding toward MSc or PhD degrees in physics. Course offered regularly.

PHYS 810-3 Fundamental Quantum Mechanics

Review of foundations of quantum mechanics, states and observables, measurement theory, angular momentum, time reversal, stationary and time dependent perturbation theory, variational methods. Course offered regularly. Prerequisite: PHYS 415, or equivalent.

PHYS 811-3 Advanced Topics in Quantum Mechanics

A continuation of PHYS 810: scattering theory, spin statistics, creation and annihilation operators, diagrammatic perturbation theory, relativistic QM. Prerequisite: PHYS 810 or equivalent.

PHYS 812-3 Introduction to Quantum Field Theory

Lorentz group and representations, Dirac and Klein-Gordon Equations, Maxwell's equations and quantization, perturbation theory, Feynman diagrams and rules, strong and weak interactions. Course offered occasionally. Prerequisite: PHYS 811 or equivalent.

PHYS 821-3 Electromagnetic Theory

Advanced topics in classical electromagnetic theory: review of Maxwell's equations, wave propagation, radiation theory, special relativity and electromagnetic theory, magnetohydrodynamics and plasma physics, radiation damping. Course offered regularly. Prerequisite: PHYS 425, or equivalent.

PHYS 841-3 Equilibrium Statistical Mechanics

Review of ensembles and thermodynamics, ideal gases, imperfect classical gases, classical and modern theories of phase transitions, renormalization group. Course offered regularly. Prerequisite: PHYS 345, or equivalent.

PHYS 846-3 Nonlinear Physics

Nonlinear dynamics and chaos. Pattern formation and an introduction to turbulence. Prerequisite: PHYS 384 or equivalent.

PHYS 847-3 Topics in soft-condensed matter and biological physics

An introduction to one of several topics in soft-condensed matter and biological physics. Recent versions of this course have focused on polymers, liquid crystals, structures of biological membranes, and cell mechanics. Corequisite: PHYS 841.

PHYS 861-3 Introduction to Solid State Physics

Free electron theory, crystal structure, band theory, Bloch's theorem, electron dynamics, phonons, semiconductors. Course offered regularly. Prerequisite: PHYS 465 or equivalent, and PHYS 415.

PHYS 862-3 Solid State Physics II

Special topics in solid state physics such as superconductivity, magnetism, optical properties of solids, electron correlations. Course offered regularly. Prerequisite: PHYS 861.

PHYS 863-3 Surface Science, Thin Films and Interfaces

Review of surface science techniques: Auger, XPS electron spectroscopies, low energy electron diffraction (LEED), high energy electron diffraction (RHEED), Scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). Review of thin film deposition techniques: molecular beam epitaxy of metallic and semiconductor multilayer and superlattice structures. Physics and chemistry of surfaces and interfaces. Course offered occasionally. Prerequisite: PHYS 810, 821, 861 or permission of the department.

PHYS 871-3 Introduction to Elementary Particle Physics

Elementary particle phenomenology; classification of particles, forces, conservation laws, relativistic scattering theory, electromagnetic interactions of leptons and hadrons, weak interactions, gauge theories, strong interactions. Course offered occasionally.

PHYS 880-3 Applications of Group Theory to Physics

Elements of group theory, matrix representations, the Clebsch-Gordon series, applications of finite and continuous groups to problems in atomic, solid state and elementary particle physics. Course offered occasionally.

PHYS 881-3 Special Topics I
PHYS 882-3 Special Topics II
PHYS 883-3 Special Topics III
PHYS 884-2 Special Topics IV
PHYS 885-2 Special Topics V
PHYS 886-2 Special Topics VI
PHYS 898-0 MSc Thesis
PHYS 899-0 PhD Thesis


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Index : searchable with the Find function in your web browser Calendar.pdfs Office of the Registrar / SFU
Table of Contents : searchable with the Find function in your web browser Course Database or Course Outlines
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Financial Assistance